ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-05-2013, 06:50 AM   #16
rufus
We're burning daylight...
 
rufus's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Location: Coweta Oklahoma
Oddometer: 3,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by BELSTAFF View Post

"They don't build houses like they used too"--Thank the good Lord for that,

I certainly agree with that. Some old houses are perfect in every way. Most aren't though. Finding a stud to nail into can sometimes be a nightmare. Pieces scabbed in sideways, stud spacing just eyeballed, scrap pieces scabbed on top of one another, no studs in the corners, no studs under a window. Instead of good techniques they relied on volume. In shower tear outs I have seen metal lath tied to bunch of irregular sized and spaced stud pieces and scabs. Then they put 1 1/2" of cement on the wall. It made things very solid, also very hard to tear out. But You don't need an inch and a half of concrete to hold up a 1/4 inch thick piece of tile.
rufus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 06:55 AM   #17
rufus
We're burning daylight...
 
rufus's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Location: Coweta Oklahoma
Oddometer: 3,986
If you don't have one, buy a 1/4 drive impact driver. I just bought a corded one from Lowes for $79. I like corded tools because it is easier quicker and cheaper to run a cord than to mess with batteries.
Old houses can have studs that you can't (literally) drive a nail into. An impact driver and a bunch of screws will pay for itself very quickly.
rufus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 07:28 AM   #18
stroming it softly
twins forever
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson
Oddometer: 178
Been there, done that

Redid a 1900 house, top to bottom-inside and out.
Best advice, develop a total plan start to finish and a timeline. Each part of your re-construction will affect the whole house so you need to have a plan, for instance, when I needed to straighten out the floors and staircase to the second floor I used bottle jacks and new beams in the basement, worked great and was very sturdy--but the plaster/lath wasn't yet removed from the second floor and during the jacking operation the loud cracking I heard was the plaster on the second floor cracking and falling off the walls! Removing the old plaster was the dirtiest job I have ever done, besides the dust/horsehair, etc. there was a hundred years of grime and crap in the stud spaces, looked like a coal miner each night when I cleaned up. It is also difficult to match the old and new framing as the old stuff is not dimension lumber like the new stuff you will use, easier in the long run to remove the whole wall/partition/whatever and just start over. It was a fun project though and we ended up with a very nice modern home that looked victorian. By the time you are done you will be a jack of all trades!
__________________
"Speed, it seems to me, provides the one genuinely modern pleasure". Aldous Huxley
stroming it softly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 07:53 AM   #19
tytek
Adventurer
 
tytek's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Oddometer: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by BELSTAFF View Post
Back in the mid seventies, the better half got a burr for an ol' victorian.Found the perfect 2 story built in 1869---Let the games begin

"They don't build houses like they used too"--Thank the good Lord for that, scabbed 2x4s, square nails, no thought to supporting walls on 2nd story, plaster & lath used to square up a room, cardboard & tar paper for insulation wrap. Yep they don't build 'em like they used too. OH, speaking of plaster & lath, if you decide to remove any in favor of sheetrock, for god's sake wear a respirator, seems as much of ol'time plaster was made with horsehair & arsenic, a good case of arsenic poisoning and dust pneumonia will stop your production plans for a while

I could go on for days, but I suggest that you get an ol movie called "The Money Pit" w/ Tom Hanks & Shelley Long that will give you guys a good insight of what you're in for---trust me that film is true to life when renovating an oldie but goodie & when you're finished, ( if you're not divorced or on trial for murder) It will be something to be proud of.

In our case we made it through, finished it in about 5 yrs,sold it for a bundle & moved on. My wife is banned from watching "This Old House" & I still hate Bob Villa
Amen to that! Old house = huge pain in the ass. Never again for me.

And, plaster walls and ceilings are so unbelievably heavy... it takes a long time to dispose of small volumes of it due to the weight. Be prepared for it.

Insulating the structure from the inside should be your priority. It will make for a much more pleasant living. Spend the time and money to do it right. Your spouse will thank you for that.

Good luck and hope you have lots of cash to dump into the place. And remember, sometimes it is cheaper to use a professional than when trying to do tricky work yourself.
tytek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 08:06 AM   #20
Foot dragger
singletracker
 
Foot dragger's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
Oddometer: 12,760
There's a paint used for metal roofs,its silvery looking and is like an asphalt based paint,gotta nail all the nails down,patch any thing that looks funny and then spray the silver paint on,it sticks better to light rust then clean metal as I remember.

Old houses are way cooler then new wafer board short lived crapola.
I did re-models for 8 years or so and always liked working on the old ones better and learned more about them.

Leveling them is an aquired art,gotta go slow and careful checking as you go so as to not crack things. There are many tricks and techniques that only an old time guy would know.

I like that shop building,lotsa possibilities there.
__________________
Some bikes around at times
Foot dragger is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 09:21 AM   #21
Stray Dog
Adventurer
 
Stray Dog's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: Angouleme France
Oddometer: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post
^that's cool.
What's the time difference between the before and after pics?
.
About 4 years, although I had a year out after a Bike accident in 2001.
We moved in full time in spring 2003
It certainly was a love/hate thing.
Most of it I loved, but some of it.......Grrrrrrr
But to finally bring the old house back to life was worth every minute.


Dog
Stray Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 09:29 AM   #22
LoJack
Beastly Adventurer
 
LoJack's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: B.G., yo!
Oddometer: 1,396
Subscribed.

I'm actually going to look at a house built in 1869 soon. It seems to be fairly neglected, though, so we'll see.
LoJack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 06:16 PM   #23
Honkey Cat
Tailights Fade!
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: SW Florida
Oddometer: 1,064
house

sweet homestead, alot of work, but worth it, where in upstate NY?
__________________
My favorite philosopher is Cha Ching !
Honkey Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 06:40 PM   #24
seniorasi
Banned
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Edge of the light
Oddometer: 816
Rebuilds

Renovated a few! Decide up front what you want to accomplish. Winters can be harsh in upstate New York. Heating oil is expensive. My first concerns would be windows, wiring,and insulation, after making it water tight. Living in a house while renovating is a nightmare so have a plan and modify as needed. If possible start in the kitchen, then the bath. If you have the time and money doing these two rooms prior to move in would be ideal. Best of luck. Any specific questions feel free to ask.
seniorasi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 06:44 PM   #25
seniorasi
Banned
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Edge of the light
Oddometer: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by rufus View Post
If you don't have one, buy a 1/4 drive impact driver. I just bought a corded one from Lowes for $79. I like corded tools because it is easier quicker and cheaper to run a cord than to mess with batteries.
Old houses can have studs that you can't (literally) drive a nail into. An impact driver and a bunch of screws will pay for itself very quickly.
Impact driver? What's he working on a car or a house?
seniorasi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 07:01 PM   #26
LoJack
Beastly Adventurer
 
LoJack's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: B.G., yo!
Oddometer: 1,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by seniorasi View Post
Impact driver? What's he working on a car or a house?
Every carpenter I know uses a Makita impact driver, so I got one a few years. It's incredibly handy. Having the little spot light that comes on when you hit the trigger is nice, too.
LoJack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 07:12 PM   #27
viverrid
not dead yet
 
Joined: Jan 2004
Location: Western Mass
Oddometer: 30,482
Lotta great old homes in Upstate. I used to own one in Brunswick, NY that we never dated definitively but was definitely a pre-revolutionary Dutch house. It was part of a little hamlet of similar era houses with farms fanning out from them (none of this rectangular boundary stuff like in the midwest & west). Another house in the hamlet was taken down piece by piece and rassembled at one of those historic village recreations.
__________________
Advanced pancreatic cancer found 04/2010. Have outlived +/- 97% of patients with this diagnosis, but 08/2013 cancer now in liver, vascular system and lungs with 20+ lung tumors. Sick/weak sometimes, not riding much. No more treatments & now under Hospice care.
viverrid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 07:17 PM   #28
Nesbocaj
Politicians suck
 
Nesbocaj's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Westchester NY
Oddometer: 838
My house was built in 1927

Like was said: plan, repair roof(s), gut the place once instead of many little separate times, level it, rewire and plumb as needed, replace windows and doors and insulate as you afford to do so, the heating savings return is super. Then worry about the finish work. Test your well!
__________________
2014 BMW R1200GS-W


Nesbocaj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 08:54 PM   #29
Steigs
Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: Sin City
Oddometer: 70
Congrats! Looks like a nice piece of property.

Depending on your needs, anytime you're gonna have the walls open is a great opportunity to think about pulling additional wiring for tv, network, in-wall/in-ceiling speakers, etc. Having a central area that you can have the tv/network/phone lines all run back to from each room is ideal as well.

You might consider looking into some of the DIY automation systems available too. Having a house than can manage it's energy usage and save $$ while being transparent to you and your family is handy. You can control just about any system (lights, heat/ac, sprinklers, garage doors, tv's, stereo systems, shades, alarms, cameras, deadbolts, etc) from your phone, a touchscreen or a simple wall switch.

Happy hammering!
Steigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 06:26 AM   #30
CallMeBoog
Done
 
CallMeBoog's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia
Oddometer: 5,523
congratulations on the house. You will hate it before you love it again.

My shanty was built in 1859, a scant 3200 square foot 3 storey 6 bedroom victorian. we bought it for a song and have spent 5 years renovating it. It's **ALMOST** done - just some trimwork...well all of the trimwork. it had no insulation, old knob & tube wiring, the plaster was being held to the wall with the wallpaper, and the original single pane windows. it's come a long way. I still hate it, but I'll love it again soon...

good luck, and just keep your eye on the prize.
__________________
Don't Ride With Nate!

CallMeBoog is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014