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Old 04-19-2013, 07:29 AM   #16
LoJack
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Making them is easy enough, sure, I just lived in the same town as Jeff and picked up a few other things at the same time. He's a good guy to support.
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:01 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Stan_R80/7 View Post
FWIW, plug grounding synchronizing was something I learned from the internet and works well for me.
I need some tips on how to do the grounding technique. I sounds simple and straight-forward but I was struggling to get it right. From what I have read, it should be a very accurate method to balance carbs.
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:25 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by craydds View Post
I need some tips on how to do the grounding technique. I sounds simple and straight-forward but I was struggling to get it right. From what I have read, it should be a very accurate method to balance carbs.
Try:

http://www.eskimo.com/~newowl/settin..._CV_carbs.html
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:40 AM   #19
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Thanks, Plaka!
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:55 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by craydds View Post
Send me your Harmonizer. Let me give it a try.
No way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by craydds View Post
I'd be willing to try the "harmonizer" as some think it is GREAT, but others (Tom Cutter) say don't waste your money - to each his own.
Tome Cutter has to be the biggest naysayer in the Beemer universe. I wonder what his reasoning was?? I don't feel like going to Airlist and wading thru all his posts to find out.

Quote:
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No vacuum port on the slide carbs of my /5, which is why I got those carb sync rods.
No room in the slide-valve carbs for vacuum fittings, so I drilled and tapped them into the intake ports of my /5.



I can balance by the shorting method close enough, but the Harmonizer gives that little edge to smoothness. And is quicker and easier.

--Bill
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Bill Harris screwed with this post 04-19-2013 at 11:08 AM
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Old 04-19-2013, 09:01 AM   #21
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Man, I love snow days in April...
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Old 04-19-2013, 09:24 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post
If you're going to get creative with an Arduino, why stay in the past by measuring vacuum? It's only a surrogate for smooth operation; these days we can measure the crank speed itself to figure out if it's running smoothly. That's what the Hexheads do

Set a HES so that it reads the flywheel teeth, and then program the Arduino to compare alternate rotations. You will see the power pulse show up as crank acceleration, and you want the same acceleration on successive rotations.
Good idea anton. The hall effect sensor goes low when the trigger passes so it would make sense to piggyback the existing hes in the bean can. Minor variations in throttle positions would upset the readings though, wouldn't you need to take the throttle position into account if messing crank speed?
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Old 04-19-2013, 09:25 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
I swear by 'em, and mine are just home made. The little ones go in the tool kit and the big fancy home made ones live in the shop. I was going to make a cross shorting box but the project got stalled by a move and I ended up doing something different in the end.

If you travel far I think you should at least know how to do it and be somewhat in practice. it's extremely portable, gives good results and doesn't take batteries.

I'd appreciate a demonstration.
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Old 04-19-2013, 10:16 AM   #24
Stan_R80/7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craydds View Post
I need some tips on how to do the grounding technique. I sounds simple and straight-forward but I was struggling to get it right. From what I have read, it should be a very accurate method to balance carbs.
Here is Snowbums complete discussion on the topic, including using vacuum methods: http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/synchcarbs.htm


Actually, I have never used a Harmonizer - and neither my flat top carbs or heads have vacuum take off points. While I could readily modify the heads or carbs to add some, I prefer the illusion of keeping the bike stock. YMMV.
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Old 04-19-2013, 10:35 AM   #25
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I've read several descriptions of the shorting method, but some were so detailed that I lost sight of the core procedure. Here's my very high-level synopsis. Has worked for me, but YMMV. I made the tools from extra plug nipples and a piece of threaded rod.

Make sure each throttle cable has some slack at idle

On warm, running engine, adjust idle mixture

1. Synch at Idle
  • Short one side, then the other
  • Adjust idle speed screw (on carb) so that each side is running at same RPM when other side is shorted
2. Synch at Speed
  • Twist throttle to take up slack in cables (2k-3k RPM)
  • Hold throttle position (my bike has a screw on the throttle grip housing that will hold throttle position when tightened)
  • Short one side, then the other
  • Adjust cables until each side runs at same speed when other side is shorted.
Release throttle, turn off engine

Remove shorting tools

Be careful about letting the bike run too long while standing still. Some use a fan to provide airflow. Only takes a few minutes once you get the hang of it.
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Old 04-19-2013, 10:59 AM   #26
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I like mine.

I've done a balance with a home made differential manometer since I bought the bike. Through ham-fistedness (is that a word?) I've managed to have the bike ingest transmission fluid a couple times. I was always happy with the results. Enter the Harmonizer.

When I hooked it up the first time, it was barely within spec according to the new tool (smily face lit up.) I managed to get it even closer to perfect balance. I adjusted the idle air screws for max vacuum, repeated, and rode. By the way, I'd never had a vacuum gauge to do this last adjustment before. I had done it old school, screw in to stumble, screw out to stumble, go half way between.

I always thought the BMW boxers were smooth. Well, after this, it was like riding a flying carpet. It was smoooooooth. Never been that smooth before. Easy starting, comes to an unassisted idle quicker, and just generally happy. I on the other hand may end up getting a "performance award" since my physical feedback (vibrations) have almost all gone away!
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:14 AM   #27
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Great

Quote:
Originally Posted by More_Miles View Post
I like mine.

I've done a balance with a home made differential manometer since I bought the bike. Through ham-fistedness (is that a word?) I've managed to have the bike ingest transmission fluid a couple times. I was always happy with the results. Enter the Harmonizer.

When I hooked it up the first time, it was barely within spec according to the new tool (smily face lit up.) I managed to get it even closer to perfect balance. I adjusted the idle air screws for max vacuum, repeated, and rode. By the way, I'd never had a vacuum gauge to do this last adjustment before. I had done it old school, screw in to stumble, screw out to stumble, go half way between.

I always thought the BMW boxers were smooth. Well, after this, it was like riding a flying carpet. It was smoooooooth. Never been that smooth before. Easy starting, comes to an unassisted idle quicker, and just generally happy. I on the other hand may end up getting a "performance award" since my physical feedback (vibrations) have almost all gone away!
That's the sort of endorsement I was looking for. Too bad you are on the other side of the country.

Anybody closer to me( Vancouver, BC ), have one ?

I think the next production run on these is scheduled for May.
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:17 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by craydds View Post
I'd be willing to try the "harmonizer" as some think it is GREAT, but others (Tom Cutter) say don't waste your money - to each his own.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
Tome Cutter has to be the biggest naysayer in the Beemer universe. Iwinder hweat is reasoning was?? I don't feel like going to Airlist and wading thru all his posts to find out.
Just for the sake of completeness, here's the content of an email Mr. Cutter sent to the Airlist (to which I subscribe) on Feb 15, 2012.

Quote:
Subject: HARMONIZER synchronizer test-early results
Prezzi and Hedz;

During the discussion on carburetor and throttle body synchronization on the IBMWR list, I mentioned that I had ordered the HARMONIZER from "Grok" on the ADVrider list*. Several people emailed me to ask that I post my impressions of the tool.

The Harmonizer arrived by mail today (big points for rapid delivery!) I was occupied with other projects in preparation for the industry convention (DealerExpo in Indianapolis tomorrow through Sunday) so I only had a few minutes to try the Harmonizer. I just grabbed the closest running motorcycle, which happened to be my old 1978 R100/7(S) Airhead. That bike has recently had a complete motor refresh with new valves, timing chain. pistons, etc., etc. I figured that would be a good stable test platform.

I warmed the engine up on the stand for a bit (no time to take a ride,) shut off the engine and turned on the Harmonizer, waited for the self-calibration cycle to complete, and connected it to the vacuum ports on the 40mm carbs (not OEM). Started the engine and watched the Harmonizer readout . It used an LCD screen to show the vacuum imbalance in millibars, along with a digital RPM readout and a battery condition indicator.

First observation was that the Harmonizer RPM readout disagreed with my BMW electronic tachometer by about 350-400 RPM, he disparity increasing with higher RPM. Since I have long suspected my on-bike tach of some small dishonesty, I'll wait until I have a calibrated tachometer to determine whether either is actually inaccurate. For purposes of this test, I set the bike to idle at a readout of 910 RPM on the Harmonizer (1250 readout on the BMW tach) and was able to "refine" the synchronization somewhat from where it was previously. I don't recall when I last tuned and synched that bike, but at least three months and about 800 miles or so ago. Since the motor is still in a break-in phase, I am not surprised that it took some re-balancing.

Synchronizing was quite easy and intuitive with the Harmonizer, which is good because it came with no instructions of any kind, other than a permanent sticker on the unit. The bike runs well and pulls smoothly off idle. The results were better than with previously-used carb synchronizer tools, but I will wait to do a head-to-head comparison of all the available synchronizer before I declare a winner in this niche.

First Impression: It works well, There was enough fluctuation in the readout for me to know that it was actually giving me a good sample, and I was able to induce a lot of fluctuation by altering the spark to one cylinder, so it would be useful for that diagnosis, too.

I intend to do a full test and review of the four-cylinder Harmonizer unit when those come to market in the next few months. That review will be in the RaceLine column of the BMWMOA ON.

Grok's website is not yet up and running, as he is in the introductory phase with this product, but for now the Harmonizer is available from Grok via this link: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=701625 Introductory price is $109 plus S&H ($10 USA, $20 International) Price will be higher when full production and the website are up and going.

--
Tom Cutter
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"Some people find fault as if there's a reward for it.”
Unless my Thunderbird-fu is greatly in error or I have a bunch of missing email from the archive (digital packrat!) that's the only thing I can find that Mr. Cutter had to say on the subject of the Harmonizer.
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:23 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
No way.

Tome Cutter has to be the biggest naysayer in the Beemer universe. I wonder what his reasoning was?? I don't feel like going to Airlist and wading thru all his posts to find out.

I can balance by the shorting method close enough, but the Harmonizer gives that little edge to smoothness. And is quicker and easier.

--Bill
I have to agree most times with what TC says and he provides much more info in his posts than other posters. But I must have missed his pronouncements on the Harmonizer. That's too bad. The Harmonizer works for me.
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:15 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by More_Miles View Post
Unless my Thunderbird-fu is greatly in error or I have a bunch of missing email from the archive (digital packrat!) that's the only thing I can find that Mr. Cutter had to say on the subject of the Harmonizer.
That appears to be a favorable review of the Harmonizer by T. Cutter. If my memory serves me correctly, I'd swear I read some info where Tom concluded something like, "Save your money...". But, I could be wrong, don't want to put words in his mouth; guess I could send him an email and get clarification.
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