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Old 05-13-2013, 12:31 PM   #16
Smoke Eater 3
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I've never had a problem lifting a dropped bike with just my legs but I can see where some people might. Now that I think about it, you could enhance the leg lift technique with a piece of webbing or a ratchet strap around your neck and attached to the bike at 2 points. Now you have 4 points of lifting.

Obviously, the best thing to do is to get help.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:01 PM   #17
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Small lightweight and easily packed in your toolkit -- http://www.pugetsoundsafety.com/main...#cat=23&pid=73

http://www.bestrestproducts.com/c-16...-gear-mrs.aspx
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Old 05-13-2013, 02:25 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by S/W View Post
The young lady in this video shows how it is done without the pulleys. This method works.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6HTs9x3xBE
Damn, She did a good job lifting although she rested few times before heaving the pig up. Good idea on the kickstand already being deployed which allowed her to simply push up and done.

I also saw an exhibit during Daytona Bike Week in which ladies, although that maybe pushing the term slightly. Let's say healthy ladies picked up a full dresser Harley but not really valid as the saddle bags kept the bike upright enough that they were able to squeeze under slightly and lift. Can't be done if no saddlebags. YouTube is filled with similar demo.

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Old 05-13-2013, 04:58 PM   #19
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that is nice, although the rope seems a bit small (6mm)

about prussiks, honestly the pre tied ones are quite annoying and always too long. learn to make a good bend (zeppeling or sheet bend), which allows you to shorten the prussik to an efficient exact length so there isnt any slack when zdragging. I bought pre tied ones just for having the right type of rope (special grip, core and diameter) but I cut the knot away on purpose.
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Old 05-13-2013, 05:44 PM   #20
flei
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game hoist

why not use a game hoist (minus the gambrel)? you can get one at wally-world for less than $20..... add a rachet strap if you need xtra pull....
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:53 PM   #21
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:48 PM   #22
flei
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why not use a game hoist (minus the gambrel)? you can get one at wally-world for less than $20..... add a rachet strap if you need xtra pull....
By the way, if you add a couple of prusik hitches, this is called a "z-drag" set-up in the rescue world. NRS, PSSOR and others sell heavy duty "rescue ready" versions of this online for big $$$$ (e.g., $179)! If you are hauling a bike, not a person, it's not a matter of life or death so I think the $20 game hoist might suffice!
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:54 PM   #23
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There's also the matter of leverage when choosing a system. z-drag is 3:1 where pulleys can give you more if needed.
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Old 05-15-2013, 08:05 PM   #24
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ratchit strap... jiggly jiggle jiggle...
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Old 05-16-2013, 12:10 AM   #25
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I can pick up my GSA about 9 out of 10 times. For some reason, footing, gas in the tank, or altitude, a few times I've had trouble. I bought a light weight snow mobile high lift jack that packs down small and weighs about six lbs. I keep it in my top box. Since I bought it a few years back I have not needed it, but one never knows when it will come in handy.
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Old 05-16-2013, 06:52 AM   #26
flei
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Originally Posted by GarrettRB View Post
There's also the matter of leverage when choosing a system. z-drag is 3:1 where pulleys can give you more if needed.

It's possible to rig a 6:1 (or more) Z-drag:

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread734949/pg1
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Old 05-16-2013, 07:53 AM   #27
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I love how so many people dismiss this type of idea and say to get a smaller bike or learn to lift. While these are both valid suggestions, so is carrying a self-recovery kit. I don't understand the mindset of ridiculing this type of idea. If you don't think you'll use it, than move on.

I may consider something like this for my dualsport. I was actually out trail riding over the weekend by myself and broke my leg. I could just barely lift up my KLR250 with my injury. If it were any bigger of a bike, I don't think I could have done it. I'm a fairly big guy and lift weights regularly, so picking up a bike, even larger street bikes has never been overly difficult for me. However, with an injury that all changes. Lifting up that sub-300lb bike took every last ounce of strength and willpower I had. Absolutely no way I would have been able to pick up a full size bike like that.
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:29 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by max384 View Post
I love how so many people dismiss this type of idea and say to get a smaller bike or learn to lift. While these are both valid suggestions, so is carrying a self-recovery kit. I don't understand the mindset of ridiculing this type of idea. If you don't think you'll use it, than move on.
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Old 05-18-2013, 12:50 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by max384 View Post
I love how so many people dismiss this type of idea and say to get a smaller bike or learn to lift. While these are both valid suggestions, so is carrying a self-recovery kit. I don't understand the mindset of ridiculing this type of idea. If you don't think you'll use it, than move on.
It is a mindset issue. First you bring a self-recovery kit, add an electric air pump, full-sized tire irons, front and rear UHD tubes, vice-grip pliers, spares of every part that could conceivingly break, and the list of the things that might come in handy goes on and on. It is one sure way to guarentee that you will need the self-recovery kit in a tip over.
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Old 05-21-2013, 06:36 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by SocalRob View Post
I can pick up my GSA about 9 out of 10 times. For some reason, footing, gas in the tank, or altitude, a few times I've had trouble. I bought a light weight snow mobile high lift jack that packs down small and weighs about six lbs. I keep it in my top box. Since I bought it a few years back I have not needed it, but one never knows when it will come in handy.
Which jack is it? How do you hook it to the bike when lifting it?
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