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Old 03-29-2013, 09:36 AM   #31
Skibikejunkie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
Take a BRC before you hurt yourself again, and before you pick up bad habits. Consider a beginner dirtbike course too.
This.

My wife and I just took a rider education course. Worth every penny and then some. Once you've done that, you will be a lot more comfortable with the controls and will have a foundation for good habits. First thing they'll have you do is feather the clutch so you can walk your bike in first gear.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:21 AM   #32
TheMule
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Did the 2013 TW show up at Easter? If so congrats and enjoy! There's alot more to a motorcycle than just displacement. I've been away from the TW for awhile now but still wish I had one. Every time I see one I smile and get the itch to go further in debt!
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:20 AM   #33
NJ-Brett
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That is a bit extreme!
If you are going fast over rough stuff, its a handfull, and it can hurt you in a fall due to its weight, but lots of people ride much worse in the dirt.
Lower it, leave the suspension soft and it does very well at moderate speeds.
The KLR is much worse (heavier), the 650 Honda is way high and the BMW's weigh more I think.

I think the xt225 and the crf230 are better then the TW200, but the TW200 would be my pick if I had to ride miles of sand, swamp, mud and nasty hills.
Next up might be a dr350, add lots of street, the dr650 lowered.



Quote:
Originally Posted by montesa_vr View Post
YES! I am 6' 4" tall, I have been riding motorcycles for over 40 years, have raced in half a dozen motocrosses, have ridden to Alaska and Mexico, and I don't see myself ever being comfortable enough with the DR650 to ride it offroad either! The big Suzuki is too tall, has too high a first gear, too little flywheel, and too much power for beginners. It is a white-knuckle terror off-road, and you are just another in a long line of victims. Unlike many who have gone before you, your experience hasn't completely put you off motorcycles.

Buy the TW200 and stay off the freeway and have a blast.
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:05 PM   #34
Kommando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skibikejunkie View Post
This.

My wife and I just took a rider education course. Worth every penny and then some. Once you've done that, you will be a lot more comfortable with the controls and will have a foundation for good habits. First thing they'll have you do is feather the clutch so you can walk your bike in first gear.
I rode since I was a kid, and had several bikes off and on over the years. I already had my M license for quite a while and finally took a BRC around age 34. My riding improved noticeably over the weekend, to both me AND the coaches. It has continued to improve over time as I practice more drills, read more, and started riding different off-pavement terrains.

The difference in skill and confidence that I saw in the raw beginners in my BRC amazed me. Some had never even operated a clutch before, cage OR moto. Only one person washed out of the range, and everybody else seemed to have an easy time of most of the final skills test...over the short time-frame of a weekend! 'Unreal! I stripped countersteering down to the bare essentials. I can swerve MUCH faster now, with much better precision and control, and I continue to improve as I practice and learn more.
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:39 PM   #35
Shesaid OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMule View Post
Did the 2013 TW show up at Easter? If so congrats and enjoy! There's alot more to a motorcycle than just displacement. I've been away from the TW for awhile now but still wish I had one. Every time I see one I smile and get the itch to go further in debt!
The Easter bunny did, indeed, deliver a shiny new TW.



I picked it up the day before Easter with .7 miles on the odo. As of this afternoon (mind you, I only get to ride on the weekends just yet) the odometer is boasting 21 miles.

I've dubbed the new bike the "Tipsy Wombat," having decided to stick with the "TW" theme for a name. It is a wholly different experience from the DR650. The TW is so mucher smaller from the lower stock seat height (My DR has been lowered,) to the grip on the clutch and front brake levers. The controls feel so much more intuitive for me and I can find and reach everything without having to look for it.

It's true, I won't be getting any speeding tickets on this thing! I had it up to 30 mph today and the Wombat and I were both plenty happy with that... how long does it take before going over 20 stops feeling like you're breaking the sound barrier? LOL.

But I'm loving the bike and feeling more confident about riding-- although the 14-year-old neice gets on the Fat Cat and smokes me, yelling "GO FASTER!" as she passes me.

Oh well. I'm having fun and I'll get faster with time.
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:57 PM   #36
tommu56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shesaid View Post
The Easter bunny did, indeed, deliver a shiny new TW.



I picked it up the day before Easter with .7 miles on the odo. As of this afternoon (mind you, I only get to ride on the weekends just yet) the odometer is boasting 21 miles.

I've dubbed the new bike the "Tipsy Wombat," having decided to stick with the "TW" theme for a name. It is a wholly different experience from the DR650. The TW is so mucher smaller from the lower stock seat height (My DR has been lowered,) to the grip on the clutch and front brake levers. The controls feel so much more intuitive for me and I can find and reach everything without having to look for it.

It's true, I won't be getting any speeding tickets on this thing! I had it up to 30 mph today and the Wombat and I were both plenty happy with that... how long does it take before going over 20 stops feeling like you're breaking the sound barrier? LOL.

But I'm loving the bike and feeling more confident about riding-- although the 14-year-old neice gets on the Fat Cat and smokes me, yelling "GO FASTER!" as she passes me.

Oh well. I'm having fun and I'll get faster with time.

Cool

It will do a little better than the 55 red line on speedometer when you get that far.
Take your time the first 3 months on a bike are just getting the feel of it!
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Old 04-08-2013, 03:26 AM   #37
greer
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Yahoo!

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Old 04-08-2013, 06:46 AM   #38
TheMule
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shesaid View Post

I'm having fun

THE most important thing!! Congrats!!
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TW Goes To Alaska Solo
http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...ght=utah+tw200

My Bike
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ighlight=tw200 (Sold )

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Old 04-08-2013, 07:45 AM   #39
NJ-Brett
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Tip:
The stock front tire is poor at everything.
Its rough and noisy on the street, and has very little grip in the dirt.
A real dual sport tire is much nicer.
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Old 05-07-2013, 05:15 AM   #40
billmags
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Congrats on the TeeDub! Have fun! It always makes me smile at some point while riding it. :)
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Old 05-07-2013, 05:39 AM   #41
Canuman
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+1 On that. A friend just spooned a rear onto his TW's front, and he really noticed the difference. Rear-wheel wash-outs are sporty and part of the off-road game. Front wheel wash-outs lead to hurty things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
Tip:
The stock front tire is poor at everything.
Its rough and noisy on the street, and has very little grip in the dirt.
A real dual sport tire is much nicer.
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Old 05-07-2013, 06:27 AM   #42
NJ-Brett
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Well, I do not know under what situation you could wash out that rear tire!
But the stock front tire just sucks at everything.
I used a shinko dual sport on the front, smooth and quiet on the street, much more grip in the dirt.

The TW is great for new dirt riders, much easier to control in mud/sand, you can ignore and hit roots rocks and whatever in the trail and the big front tire just absorbs them. The rim is super strong, so you can hit/run over anything.
Air the tires down and the grip goes up and the ride gets smooth, and the TW floats over thick sand and mud holes.

The wheels like to stay on the ground, the back is not going to slide, and you can forget about avoiding things in the trail, so its very different from a regular bike, and that is just the thing for someone starting out.
No matter what they run into, they can make it and its not hard at all.

My TW did not like high speeds in the dirt, 40 to 50 was tops really, but I went places I would never go on other bikes, and that was solo riding.
How many people would ride through a swamp many miles from anything, all alone?
The TW made it easy and fun.

You made a great choice in getting the TW.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuman View Post
+1 On that. A friend just spooned a rear onto his TW's front, and he really noticed the difference. Rear-wheel wash-outs are sporty and part of the off-road game. Front wheel wash-outs lead to hurty things.
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Old 05-07-2013, 12:20 PM   #43
SkiBumBrian
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Loved your write up and the sound advice you have been given, I just have to relate a story (MUCH shorter) that parallels yours. Most of my friends ride cruisers, whatever. A friend (female) has been riding 2 up with a buddy on his 1100 Shadow and likes it but wants to ride for herself. For some reason he and her father think it is a good idea that she buy a big V-twin cruiser of some sort and I just look at them in disbelief. She has never ridden before and I and some others have finally talked her into a smaller DS and have her looking at a DR200 right now.
We all know during the learning curve that there will be get offs, usually in low speed turns or starting and stopping. A huge cruiser that she cannot possibly pick up when it lands on her seems ludicrous. A DR or a TW (there is one of each right now locally) seems like a great starter bike that she can turn over next year with better skills and lose little or no money on the transaction.
Thank you for your post, I will share this with her and feel assured it will set her mind at ease about "starting small".
Heal well, Shesaid. As far as your question of going slow I have not ridden either of those bikes but has anyone ever told you about a Rekluse clutch? It takes away a lot of that slow speed, clutch slipping action needed off road...
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Old 05-07-2013, 03:08 PM   #44
Canuman
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A TW or an XT225 has little need for a Rekluse, even in the unlikely event that one were available. They both have stump-pulling low gears, which can be made even more sinister by dropping a tooth on the front countershaft if you wish to swap your speedo for a calendar. The little bikes really inspire tremendous confidence. They are very difficult to stall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiBumBrian View Post
As far as your question of going slow I have not ridden either of those bikes but has anyone ever told you about a Rekluse clutch? It takes away a lot of that slow speed, clutch slipping action needed off road...
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Old 05-07-2013, 05:16 PM   #45
NJ-Brett
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I went down 2 teeth on the back sprocket and it still had that stump pulling 1st gear.

And if I had space, I would hold onto the TW when its time for a bigger bike, it makes a great buddy bike, and its great for some silly dirt fun.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuman View Post
A TW or an XT225 has little need for a Rekluse, even in the unlikely event that one were available. They both have stump-pulling low gears, which can be made even more sinister by dropping a tooth on the front countershaft if you wish to swap your speedo for a calendar. The little bikes really inspire tremendous confidence. They are very difficult to stall.
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