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Old 09-15-2013, 05:25 PM   #1
Zeid OP
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"Post Adventure Syndrome"

I have a R1200GS Adventure, maxed out adventure style. The thing is, I not only like- I NEED to ride every day and in a place that has year round riding I can if I so desire. It doesn't have to be a long jaunt, even a few miles around the neighborhoods suffice. I'm no druggie, not big into alcohol, never been one for meds, my one fix that has kept me sane throughout the years has been motorcycling. Even if I don't have a ton of money I always keep a nice bike.

It got me thinking though, I bought my bimmer because I am definitely an adventure motorcyclist. I've traveled around the county more times than once on more bike than one and love it, but due to my job and not having more than a couple days off at a time and vacation time quite scarce in these days and times, I can never take more than a little day or over~nighter trip if I'm lucky. 99% of my riding is done around the city and more often than not, around my neck of the woods. When I take it just outside of town to go trail blazing I feel like I'm not doing the bike justice, it's like running your jeep through a puddle to feel like you're getting your monies worth out of it. I also never really feel satisfied on it until I find a really good long lasting trail or a set of twisties to tear up.

I feel silly at times, like "This thing should be going up a twisty mountain or mongolian dessert, not to Wal-Mart and through the neighborhoods." I also have a full suit of gear, all seasons, jacket, pants, boots, helmets, gloves, etc. Whenever I take a little ride I "suit up" but the ride never lasts too long and here in Phoenix it is damn hot with the jacket, boots, gloves, and pants on. I've always been a huge advocate of safe riding and atgatt and I would never even remotely consider riding around helmet-less (they never bother me) but a few times I've ridden around in my blue jeans, sneakers and a T-shirt. It felt so refreshing, so nice and I didn't feel like I was having a heat stroke (which has happened in the heat of the summer with all that gear on).

It doesn't help that Indian started producing motorcycles again, they look amazing. I began pondering "What if I had that Chief Vintage? It has saddlebags and a windscreen if I want to take a trip, but looks more proper and easier just cruising around town." I love to relax when I ride and just, feel good. Sport bikes, nakeds and other such things are neat but I'm not really into riding fast and hard nor are my bad knees fond of them. I keep looking at that big chief classic thinking about how I almost bought a Road King instead of the R1200GS.

I don't think any one bike is better than another, they're all amazingly fabulous in one respect or another and anyone who loves to ride a motorcycle is instantly a friend of mine, I love all kinds of bikes but since I can only afford to have one I begin to question if I have the right bike for me. Unfortunately my bike is financed, although I don't think I'm very upside down on it (if all) but am unsure how difficult it would be for me to switch bikes. I just wonder some times if I would be happier riding down the street (with a helmet always) in a T-shirt and Jeans on a nice indian, simply cruising off into the sunset at the edge of town, through the neighborhood and if I want, slapping a windscreen on to go take a little trip.

So my question is to the other riders who have large scale adventure bikes, do you fancy simply cruising and joy riding around town on them? Do you feel silly or do you simply ride them when you get a chance to really do what they're made for? Has anyone felt this way before?

Any advice would be much appreciated. Sorry if this sounds insane. Thanks.
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Old 09-15-2013, 05:34 PM   #2
LowInSlo
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Not insane at all. The right bike at the right time I truly understand. When I lived just outside Boston, my lowered R1200 GS was a great bike for me. Did great in all that horrible weather with good enough protection for me. Comfy, good for short trips our travels. Tall for lil ol' me, but I did ok on it. Now I'm in California. Beautiful place, but where I am, everything is a mountain or canyon. Yeah, yeah, I know - perfect. Except the big girl was just too much bike for me out here. So I got a 2005 F650GS, also lowered. Man, I LOVE it, for me now. Lower, 100 pounds lighter, easier for me to deal with on these crazy roads. And, that includes the road to the grocery store and the bank.

While I'm not a fan of a tshirt and sandals on a motorcycle, I can definitely see the appeal of a cruiser in your situation. Heck, I do too, and I really dig this 650. And - ain't those Indians beautiful?

Anybody wanna buy my lowered 1200GS?
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Old 09-15-2013, 06:41 PM   #3
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Sounds like it's time for a change. Nothing wrong with that. I never understood the big heavy bike on a trail thing, instead I like a very light bike on trails and save the heavy ones for the highway. How about a new Indian and a used light dual sport.
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Old 09-15-2013, 06:57 PM   #4
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Every rider needs at least three bikes. (IMO)
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Old 09-15-2013, 07:06 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Every rider needs at least three bikes. (IMO)
4 - don't go messing it up for me with the wife. She must know this is a standard among motorcyclists. 4 bikes min.
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:55 PM   #6
Zeid OP
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I totally agree that one bike is just not enough for a true motorcycle enthusiast. If I had plenty of money I'd have a Dirt Bike, a Supersport spec'd out for the track with a track suit to boot, a R1200GS for touring and well groomed trails and a cruiser for around town. All motorcycles are cool, fun, pretty and neat in some way, but for each specifically one does something a little more focused on what you need.

The new Indians are indeed beautiful, I love the chief vintage, it is a bagger, looks good around town, has an easily detachable windshield...

When I financed the BMW they did it 0 down more or less, but they gave me all three aluminum panniers for free, the triple black model for free and gave it to me at a pretty good price. I think I could break even if I sold it, the thing is- my credit isn't perfect, it's good but not "perfect" and BMW was nice enough to believe the income I put down on the credit app, which wasn't far off but not my exact take home either. I also wonder how it looks in the eyes of the people reviewing an application when you just bought a motorcycle and now you're trying to buy another. What's more is that I know whenever something is financed your credit score takes a small hit, so my point in all this is... I'm not sure if I could finance a new Indian like I did my BMW, I'm not sure how "competitive" a dealer selling those would be getting me financed.

I just don't know.

I don't hate the BMW at all either, if I'm stuck with it I will be more than happy and am very grateful to have such a fabulous bike. Again, it's just when I take a ride down these slow and strait residential streets and in stop and go big city traffic, I begin to wonder what I'm doing on this thing.

Thanks for the replies, still looking for more advice, opinions or anyone who's faced similar.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:10 PM   #7
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If what you really want is to ride around in Jeans and a t-shirt, then just do it.
Doesn't require an Indian to do so.
I can tell you that a big cruiser is a fun bike and they are great at a lot of things but so is the GS.
That big Indian will be happiest eating hundreds of miles rather than 10 mile trips as well.

It really sounds like you just suffer from bike ADD like many of us.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:38 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trc.rhubarb View Post
If what you really want is to ride around in Jeans and a t-shirt, then just do it.
Doesn't require an Indian to do so.
I can tell you that a big cruiser is a fun bike and they are great at a lot of things but so is the GS.
That big Indian will be happiest eating hundreds of miles rather than 10 mile trips as well.

It really sounds like you just suffer from bike ADD like many of us.
Oh my friend, how I wish I could disagree with you but I simply can't... I have bad bike ADD, it's true. I blame the manufacturers for making TOO MANY really awesome motorcycles. It's like going to a buffet when you're starving and being told "You can only choose one dish." What we obviously need is some sort of motorcycle buffet payment plan.

I haven't ridden the road king, but I've ridden pretty much every other big bike Harley makes. The switchback feels like a great around town bike, but it's just a tad bit to small for me, being 6' and about 190. Another thing is riding with a pillion, the R1200GS is difficult for both the passenger and rider. Mrs. Zeid is certainly not big being 5'4 and about 120 but I hate seeing two full grown adults crammed on something like a sportster, comfort is a huge deal to me. So something like a road king or indian chief vintage "seems" like a viable option. She loves to ride with me as well, so a good two up bike is quite important. I've also discovered that while I love ripping up a trail or putting a knee down in the twisties, what joys me most is that afternoon ride on the perfect day without feeling like I need to hunt for trails and twisties which the GS beckons like a lighthouse on a foggy night. But at the same time, when I DO find time to take a trip you better believe I will do so, all geared up and fully prepared and I want a bike that can keep up.

Also, I'd never go so far as riding in Sandals. A good pair of thick blue jeans and T-shirt possibly with boots and "maybe" a pair sneakers is about as skimpy as I'd go. I'm well aware the risk it presents, but I've known so many people who've gotten broken and shattered bones under all the gear, it doesn't make you invincible so I guess while riding down these nearby roads and down to the store, I feel confident in two decades of road riding experience makes my chances quite well but will fully admit, so many things can happen when we least expect, are best prepared at any time. I just remember one day having a minor heat stroke in all my gear riding down the street and wondering how counter productive it was being for what I was doing. I'd never go cross country without it though. I will never ever ride without a good full face helmet though, that goes without saying.

Zeid screwed with this post 09-15-2013 at 09:45 PM
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Old 09-16-2013, 12:43 AM   #9
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I want them all!

I was wanting a smaller touring rig, so I started looking at the Switchback (I'm 5'10" with short 29" troll legs so it fit). Then I started thinking that, like you, I don't really do enough touring due to work to warrant spending that much money on a bike I wouldn't fully use.

Hemmed and hawed with myself and wound up getting a Bonneville. Perfect for around town, fine for touring with the gel seat should I get the time (actually, Grand Canyon and beyond this October I'm thinking).

I kept the klr just because I love it and, even though I don't get out enough, it's nice to have a bike that will at least take the fire roads.

Good luck with the decision! Keeping the beemer wouldn't be the worst thing I'm sure!

As a side note, there is an algebraic expression that will let you calculate how many bikes you actually need. it's x+1 where the value for x is the number of bikes you currently own.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:20 AM   #10
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I do not see any 'adventure' in riding a big modern bike anyplace, that is just riding to me.
Since when is it an adventure to ride a touring bike bike cross country?

For me, the bigger a bike gets, the less I tend to use it for short trips.
The same with gear, the more I have to put on, the less I will use the bike for short trips.

I no longer have the ability to do trips longer then a day, so I have a little easy to hop on bike (TU250) and in summer, the only gear I often wear is sunblock and a helmet.
I have a rack and tail bag, so very short shopping trips are easy and fun, put the helmet on, push the button, and go.

For nightime, I add a mesh jecket for bug protection.

I had a number of bigger bikes before the TU, never a turing bike, but ones that could long trips without any problem at any legal+ 5 mph speed.

I then figured out I had the wrong tool to have fun, since my riding time was limited, I needed something that was FUN to ride any time I had time.

For me, a big bike is NO fun unless you are breaking the law in serious ways. In NJ, you can not do that for very long before your wallet is empty and you are walking.

Enter the TU. After a very bad dirt crash on a dr650 (wrong tool for sand), I decided to get something small, light, easy and safe to ride, at least till all the bones healed.

Well, the bike is FUN! Pushing a little light bike to the max as much as you want (often) without getting in trouble is fun.
My wife is bigger then yours, and the bike does well 2 up (but not for touring), the bike does very well in the rain, does the interstate when needed, its easy to spin around in the garage (320 pounds wet), is comfortable enough for a 12 hour ride with an old man in the seat.

If I could, I think it would be a real adventure to ride it around the US, and some have done long trips on the bike.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...n/P1020964.jpg

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=907171

So maybe you need two bikes, a nice big 2 up touring bike, and some smaller bike to ride every day.

I get the idea some people would think a real adventure is going to starbucks with failed heated grips or something, while others think its no real adventure to bike camp cross country on a 250 with little money...
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Old 09-16-2013, 07:16 AM   #11
hugemoth
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On the money side, I've never had much so I always buy used bikes with the exception of the 200cc Lifan dual sport that I bought new for $1375. That's the bike I use around town and for exploring gravel roads. For longer rides on the highway my 32 year old Silverwing does just fine and has a big fairing and full hard luggage. Bought that one well used for $500 and rode it to Alaska this summer. Much better riding than the big old Goldwing I used to tour on. So while it's nice to have a new bike, old and cheap bikes can be just as enjoyable, and you don't have to worry about it being stolen or damaged.
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Old 09-16-2013, 10:24 AM   #12
NJ-Brett
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For $500.00, I would toss the bike in a ditch and take the bus home if I got a flat!
People spend more then that on boots!




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On the money side, I've never had much so I always buy used bikes with the exception of the 200cc Lifan dual sport that I bought new for $1375. That's the bike I use around town and for exploring gravel roads. For longer rides on the highway my 32 year old Silverwing does just fine and has a big fairing and full hard luggage. Bought that one well used for $500 and rode it to Alaska this summer. Much better riding than the big old Goldwing I used to tour on. So while it's nice to have a new bike, old and cheap bikes can be just as enjoyable, and you don't have to worry about it being stolen or damaged.

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Old 09-16-2013, 10:44 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
I get the idea some people would think a real adventure is going to starbucks with failed heated grips or something, while others think its no real adventure to bike camp cross country on a 250 with little money...

Thanks for the shout out. Having come back from that trip, and still riding my bike for a commute of <5m (bicycle needs some work), I want to just pick up and go again. Maybe I'll be able to get some days in October strung together to take a weekend out to the mountains in PA, just no trying to ride Sophia through small ponds anymore.
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Old 09-16-2013, 12:07 PM   #14
NJ-Brett
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Ponds are ok, you just need the right tires.



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Thanks for the shout out. Having come back from that trip, and still riding my bike for a commute of <5m (bicycle needs some work), I want to just pick up and go again. Maybe I'll be able to get some days in October strung together to take a weekend out to the mountains in PA, just no trying to ride Sophia through small ponds anymore.
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Old 09-16-2013, 12:31 PM   #15
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Oh, and I think its a bit mad to go into Indian debt for a new bike.
That is big bucks, and it does not take big bucks to have fun on motorcycles.
Maybe its great if you had loads of exta cash around to get some high end new bike, but to go into big time debt is no fun.
Loan payment, insurance, maintanace, big bike MPG, big bike tires, all loads of cash, and then you have to worry about scratches, dings, rust.

I always thought it was silly for someone to drop $30,000.00 into a bike when you can have so much fun on a much cheaper bikes.

I think the best most fun bikes I have had were all under $3000.00 new and used.
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