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Old 05-07-2013, 02:06 PM   #46
redog1
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Laugh Very nice...

Thank you for sharing. Nice pics!
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Old 05-08-2013, 04:39 PM   #47
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Great way to start my day with this read and picture gawking
Thanks and I always enjoy starting my day with an installment by you or Moe.Ron in your thread: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=853509

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Hadn't checked in Day trippin for a while.

What a Nice find!
I'm glad you found it.


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Thank you for sharing. Nice pics!
Thanks
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Old 05-08-2013, 04:50 PM   #48
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Finally made it to Furnace Creek for breakfast.


They have a wagon on display too.


No food pictures but it was surprisingly good, a bit spendy but very good, I enjoyed the meal and a nice cup of hot coffee. After breakfast I wanted to take a walk and the Borax Museum was a nice place for a little stroll.

Borax Museum – the building is the oldest structure in Death Valley.


It doesn’t look that old but that’s what the brochure said.


There are a lot of interesting pieces to look at in the outdoor displays.




There is a guide with information about all the artifacts just match the number and read all about it.








Some things looked like torture devices












I enjoyed the nice stroll around Furnace creek to let me breakfast settle and even visited the gift shop and bought myself a t-shirt and a gift for a friend.
I was drawn to the display of sand paintings and what they are used for.


The day was warming up nicely.


Golf anyone?


Wanted a post office shot for this thread: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=143102&page=43


Furnace Creek was full of tourists but it was my touristy day so I was OK with it. To get away from the “crowds” in Death Valley doesn’t take much. The ranger said that week was the busiest week in the Park. Note to self: Visit DV at a different time of year next time…..I’m thinking Nov. 2014 will be my next visit.

A visit to the National Park visitor’s center was next to watch a film about the park. I wanted to pick up a map and some information about DV too however after standing in line for about 10 minutes I was told they couldn’t help me unless I showed them my receipt for park admission. My receipt was out on the bike and I didn’t want the map bad enough to go get it and wait in line again. I was a little frustrated but they need to do what they can to be sure people are paying their admittance fees for the park. I didn’t need my receipt to watch the film so I went and enjoyed the 20 minute film.





A gal I met at work a few years ago is a member of the Timbisha Shoshone tribe however she has never been to the Village even though she attends council meetings held in Las Vegas. The Timbisha Shoshone people being featured in the film were of special interest to me as I was headed to their Village next.

The Timbisha Shoshone Indians lived here for centuries before the first white man entered the valley. They hunted and followed seasonal migrations for harvesting of pinyon pine nuts and mesquite beans with their families. To them, the land provided everything they needed and many areas were, and are, considered to be sacred places.

In January, 2000 the Timbisha Shoshone Homeland Act was implemented, officially providing land in trust to the Tribe on which the Tribe can live permanently and govern the Tribe's affairs within the ancestral homeland of the Tribe outside and within the Park. Today a partnership between the tribe and the National Park Service ensures resources within the park and their traditional homeland are protected and enhanced by cooperative activities.

I find it sad that Native Americans have to fight to be able to stay on the lands they lived on for centuries. I have a lot more thoughts on that subject but this isn’t the time or place so lets go visit the Timbisha Village instead.








The Village is small but kept up nicely much better than some of the villages in the NW.




After a ride through the Timbisha Shoshone Village it was time to ride to the next point of interest.

More of day 4 coming……
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:24 AM   #49
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Next up more sight seeing


Looks just like the picture on the sign


Zabriskie Point: Surrounded by a maze of wildly eroded and vibrantly colored badlands, this spectacular view is one of the park’s most famous. Zabriskie Point is a popular sunrise and sunset viewing location. The viewpoint is a short walk uphill from the parking area.

I was so intrigued by the view I don’t remember the uphill walk.






Christian Brevoort Zabriskie (1864–1936) was born at Fort Bridger, Wyoming Territory. Zabriskie’s life took on new meaning in 1885 when F.M. Smith hired him to supervise several hundred Chinese workers at the Columbus Marsh area of the Pacific Coast Borax Company near Candelaria. This was the beginning of a life-long career in the field of Borax. He ultimately became vice president and general manager of the company and served in that capacity for thirty-six years until his retirement in 1933. During this time, the Pacific Coast Borax Company had phased out most of its borax operations in the Caldelaria vicinity but had moved on the greater production in the Death Valley area.
All this occurred long before 1933, when the area became Death Valley National Monument, but Zabriskie Point remains to honor a man who devoted many years of service to the Pacific Coast Borax Company.

Even though the road I was riding is a main paved road it didn’t have any traffic on it and the ride was very enjoyable as I rode from one tourist point to another. I even stopped to enjoy the flowers along the way.




No matter how many times I have seen flowers growing in the desert I’m still amazed at how the pretty delicate little things can survive and thrive in such a harsh environment. Just like us ladies they are pretty but tough as nails.



A stop at this viewpoint is totally different from the last one. Around every corner in Death Valley things change just like magic.


Dante’s View: The most breathtaking viewpoint in the park, this mountain-top overlook is more than 5000 feet above the inferno of Death Valley.

That’s Badwater down there.


This viewpoint was busy so I didn’t stay long.

An enjoyable ride was taking me to the next place of interest.






That’s one big hunk of rock that fell from somewhere.


Before I do more touristing I better take a side trip back to Furnace Creek and fuel up with their expensive gas.


The gas at the campground was the same price. Stovepipe Wells the gas was a little cheaper but not much. I brought gas with me so that was the only time I filled up in the park. Thank goodness.

I was headed for Badwater but I saw this and had to stop.


The parking lot was full so I parked the Superbug off to the side and out of the way so I could go take a walk. Surprisingly even with the parking lot full the canyon wasn’t.


A road once entered Golden Canyon, but what has destroyed the pavement here? In Feb. 1976, a four-day storm dropped 2.3 inches of rain at Furnace Creek. On the last day of the storm, a violent downpour caused a surge of water, mud, and rock to flow through these narrows.

Such sediment-laden flood work like sandpaper, cutting away and undermining the rocky canyon walls. In narrows such as these, floodwaters are constricted and the speed increases.

Flash floods like these have been shaping the canyons of Death Valley for millions of years.






Then I noticed this off to the side and decided to go explore.








Like motorcycling it was easier going up than it was coming down.


That stuff was loose and slick.


A little of the remaining roadbed from 1976


The Devil plays golf in Death Valley? I guess even the Devil needs a little recreation now and then.




Still headed to Badwater and there’s another big hunk of rock that fell from somewhere.


Finally made it to Badwater


Badwater was the busiest of the tourist attractions for some reason. It was an interesting stop but the others were much better looking.




I walked out on the salt walk quite a ways because, well because everyone else was doing it. About ¾ of the way out I realized there was nothing more to see out there so why go all the way to the end.


As I was walking back to the parking lot I noticed these little girls playing. The older one over on the left got the younger ones to twirl around and around. They were twirling and giggling happily. The little girl in the pink wasn’t with that group but she was watching and the look on her face said she wanted to be with them and she started to giggle and twirl. The innocents of children, I love it, they were having so much fun doing such a simple thing.



I started to continue riding South but then realized I better not go much further or I would be getting back to camp after dark and I don’t like riding after dark. I still had one more touristy thing I wanted to do too.



Artist’s Drive: Scenic loop drive through multi-hued volcanic and sedimentary hills. Artist’s Palette is especially photogenic in late afternoon light. The 9-mile paved road is one-way and is only drivable with vehicles less than 25 feet in length.



The road twists, turns and dips through colorful hills.
























And back down to Badwater basin


Then it was the ride back to camp and watching as the sun was dropping further and further.


I made it back just before dark and was able to watch the nice sunset.


Then see the full moon rise.


The end of this visit to DV is about here. But there are still more pictures to come.......

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Old 05-09-2013, 09:38 AM   #50
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Interesting report...Outstanding pics and narration.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:40 AM   #51
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Good stuff, Sherry!!!

You're showing me the side of the park that I never see.
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Old 05-09-2013, 12:45 PM   #52
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Beautiful!

Thank you for sharing your photos and perspective.
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Old 05-09-2013, 01:21 PM   #53
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Fantastic Foto's !! Can't wait to go there later this year or early next.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:14 AM   #54
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Interesting report...Outstanding pics and narration.
Thanks.


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Good stuff, Sherry!!!

You're showing me the side of the park that I never see.
You never see those parts of DV because you are out exploring parts of the valley none of us see.

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Beautiful!

Thank you for sharing your photos and perspective.
Thank you

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Fantastic Foto's !! Can't wait to go there later this year or early next.
I hope you have a great time.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:16 AM   #55
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I'm going to take a break from the report for a few days to go riding but I will be back the first of the week to finish it up.
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Old 05-12-2013, 08:10 PM   #56
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Great report and you sunrise photos are great
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Old 05-13-2013, 04:00 AM   #57
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Great report and you sunrise photos are great
Thanks
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Old 05-13-2013, 04:15 AM   #58
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Going Home - Friday 3/29/13
After a shower and dinner I was off to bed. There were plenty of people partying at the campfire but sleep was more appealing.

The next morning as I walked in to the ladies room I could hear someone in the men’s room puking their guts out. Yup, there it is, the reason the party at the camp fire wasn’t all that appealing.

Even though I had signed up and paid for the rally the reason I was there was to see Death Valley. Everyone was having a good time at the rally but I needed to head home so I packed up for the trip back.

The Superbug logged a few miles on this adventure so I didn't feel short changed with leaving early.


Now the Superbug would take a break and ride in the back of the pickup on the way home.

I took my time loading up, said my good byes to Moto-Treks and I was off.

Even though I was headed home I planned to take my time and see some things along the way.

First up is Scotty’s Castle


I suspect Larryboy’s daughter Megan would like this door. She had a door thing going when she rode to DV with her dad.




I was here before and checked out the grounds but didn’t take the tour. This time I was taking the tour. The ranger would go in and out of character as he did the tour as a living history. If his hat was off he was Ranger Steve.


If his hat was on he was Scotty’s friend Steve.


The Castle didn’t belong to Scotty it belonged to a friend of his who let him live his entire life there. Pretty cool friend.

This is another place with so much to see.




Time to go in and check it out.


The first thing that caught my eye was the massive chandelier.


Then I was having a difficult time taking my eyes off this bowl. It was magnificent.








In every nook, cranny and corner there was something incredible to look at.


There was this modern looking fireplace and next to it was a 400 year old chest.






In the music room there is this player organ. Ranger Steve started it up and it played a happy tune that reminded me of being a child and going to an amusement park that had organ music playing. It was fun hearing it.


The fine china


Glassware


And the every day dishes




A collection of baskets woven by Timbisha Shoshone Indians.


A daybed with a writing table


So much to see, up, down and around.












The tour was complete but I continued on and took a walk around the grounds. I followed a nice little stream.


Found Scotty’s old car in the Stable.


Since we don’t have palm trees in the Pacific Northwest I enjoy seeing them. I have gotten better though since the first time I saw one in Daytona Beach, FL when I walked over and petted it. Yep, tourist was blazing over my head in big neon lights. I don’t pet them any more but I still take pictures of them.




I went up to the clock tower but it was closed for repairs so I didn’t get to go up into it.


The place is very lovely but it was never finished or at least not the planned finish. You can see the start of foundations here for sections that weren’t done.




The swimming pool, oh the swimming pool. It is HUGE but it wasn’t completed.
This is just half of the pool. I continues down through those arches to the shallow end. I don’t know for sure how deep it is on this end but it looked about 15-20 feet to me.

Scotty’s Castle
Hidden in the green oasis of Grapevine Canyon in far northern Death Valley, the Death Valley Ranch, or Scotty's Castle as it is more commonly known, is a window into the life and times of the Roaring '20s and Depression '30s. It was and is an engineer's dream home, a wealthy matron's vacation home and a man-of-mystery's hideout and getaway.

Walter Scott, Death Valley Scotty, convinced everyone that he had built the castle with money from his rich secret mines in the area. Albert Mussey Johnson actually built the house as a vacation getaway for himself and his wife Bessie. Scotty was the mystery, the cowboy, and the entertainer, but he was also a friend. Albert was the brains and the money. Two men as different as night and day, from different worlds and with different visions - who shared a dream.


I spent more time at the castle than I thought I would but I thoroughly enjoyed it. There is also an underground tour, which I didn’t take so I need to return and do that one next. Yep, another reason to go back to Death Valley. Maybe that’s the magic of Death Valley, it keeps giving me reasons return.

I'll be back a little later with more from my adventure on the way home. . . . .
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Old 05-13-2013, 08:25 AM   #59
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Maybe that’s the magic of Death Valley, it keeps giving me reasons return.

Now you're catching on, careful...you'll go full desert before you know it.
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Old 05-14-2013, 03:58 AM   #60
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Now you're catching on, careful...you'll go full desert before you know it.
I sure do like the desert but I also like the forests and mountains so I have to do it all.
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