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Old 05-10-2013, 12:16 PM   #46
Randy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom-Nor View Post
Get ABS and dont buy a bike with out it again ;)

.
Well, I wouldn't go quite THAT FAR!

But yeah, I agree with the rest of what you said. And I'm one of those old school guys that sometimes frowns on new tech stuff "intruding" into "my" hobby. Not real keen on a lot of the new BMW stuff for example, and still appreciate a simple aircooled, carbureted engine, although I am warming up to FI for some applications now.
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Old 05-10-2013, 12:19 PM   #47
Tom-Nor
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:40 PM   #48
fallingoff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I do have to disagree with the ABS. As a new rider, you should learn how to brake properly on your own, rather than let a computer do it for you. Also a lot of people seem to have the idea that ABS is foolproof, and it isn't.

Many new riders are not learning all kinds of things that a rider should know (how many riders out there probably cannot kick start a bike) not only concerning riding, but maintaining their bike as well. I suspect that is why manufacturers quit putting centerstands on newer bikes with tube type tires (though I don't know why tube type tires are still around anyway) The save a few dollars, and figure many younger riders couldn't fix a flat tire anyway. If you do get a bike with tube type tires and no centerstand, even if you know how, you will not be able to fix a flat out on the side of the road. So aside from all the gear, you will also need a cell phone and a GOOD road service plan.
mate would you buy a car without abs

a learner makes mistakes

abs will save his/her life

if you need to learn break lockup

do it on the dirt

oh get a steam engine

its proven tech,

lol

oh cable brakes are great too

oh lets do a fred

just use ur feet

really grow up

cross ply tyres are great too

lol
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:42 PM   #49
fallingoff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingoff View Post
mate would you buy a car without abs

a learner makes mistakes

abs will save his/her life

if you need to learn break lockup

do it on the dirt

oh get a steam engine

its proven tech,

lol

oh cable brakes are great too

oh lets do a fred

just use ur feet

really grow up

cross ply tyres are great too

lol

great a abs thread

lol

back to good advice pls
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Old 05-10-2013, 05:12 PM   #50
Meter Man
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This thread may inspire you or give you some ideas:

Minimalist touring thread:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=201349
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:29 PM   #51
tshelver
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Some years back I was commuting 320 miles a day, with a choice between an '04 Ninja 250 and a (modified for comfort/touring) ZX12R.
The fastest I ever did the commute was on the 250, no need to fill up on the trip down, easily able to run in the 80s to keep with the traffic.
The 250 ended up being my primary commuting ride.

The negatives that some mention of having to shift to keep it in the powerband I see as a huge positive, as you are learning to ride the bike properly.
The ninja is more of a standard than a sport bike in seating position, again a positive versus a cruiser as you can use your legs and weight shifts to control the bike.

IMHO, most Americans never learn to ride properly, relying on big motors to catch up on the straights, and mostly buying cruisers that lock you into the feet forward riding position.

In the year I rode the 250, I was never passed on the backroads, partly because most of the riders around here are into the pirate lifestyle, but mostly because you really can't run much over 70, handling is far more important.

Having said that, for a new rider a used dual-sport in the 250 to light 650 range is a very good choice. Crashable, and you can go anywhere.
I'd stay from the taller or heavier bikes like the KLR650 or Honda XR650.

As many have said, the middleweight standards are also a good choice, especially if you will be mostly riding on the pavement.
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Old 05-10-2013, 08:32 PM   #52
SnappNBrrap
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id get something that you would be proud to own, even if it is a little beat up. preferably something with fairings. also the first bike should be ≤600cc
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Old 05-10-2013, 11:03 PM   #53
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Wow, lots of great info guys! I'll definitely look into the DR650, although the TU250X sounds like an awesome bike. Not sure if I'll pass on the maxim.

As far as inspiration goes,I think that, to me, I get most excited by watching the top gear Vietnam special, where they ride from one end of the country to the other.


I guess now I just need to decide if I want a duel sport or a standard.... ok,I want both,I guess I just need to decide which one to buy first
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Old 05-11-2013, 09:01 AM   #54
NJ-Brett
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More TU info: some place in the former USSR...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...n/P1020964.jpg

The ST is a carbed version of the TU.
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Old 05-11-2013, 11:17 AM   #55
elementalg20
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Personally, I'd swing for as new of a bike as you can reasonably afford. Old bikes are cool, but if you're not mechanically inclined and don't enjoy doing the maintenance work, it'll just detract from the enjoyment of the experience. I don't mind doing a lot of the work(oil/chains/brakes/suspension etc).....still a carb hater lol but I'll own them just not work on them if there is more than one to tinker with.

I read a lot of this thread, not all but there is great info in all these types of thread typically, salted with bits of enjoyable sarcasm of course

One of the biggest things is to know what you'll be doing with it. Best to learn on back roads and low speeds(some of the most enjoyable riding anyhow). But if you need to do a lot of slab work a nighthawk 250 or similar just isn't going to be as enjoyable as something a bit more powerful. The dual sports can make great learner bikes, drop friendly typically axe simple and reliable. They don't typically make the smoothest highway machines with there big singles, do the research and make sure you pick one that'll be smooth enough for you. I had a 640 adv and it definitely had vibes, but other than a bit in the feet it didn't bother me at 100 miles a stretch.

The TU250x would make a great learner bike, it's modern, retro cool, inexpensive to own and operate. Reasonably drop friendly if it does happen. Certainly not over powered, but those who own them seem content with the power and level of refinement.

Many suggest KLR650's or DR650 for new riders, personally I think they are too tall and intimidating for a new rider. They intimidate me tossing a leg over them, but I'm 5'10". I can certainly ride one, but it adds a degree of difficulty and uncertainty I wouldn't want to deal with as a new rider.

Something like an XT250/CRF250L would be easier if you want a dual sport, haven't been around much else to give a first hand opinion.

The new Honda 500's would work well, nc700x too, SV650 can work, but it's on the high power end of what I generally think a new rider should work with. It's tractable easy to use power making it a little less scary than the 600cc supersports, some of those operate like a light switch by comparison.

As with anything, common sense, being aware of your surroundings, and getting familiar with the machine will help as much as picking the right bike for not only learning on but for what you'll be using it for.
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Old 05-11-2013, 12:57 PM   #56
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Stock, the dr650 suspension sags quite a bit, and they also have factory lowering kits.
I had one with upgraded suspension, not lowered, and stiff enough to go fast in the rough stuff.
If I got another one, I would lower it and keep it soft.
That might keep me out of the hospital...
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Old 05-11-2013, 03:12 PM   #57
Randy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
Stock, the dr650 suspension sags quite a bit, and they also have factory lowering kits.
I had one with upgraded suspension, not lowered, and stiff enough to go fast in the rough stuff.
If I got another one, I would lower it and keep it soft.
That might keep me out of the hospital...
I've actually only ever sat on one DR650. It was at the Cycleworld Int. M/C show in Atlanta, when they still had it in Atlanta and before the yahoos moved it to Greenville, SC of all places! .... but, I digress...

I was surprised to find that it fit me perfectly. I could quite comfortably get at least the balls of both feet on the ground, and I only have a 30" inseam. IDK, maybe it had been lowered as a display bike for the show, but if it was it didn't look too extreme and IMO would have made a great street/gravel road runner. Of course, then again, this is coming from a short ass that also rides a stock height KTM LC4. So maybe my perception of "low enough" is slightly skewed. I still think one like it, set up with a few farkles would make an EXCELLENT first bike. Plenty of power, good D/S riding position for good control, dropable without damage with just a few add-ons, and lots of flexibility. Just take a look at the HUGE DR650 thread over in the Thumpers forum to see just how much fun can be had on one.

I still want one, and maybe one day I'll actually pick one up for myself. As it is now though, I just want TOO many things...


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Old 05-11-2013, 06:30 PM   #58
NJ-Brett
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I REALLY liked my dr650.
I got it for $1500.00 with 5000 miles on it, with an upgraded shock and forks.
I put a pumper carb on it, opened up the air box, and the bike was a hoot!
All that lofting of the front wheel with the throttle would get me in trouble on the street.
For dirt roads and easy trails its great, in the rough stuff, not so much, but if I was younger and my bones were still strong, I could do anything on that bike.
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Old 05-11-2013, 10:05 PM   #59
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I'm between a rock and a hard place: The more I read about the DR650, the more I like it. I want to love it, but... I'm not a huge fan of the Aesthetics. That TU250X just looks gorgeous to me...

Are there any pro's or cons between the two that aren't readily apparent that I should be aware?

Any reason why you guys would get one over the other?
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Old 05-11-2013, 11:53 PM   #60
scooterspirit
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dr650, redunkulas, that's a suck ass first bike. It's a good bike if you spent your whole life on dirt bikes, sure.

250 is a class of motorcycles that is going to build in you the fundamentals, it's an important and needed step, moving to a 650 is a progression, you'll know when your ready.
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