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Old 05-09-2013, 04:06 AM   #16
hooliken
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Lesson learned. I give the bike a quick once over everytime I get on it. I have been in similiar situations in the past.

Please warn us if and when your boss does decide to start riding.....
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:22 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliken View Post
Lesson learned. I give the bike a quick once over everytime I get on it. I have been in similiar situations in the past.

Please warn us if and when your boss does decide to start riding.....
Actually, if he was on a bike he would be more of danger to himself and less of a danger to everybody else than when he is driving his minivan- staying in one lane is optional, high speed and tailgaiting while on cell phone required- under normal circumstances I never get in his car- however, the only other person that drove by that I recognized- our veterinarian- just smiled and waved when I tried to flag him down- "uggg, it's one of those crazy customers"
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:26 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orangeyz View Post
actually, i think that "brake on the wheel that's not flat" is pretty well accepted as the right thing to do.
+1
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:27 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by LisaS View Post
Actually, if he was on a bike he would be more of danger to himself and less of a danger to everybody else than when he is driving his minivan- staying in one lane is optional, high speed and tailgaiting while on cell phone required- under normal circumstances I never get in his car- however, the only other person that drove by that I recognized- our veterinarian- just smiled and waved when I tried to flag him down- "uggg, it's one of those crazy customers"
Vet may have let you ride in the "doggie" cage in the back?

Didn't notice earlier that you are a fellow Mainiac! I grew up near Ellsworth.
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Old 05-09-2013, 06:26 AM   #20
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IMHO, the biggest lesson you learned is that not everything will cause you to crash. Anything can cause a crash, but doesn't necessarily have to. You used what time you had to stay sane and not panic. Commendable. You came out of it none the worse for wear, but perhaps wiser. Don't beat yourself up too badly. Walk away.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:46 AM   #21
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I would have copiously shit myself. As it ran down my legs it would have hopefully lowered the cog.
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Old 05-10-2013, 05:27 AM   #22
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In a car, if a tire suddenly fails, you're supposed to accelerate hard, but I don't remember why, I also doubt it would be the best thing to do on a bike
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:00 AM   #23
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You stayed upright so you did the right thing in my book . We all forget to look at our tires every now and then so dont beat your self up about , just remember to look at them more often
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:23 AM   #24
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Obviously, everything worked out fine so, congratulations! The one thing I gather from your post that might have made the experience less harrowing would have been to pull the clutch in as soon as the blowout occurred. When the blowout occurred, the wheel was being driven and then, when you rolled of the throttle (the correct thing to do) it was being dragged or at least it became a negative force slowing you down. If you had pulled the clutch in immediately, the rear tire would have been allowed to free-wheel and you could have used the front brakes more aggressively with less chance of the rear coming around. Had the tube wrapped around and locked-up the rear wheel, the clutch wouldn't have made any difference. It's always a good idea to disengage the clutch anytime there is a rear-wheel problem.
I had an instance where an engine siezed on me and locked the rear up at about 50mph. I instantly pulled the clutch and the rear-wheel released and I was able to stop normally and pull off the road.
Glad you came out ok! Ride safe!
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Old 05-10-2013, 11:03 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by shaddix View Post
In a car, if a tire suddenly fails, you're supposed to accelerate hard, but I don't remember why, I also doubt it would be the best thing to do on a bike
Uh what?

You're going 50mph.
Tire goes flat.
You want to change it.
Need to be going 0 mph so you can get out and change it without tearing your arms off and skipping down the road.
Why would you go up to 60 mph before going back through 50 mph to get to 0 mph?
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Old 05-10-2013, 11:19 AM   #26
High Country Herb
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Other than overlooking the flat/low tire, it sounds like you did everything right. On top of that, it sounds like you have excellent balance skills to recover from the slide. Ever consider racing supermotard?

As far as braking, I would not recommend using the front brake with a rear flat. Unloading the rear tire will only make it more likely to come around. Engine braking is helpful, and rim locks would keep the tire from spinning on the rim.

Like you said, had you been coming into a curve at speed, it would have been a priority to slow down. With a flat, I would stand it up and use the front brake, trying to keep the rear in place with steering input if it started to get out of line.

Congrats, you are a good rider.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:01 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by OrangeYZ View Post
Uh what?

You're going 50mph.
Tire goes flat.
You want to change it.
Need to be going 0 mph so you can get out and change it without tearing your arms off and skipping down the road.
Why would you go up to 60 mph before going back through 50 mph to get to 0 mph?
No idea, sounded stupid to me at the time but it was in mythbusters or something on discovery channel...
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Old 05-10-2013, 05:34 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliken View Post
Vet may have let you ride in the "doggie" cage in the back?

Didn't notice earlier that you are a fellow Mainiac! I grew up near Ellsworth.
Vet Body on the back of the truck and it looked like he had a student with him in front- so probably he wouldn't have been much help anyway.
We are about 15 minutes from Newport.

Quote:
Originally Posted by manic mechanic View Post
IMHO, the biggest lesson you learned is that not everything will cause you to crash. Anything can cause a crash, but doesn't necessarily have to. You used what time you had to stay sane and not panic. Commendable. You came out of it none the worse for wear, but perhaps wiser. Don't beat yourself up too badly. Walk away.
Definitely wiser Thanks for the kind words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dismount View Post
I would have copiously shit myself. As it ran down my legs it would have hopefully lowered the cog.
I think I came pretty close
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Old 05-10-2013, 05:41 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaddix View Post
In a car, if a tire suddenly fails, you're supposed to accelerate hard, but I don't remember why, I also doubt it would be the best thing to do on a bike


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawk62cj5 View Post
You stayed upright so you did the right thing in my book . We all forget to look at our tires every now and then so dont beat your self up about , just remember to look at them more often
Definitely will be checking them every time from now on!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbo Ghost View Post
Obviously, everything worked out fine so, congratulations! The one thing I gather from your post that might have made the experience less harrowing would have been to pull the clutch in as soon as the blowout occurred. When the blowout occurred, the wheel was being driven and then, when you rolled of the throttle (the correct thing to do) it was being dragged or at least it became a negative force slowing you down. If you had pulled the clutch in immediately, the rear tire would have been allowed to free-wheel and you could have used the front brakes more aggressively with less chance of the rear coming around. Had the tube wrapped around and locked-up the rear wheel, the clutch wouldn't have made any difference. It's always a good idea to disengage the clutch anytime there is a rear-wheel problem.
I had an instance where an engine siezed on me and locked the rear up at about 50mph. I instantly pulled the clutch and the rear-wheel released and I was able to stop normally and pull off the road.
Glad you came out ok! Ride safe!
By the time I came to a stop the tube was wrapped around the rear tire. Thinking back I think I did pull in the clutch when I rolled off the throttle because that is what I usually do. Basically had to ride it until it got to the bottom of the hill and started to slow. My sense the whole time is that if I touched breaks it was not going to end well, but on the other hand that was m feeling until I finally came to a full stop.
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Old 05-10-2013, 05:46 PM   #30
LisaS OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High Country Herb View Post
Other than overlooking the flat/low tire, it sounds like you did everything right. On top of that, it sounds like you have excellent balance skills to recover from the slide. Ever consider racing supermotard?

As far as braking, I would not recommend using the front brake with a rear flat. Unloading the rear tire will only make it more likely to come around. Engine braking is helpful, and rim locks would keep the tire from spinning on the rim.

Like you said, had you been coming into a curve at speed, it would have been a priority to slow down. With a flat, I would stand it up and use the front brake, trying to keep the rear in place with steering input if it started to get out of line.

Congrats, you are a good rider.
Thanks!

My husbands advice is the same as I am getting here to stop beating my head against the wall- so therefore I am going to take it as a learning experience (that I wish never to repeat) and move foreward.
I think the bit of dirt riding that I do did help in this situation- so definitely need to spend more time this summer working on my dirt skills and getting more comfortable with the back end sliding.
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