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Old 09-01-2010, 07:40 AM   #1
ElBerto OP
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Tools and parts to pack for a long trip on a Honda nx4

Hi people,

I'm going to buy a Honda Falcon (also called nx4) in Brazil for a four month trip. I plan to do around 15000 km around the continent and to have a good amount of mechanical trouble. This trip is for fun, but also for learning.

What tools and parts should I pack for such a trip?

I'll get something like a 15 year old one with a good 40k on it, so I've though that the first thing I'll change the battery and the drive chain, to clear of potential trouble. Then I'll get a set of spare levers and cables (gear, clutch, front and rear brakes). Tire repair kit, spark plugs, replacement lightbulbs too.

What else should I get? A spare carb? A spare dinamo? Cam chain? Sprockets? I'd say that getting a piston or a fork replacement is going too far, this is hardly Jupiter's travels anymore. Any advice is appreciated, though.
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Old 09-01-2010, 10:42 AM   #2
MMcnamara
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I see you can rent them in Mexico, so they must be tough enough. Remember, loaded down any bike will go through tires and brakes faster.

I'd take an 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, and 14mm sockets and a driver, crescent wrenches covering those sizes, tire irons, standard and #2 phillips screwdrivers. For allen wrenches a bicycle multitool works nicely.

Just look over the bike and see what size fasteners are there.
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Old 09-03-2010, 04:05 AM   #3
ElBerto OP
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I'll take a grip wrench and a hammer too, the tools I tend to use with unexpected problems...
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Old 09-03-2010, 10:34 AM   #4
JSracecars
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I would spend a day working on the bike.

Take it apart as far as you think you will need to and put the tools you used in a pile .

And of those tools i would try to find which ones you really don't need.

Have fun
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:01 AM   #5
LukasM
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Decent little bike... while it runs! I'd bring a spare engine if I were you.





I rode around a rental for a month or so last summer, here it is in Rio shortly before blowing up in the middle of the damn Niteroi bridge, at 2 in the morning no less:





Didn't really have any trouble before that, even though it was an old bike. Not the smartest thing to do, but I ran it very hard because I was in a hurry. Full throttle for hours/days, then at some point the engine probably overheated and seized. If you go slow and check the oil often enough you should be ok.

Good thing is you can find spare parts in any decent sized town. I would just bring a patch kit, a cable repair kit, a set of spare tubes and levers (brakes, clutch, shifter), and some very basic hand tools. If you have the oil changed at a Honda dealership they won't even charge any labor, just materials which are cheap. Lovely people those Brazilians!






If you need an awesome mechanic in Rio let me know.
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:24 AM   #6
Gerd
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Chain tensioner!

I'm planning to buy this same model, I've never ridden one but after researching I found that the main weak spot is the cam chain tensioner...

The spring looses tension after around 20.000-30.000 km., so you should check that and probably buy a new part from Honda.

It is also said that certain model years suffered from a bad clutch, that started slipping after a few thousand km. Check that too... Otherwise it is a great bike, with good torque.

Gerd
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Old 09-08-2010, 09:57 AM   #7
ElBerto OP
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@JSracecars - Yeah, I'll spend a couple of days taking things apart and tuning up the bike, no real hurry to get on the road, Rio will be nice.

@Gerd - Great advice, I plan to ride slowly and enjoy the scenery. I'll make sure the bike doesn't heat too much and has clean oil, I heard this one doesn't bring an oil temperature indicator, so that could be vital. BTW, that mechanic address in Rio would be very useful, could you please share it?

@LukasM - Cam chain tensioner and slipping clutch. The first one is scarier, but that's the kind of things I want to be aware of, may thanks!
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Old 05-18-2013, 08:11 PM   #8
2fortheroad.co.uk
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i wish...

with a failure at 30000km I would be overjoyed. mine fails like clockwork at 5000km. it's the bane of my motorbike trip.

ok, i'm riding this bike 2-up and at the max specified payload as stated in the manual, but still I am unable to fathom this. every 5000km? please!

Interesting is: within south america most honda reps don't stock the honda specified model for the NX4 14520-MCG-771.
however they all offer the alternative models for the Tornado 250, which they all say is "exactly the same", they all begin with 14520-KPF-xxx or 14520-KCY-xxx.
The honda internal parts computer system recommends these as possible alternatives as well.

I suspect that this could be the issue, i.e. these alternatives are just not up to the job. but then they look identical and to be honest I have no way of verifying this. as I say, all Honda folks say that they ARE identical.

anyone with magical insights, I would LOVE to hear them.

PS: is it REALLY necessary to crank the engine cycle to the T-mark in the timing hole cover when changing this part??? as I recall most honda mechanics didn't bother and personally I cannot see how it would make a difference. In the service manual it states all the steps for replacing the tensioner and THEREAFTER, it lists a paragraph saying "be sure to set the crank to the T-mark..."

(ps: if you interested in my ride experiences on this model my page [facebook and web] is 2fotheroad.co.uk)
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Old 05-18-2013, 08:45 PM   #9
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Old 05-19-2013, 06:34 AM   #10
XDragRacer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2fortheroad.co.uk View Post
PS: is it REALLY necessary to crank the engine cycle to the T-mark in the timing hole cover when changing this part??? as I recall most honda mechanics didn't bother and personally I cannot see how it would make a difference. In the service manual it states all the steps for replacing the tensioner and THEREAFTER, it lists a paragraph saying "be sure to set the crank to the T-mark..."
Setting the engine at the "T-mark" between compression and power strokes is a point with ALL valves completely CLOSED; thus . . . minimum valve-spring and cam-lobe stress on the cam chain. Therefore, not a bad point in the engine cycle to replace the cam chain tensioner, IMHO.

"Necessary?" Maybe not, but . . . it isn't nice to fool Mother Honda!
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