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Old 05-03-2013, 01:13 AM   #16
Zuber
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Gustavo, your rim is a bad example for future generations.
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:37 AM   #17
Joe Pichler
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Your rim is not too bad, I would do nothing.
I bended the front rims a couple of times.
But it was really bad in the Danakil Dessert in Ethiopia.




No change to repair it, but I was riding back to Addis 1.500 km without problems.
Joe
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Old 05-03-2013, 05:08 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Joe Pichler View Post
Your rim is not too bad, I would do nothing.
I bended the front rims a couple of times.
But it was really bad in the Danakil Dessert in Ethiopia.




No change to repair it, but I was riding back to Addis 1.500 km without problems.
Joe
If you decide to fix the rim yourself, after hammering a little bit, heat the area very well. That will let the molecules adjust. This prevents cracking as you bend it more by more hammering.
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:30 AM   #19
Gustavo.Ramos
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thats a respectable bend!

What about the rest of the rim for the remaining 1500kms?
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:45 AM   #20
Joe Pichler
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I couldn’t repair the rim. So I had to ride 1500 km back to Addis with the bended and broken rim.
And not only tarmac. 500 km have been sand and gravel.
But the rim didn’t change until Addis, good stuff.

Joe
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:44 AM   #21
Rockwell OP
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If you decide to fix the rim yourself, after hammering a little bit, heat the area very well. That will let the molecules adjust. This prevents cracking as you bend it more by more hammering.
I was wondering about applying heat. If I took a blowtorch to it, I should be able to tap it back into a bit better shape?
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Old 05-07-2013, 05:10 AM   #22
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I was wondering about applying heat. If I took a blowtorch to it, I should be able to tap it back into a bit better shape?
If its not bent too much I say stay away from blow torch. Just put a towvel on the area and hammer it back into shape.
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Old 05-07-2013, 05:39 AM   #23
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I've positioned an acetylene rich torch ( no O2) on the affected area and let it heat until carbon deposited on the rim from the acetylene begins to burn and peel off. Then with the rim braced, beat it back carefully with brass hammers and wood. I clamp rims to the frame of my hydraulic press for this sort of thing.

That said, this will totally ruin the metals temper and it'll be softer for the next bump.

Sporting Wood screwed with this post 05-07-2013 at 10:04 AM
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Old 05-07-2013, 10:02 AM   #24
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Any tips on spoke tensions? I've read or been told to listen for a specific sound, but I am not exactly sure what that frequency would be. Also, I only have a traditional spoke wrench (without a torque function).
You wanna be careful with that. I say you don't need a torque wrench u just need to know what your doing.The higher the sound the more tension in your rims. If your wheel is straight and you do have some low sound spokes you need to count the turns you apply to the spoke you're adding tension and do the same for the rest of them. I have a friend how read about adjusting the tension on the wheels and failed miserably so my advice is do nothing if you don't really understand how it works. Let me know if you need more help on that.
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Old 05-07-2013, 10:45 AM   #25
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Sometimes I get damages like really "open" rim. I put the rim (without tyre) on the large and flat block of wood (as railway sleepers). I put on top of rim the flat hard piece of wood and use a big hammer. After the repair you will not find some crooked sectors of rim.
P.S. Of course, sometimes it is necessary to check the rim for cracks.
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:06 PM   #26
licascurtu
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Whatever you do don't spend money on fixing a stock rim, put that money towards a new Excel rim. The stock are way to soft. I run a one size narrower front 1.85 Excel not the stock 2.15 and you don't sacrifice on road performance but definitely improve the off road performance and the life of the rim. Same goes for the rear.
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:11 AM   #27
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I straightened my front rim using a hydraulic press, obviously to do this you need to take the wheel off the bike. But the poster above is right - save up for an excel :) I've now got 1.85 front and 2.5 rear, a definite improvement off road.
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Old 05-08-2013, 04:29 AM   #28
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Yes get an Excel lol
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=811952

If that was the stock rim, i wouldn't been able to ride back home. That rim is also superlaced by Woodys works. I made the mistake of not getting the 1.85 or 1.6

I hammered it back in,... very very tough rim
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