ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-05-2013, 08:57 AM   #1
Snowbird OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Oddometer: 372
Question I want to carry a KLR on a motor home

I've looked around the web and tried searching here without reaching a decision. Below is a link to one carrier I've found, but if anyone has links to others that they've had success with, I'd be happy to hear.

In general, my criteria (no surprises here-- wish for the stars, ha ha) is:

Cheap

Simple

Light

Rugged

http://www.discountramps.com/smc-600...cle-hauler.htm

This mounts right in the 2" receiver already on the back of my motor home, which would be a huge asset to me.

Thank you if you can offer me some advice and I sincerely hope I selected the best section to post this.
Snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 10:26 AM   #2
bomber60015
Anatomically Correct
 
bomber60015's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Chicago-ish
Oddometer: 9,924
A budy hauled is KLR from Tejas to Chi-town last year using that rig on his truck . . . . .worked fine . . . .
he used 3 or 4 extra tie downs to make absolutely certain it'd stay put, and I'd likely do the same, but the device itself worked as advertised.
__________________
"Here is your country. Cherish these natural wonders, cherish the natural resources, cherish the history and romance as a sacred heritage, for your children and your children's children. Do not let selfish men or greedy interests skin your country of its beauty, its riches or its romance.” T.R.
bomber60015 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 11:58 AM   #3
XR4EVER
919 excuses to ride!
 
XR4EVER's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Post Falls, ID
Oddometer: 1,083
My dyslexia just struck -- I read, "I want to carry a motor home on a KLR"

Honestly, it wouldn't have been that crazy of an idea compared to some I've seen involving a KLR.....
__________________
I hate bear grass.
XR4EVER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 07:48 AM   #4
notrivia
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Anywhere my tent fits!
Oddometer: 60
Ramp it Up!

Aloha Snowbird!
Contact various motorcycle dealerships and they will give you the names of the various manufacturers. In my experience, all these ramps are hitch afixed, and often cost more. The real problem you'll find is that many of these ramps do not have drop-down features that allow you to get your bike up, especially alone.
The one you have there seems pretty good. But I would buy one at a dealership and have them install it, so if there are any problems, they will be obligated to fix it. You will also be able to load the bike with them there, so if it is to technically difficult to do alone, then you'll know, and learn to innovate with someone there to help you. Also, do not attach your bike exclusively to the rack . If the hitch system fails ... Ohhhh ....

Just make sure you get one with a ramp that allows you to get it up.

I would also contact various RV shops. They obviously have experience with this.
Hop this helps!
notrivia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 11:06 AM   #5
Snowbird OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Oddometer: 372
/\ Yeah. Same company makes one very similar except it only is rated for 400 pounds. I'm figuring get the 600 pound one for some extra cushion of safety and longevity of the rack. I think my motor home's receiver is more than a Class III. I'll have to look, but I'm okay either way.

A ramp is included, but they still recommend 2 people, which I have.
Snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2013, 06:29 PM   #6
welder
Beastly Adventurer
 
welder's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: paradise
Oddometer: 1,520
I actually built a carrier for my klr but my class 3 is rated for 500lbs. ended up using it to haul my trials bike around.
__________________
"If you come to a fork in the road, take it." Yogi Berra.
welder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 01:22 AM   #7
WalterDavis
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 19
I bought one from rockymountainatvmotorcycle. Com. It works, but it's kind of sketchy with a klr, so i stopped at a welding shop and bought some thicker square tubing for the tie-down arms at the front end, which i cut as long as possible without hitting the bumper .
I also run straps from the bed over the tailgate to negate some of the weight and side-swaying. I carried my klr at least 9000 miles incident free with it last year, though!
WalterDavis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 08:05 AM   #8
Ron from BC
Beastly Adventurer
 
Ron from BC's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver Island
Oddometer: 1,341
Rating

There in lies the rub. Most of these RV hitches are only rated for 500 pounds and with the carrier you use, Versahaul or home made, weighing in at 90 pounds or so that limits your bike options. Trials would be great but if you want a DS bike on the back, KLR, R100GS etc, that weight restriction certainly cuts your options down.
__________________
'02 BMW R1150 GSA
'06 Kawasaki KL250H Super Sherpa
Ron from BC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 11:03 AM   #9
XR4EVER
919 excuses to ride!
 
XR4EVER's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Post Falls, ID
Oddometer: 1,083
If I was going to spend money on a carrier, this is the route I would go....

http://www.ultimatemxhauler.com/inde...emart&Itemid=9
__________________
I hate bear grass.
XR4EVER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 07:48 PM   #10
CycleDoc59
Wrench Rider
 
CycleDoc59's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: East Virginia
Oddometer: 888
The problem is much more than the actual weight of the
motorcycle plus the weight of the ramp/support.

As the load is well behind the vehicle wheels, whenever there's
a bump, the true total load weight skyrockets well above
static weight.

A KLR is over 400#, and a decent carrier plus hitch is another
100-300#. Some use three receivers to spread the load.

Good site here, with many choices:
http://www.ehamiltonenterprises.com/motorcycle.html
CycleDoc59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2013, 09:29 PM   #11
Flashmo
Whatever...
 
Flashmo's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Vagabond Hippie
Oddometer: 2,543
Three receivers for big bikes. Buy the unit you want, then have a welding shop add two receivers to your MH hitch and two drawbars to the ramp set up.

Your MH may suck to drive this way, I know mine would. My bikes go on a trailer behind it.
Flashmo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 04:53 AM   #12
Snowbird OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Oddometer: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashmo View Post
Three receivers for big bikes. Buy the unit you want, then have a welding shop add two receivers to your MH hitch and two drawbars to the ramp set up.

Your MH may suck to drive this way, I know mine would. My bikes go on a trailer behind it.
Thanks everyone for all the thoughtful replies. I just now found my this, own thread.

I ended up buying the 600 pound rated carrier from Discount Ramps referenced in the first post, carrying the bike 1500 miles through the Appalachians without incident. For this trip, my SO followed me in a car we also had to get north and she reported the bike was very stable at almost all times. This agrees with what I was seeing in the back up camera.

I agree, though, that relying solely on the single receiver may not be good long term since it's 500 pound rating isn't exactly what the manufacturer had in mind. OTOH, a 5,000 pound trailer with a 10% tongue weight probably puts quite a load on the receiver as well.

Flashmo, I early-on considered using a trailer of some sort, but rejected the idea for the same reason I don't pull a car: backing up becomes an issue. With a trailer, you then need a pull-through campsite every night. A lot of parks don't even have pull-throughs, especially the state-run parks I prefer.

I did not notice any significant difference in handling with the bike on the back of the MH, which frankly surprised me.

I'm subscribing to the thread this time so maybe I can find it again? Each forum has it's own tricks to returning to a thread.
Snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 05:43 AM   #13
Unstable Rider
Beyond Thunderdome
 
Unstable Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Oddometer: 2,446
I agree with a couple of the other gents, the carrier basket might be rated for a naked KLR, but most reciver hitch setups and the hardware they are attached with and the overall design not going to be "safe" for the traffic that's behind you.

Any reputable welding shop could customize the set-up and make it a 2 or 3 point docking-receiver rig so that it slips into MULTIPLE receiver slots and would be sturdy as hell. As long as you leave the "center" slot, it could always be used for standard towing. Outer receiver "slots" stabilize the load and distribute-off some of the weight concentration, like sway bars when towing RV trailers.

Most "baskets" fit so loose on the hitch that the "bounce" factor gets going and takes it's toll on other areas.

Just me, but I would not haul more than a modest 250 in this fashion-- unless the rig had multiple receiver docking points.
__________________
.
-“Ah, you're wasting you're time. They can't track us over rocks.
Tell them that.......... --Who are those guys?”


~Butch Cassidy
Unstable Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 08:44 AM   #14
Snowbird OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Oddometer: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unstable Rider View Post
I agree with a couple of the other gents, the carrier basket might be rated for a naked KLR, but most reciver hitch setups and the hardware they are attached with and the overall design not going to be "safe" for the traffic that's behind you.

Any reputable welding shop could customize the set-up and make it a 2 or 3 point docking-receiver rig so that it slips into MULTIPLE receiver slots and would be sturdy as hell. As long as you leave the "center" slot, it could always be used for standard towing. Outer receiver "slots" stabilize the load and distribute-off some of the weight concentration, like sway bars when towing RV trailers.

Most "baskets" fit so loose on the hitch that the "bounce" factor gets going and takes it's toll on other areas.

Just me, but I would not haul more than a modest 250 in this fashion-- unless the rig had multiple receiver docking points.
No.

The setup includes two methods to stabilize the carrier. Either is enough; I used both.

As for the traffic behind me: I suppose there is a theoretical-- if miniscule-- risk to their safety, but it's so low as not to register on any reasonable scale... assuming your comment was regarding the unit in post 1. IMO, that unit is the best value and sufficient.
Snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 12:35 PM   #15
rgoers
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Northern Utah
Oddometer: 372
As long as the carrier is rated for the weight, you'll be good. My only advice would be to make sure you do NOT use cam-buckle straps to secure it. Get some good quality 1.5" to 2" wide ratchet straps. Cam-buckle straps can and will work themselves loose. I almost lost my KLX250 off the back of my truck because my straps did just that.

Next question is; why not carry the camper on the KLR? You'd get better mileage, and I'm SURE the KLR could easily handle it!
__________________
2009 KLX 250S
If it ain't broke, take it apart and find out why!
rgoers is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014