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Old 05-04-2013, 05:35 AM   #1
Bloodweiser OP
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Location: way over yonder in the minor key
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I bought a really old house.

Our first home,
we're on schedule to move in this month.


Taken during inspections with my old man.


It's a 2000 sq/ft farmhouse built in the early 1800s.
I'm fairly handy,
and have plenty of gumption;
but I'm still going to have tons of questions,
like how to fix this, repair that and what did I get myself into.


I've been working on bikes in the yard,
porches, bedrooms and alleys for 11 years.
And now finally, a workspace of my own.
Tears to my eyes.





Any good forums for older buildings in particular?
I don't want to clog up this place if people aren't interested in such a project.
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:03 AM   #2
LuciferMutt
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Congratulations! Looks like a beautiful piece of property!!! I think we will all be VERY interested -- especially in the restoration of that awesome shop

Buying old isn't all bad, by the way.

I would rather have a house the age of the one you bought, than this piece of shit I live in that was built in 1970. Early 70s construction is some of the worst I've ever seen. At least in the 1800s, they built houses with beefy components and they were built to last! Good luck with everything.
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:04 AM   #3
emti
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Congratulations, any history? Our place is /was an boarding house on a "Mill" lot. whats the details on it? Ballon framed? rubble basement walls? These were some interesting buildings. The words "square" and "plumb" were not used as frequently, of course some settling may have occured? Your barn /shop is in nice shape, Looks like a nice lot too. Have fun emti.
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:07 AM   #4
dfc
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Good luck Sir, my house is 1909 and has its own issues, I am currently having the chimney rebuilt. A lot of things I have found is the quality/sanity of the "upgrades" that PO's have made may make things more difficult. for instance my house had been partially wired using aluminum wire that was a fad in home wiring at one time, so I had to sort that out quickly.

I don't know of any real "really old house" resources, 'cept the web in general. I have enough experience in retrofit wiring,plumbing ,framing to get myself in and out of trouble, you may too very soon....
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:03 PM   #5
Bloodweiser OP
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I don't have history.
There's a deed from 1869 on the wall of the house,
that I haven't examined closely but did have it written in to our contract.
We haven't closed yet, next couple weeks.

It's going to need some roof repairs off the bat.
Metal needs to be prepped and painted,
some of the shingled sections need to be replaced.

**Does anyone have experience with painting metal roofs?
How to prep, what paint is good, etc.
This will be a sooner rather than later project.

The barn is going to be a woodshop/catchall for awhile.
If you check out the 1st pic,
there's an addition to the house closest to the barn -
that's where MC stuff is going to be.
Lady already gave me the go ahead on that one.
That means a heated space for the winter!

The barn's footings were recently replaced, and done nicely.
The joists there and for the basement are straight up trees,
still have the bark on em and everything. Super cool.

The basement is an old laid stone / dirt pile foundation.
It's settle a bit, and some of the floors are a bit slanty.
Mrs. wants me to get on this one pretty quick too I think.
It effects the 1st to 2nd floor stairs and that's her biggest qualm.

**I've got an idea or two on how to go about this,
but again, if anyone has experience/input please share.
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:45 PM   #6
rapidoxidationman
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Sounds like a couple of 20 ton bottle jacks are in your near future...

Take small bites. Make a list of your projects then prioritize that list then start knocking things off the list ONE BY ONE. If you start a bunch of projects at once it'll get overwhelming and your gumption will soon be misplaced along with a bunch of your tools
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:13 PM   #7
Bloodweiser OP
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^ our philosophy exactly.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:35 PM   #8
Al Tuna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post
^ our philosophy exactly.
Congratulations man! Get that barn "Rockin"

http://thecarrotseed.bandcamp.com/tr...-your-health-2
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:57 PM   #9
JimVonBaden
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The best forum for this is here: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/index.php

Jim
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:29 AM   #10
Al Tuna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
The best forum for this is here: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/index.php

Jim
Bless you're health Jim....
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:42 AM   #11
Stray Dog
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We bought an old house back in 2000
Built in the 1600's





How it looks now...



Good luck with your rebuild, only advice is be sympathetic to the original build.

Dog
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Old 05-05-2013, 04:48 AM   #12
Bloodweiser OP
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^that's cool.
What's the time difference between the before and after pics?

I'm going to treat this house
like most old bikes I've owned;
Clean it up as best I can,
replace the broken bits,
and keep it as original as possible.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:12 AM   #13
Tmaximusv
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Best advice is to stay away from a Home Depot for any sort of repair and maintenance supplies or advice. Not a bad place for recent construction but it doesn't work well to apply new techniques and equipment to old construction unless you're going to "start over" on a project - which always leads to another - which leads to another...DAMHIK

OTOH, you are in an area with lots of similar properties. Go to your local momandpop hardware store and get your own stool at the counter. Probably learn a lot from locals doing the same thing.

I wouldn't give up my older home for most of the newer. No substitute for character.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:47 AM   #14
BELSTAFF
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I hate Bob Villa

Back in the mid seventies, the better half got a burr for an ol' victorian.Found the perfect 2 story built in 1869---Let the games begin

"They don't build houses like they used too"--Thank the good Lord for that, scabbed 2x4s, square nails, no thought to supporting walls on 2nd story, plaster & lath used to square up a room, cardboard & tar paper for insulation wrap. Yep they don't build 'em like they used too. OH, speaking of plaster & lath, if you decide to remove any in favor of sheetrock, for god's sake wear a respirator, seems as much of ol'time plaster was made with horsehair & arsenic, a good case of arsenic poisoning and dust pneumonia will stop your production plans for a while

I could go on for days, but I suggest that you get an ol movie called "The Money Pit" w/ Tom Hanks & Shelley Long that will give you guys a good insight of what you're in for---trust me that film is true to life when renovating an oldie but goodie & when you're finished, ( if you're not divorced or on trial for murder) It will be something to be proud of.

In our case we made it through, finished it in about 5 yrs,sold it for a bundle & moved on. My wife is banned from watching "This Old House" & I still hate Bob Villa
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:38 AM   #15
rufus
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When you are doing any kind of tear out, DO IT ALL AT ONCE! Stop and COMPLETELY clean up your mess, then start putting in the new stuff.


DON'T, --as i have seen people do,-- tear the lath and plaster off 1 wall at a time. Do the whole room. Every tear out will make a lot of dust and mess. You will get disgusted with the mess. Plus it requires different tools. Constantly changing tools and moving things back and forth takes time and is aggravating.

If you were going to replace all of the wood trim, then tear it ALL out at once, clean up the mess, put those tools away, THEN start with the installation of the new stuff.

If you are completely redoing a bathroom, don't tear out just enough stuff to get the new tub in. Because then you will be working over a new tub. Gut the room back to the studs--CLEAN UP THE MESS--then start with the new stuff.

I have seen people tear out just enough lath and plaster to put in new cabinets, and then have to finish the tear out over new cabinets and counter tops.

Many people double or quadruple the amount of work they have to do because of poor planning.

PLAN AHEAD, tear out, clean up, install.......in that order. Clean up is important. Working in a mess is slower and harder and you WILL get sick i
of it.


Do floors last.

I am a tile setter. I just finished a nearly month long remodel. The first thing the homeowner did was refinish the hard wood floors. There was no cabinets, no trim, no paint, but they refinished the floors. By the time the house is done the floors will need to be refinished. AND it takes everyone there longer to do there job.
I have seen many many many many homeowners who ---"just want to see SOMETHING finished" ---have new carpet installed and then start painting and changing things over the new carpet.

PLAN

TEAR OUT

CLEAN UP

INSTALL.............in that order, every time.
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