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Old 08-01-2014, 05:38 AM   #1
Oaktree OP
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Seriously considering a new KTM 1190 Adv R... Questions...?

Inmates... indeed. My sanity has been rightfully questioned.

I posted this to the KTMForums also. I'm really looking for some feedback here. The bug has bitten, but I haven't made the move yet. For me, a bike purchase is a long term relationship. Any thoughts here?

I've been riding my 2000 BMW R1100R year round for 14 years. It's time to buy my next new bike, and I'm torn between the performance of a sport bike, and the utility of a dual sport; but, a sport bike is just not the tool for the job the way I use a motorcycle.

The Moto Guzzi Stelvio has held my interest for the last several months until I seriously started looking at the 1190 Adventure R. What I like about the Stelvio is the rugged simplicity of the machine - it's similar to the engineering BMW used to use... a bike built by engineers for engineers... I always thought that was a compliment, myself.

I'm a little skittish about so much electronics on a bike, but I'm considering KTM may have done the job right.

Here are my questions:

Does anyone do their own maintenance on these? What is required? I've done all my own work on the BMW for the last 100,000 miles. (178k on the clock now)

How does the KTM 1190 Adventure do in the cold? ...and by cold, I really mean the coldest morning / night commute that we will see in Massachusetts. I hit a record low of -6 F on my commute for the first time Winter 2010, and then again in 2012. The BMW NEVER failed to start no matter how cold it was here in NE Massachusetts.

How does the KTM do on ice / snow? For the last seven years, I've put dual sport tires on the R1100R, drilled them out w/ carbide burr, and installed automotive studs. I've always ridden year-round since I started riding street bikes in 1994 in MO. It was easier when I moved to San Diego in 1998. I do what I have to here in MA... and I love every mile of it.

Does the engine heat a few have commented on help in the cold? My feet have NEVER been cold on the R1100R, even in the negative temps. And yet, my feet don't bake in the summer. It's been nice. How does the heat coming off the 1190 Adv do in the cold?

...looking at farkles too: Givi Outback cases, Tourtech upper crash bars, heated grips, heated seat, tank bag, gps, driving lights... does anyone have a recommendation for driving lights? I'm considering LEDs in order to conserve power for heated grips, seat, and jacket.

Convince me I'm on the right path here... my heart is saying "This is the ultimate do-it-all, every-day, commuter, explorer, grinning-ear-to-ear throttle loving machine." My sensible side is saying, "The Guzzi has simpler electronics and can be maintained at home."
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Old 08-01-2014, 07:30 AM   #2
scudrunner82
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Inmates... indeed. My sanity has been rightfully questioned.

I posted this to the KTMForums also. I'm really looking for some feedback here. The bug has bitten, but I haven't made the move yet. For me, a bike purchase is a long term relationship. Any thoughts here?

I've been riding my 2000 BMW R1100R year round for 14 years. It's time to buy my next new bike, and I'm torn between the performance of a sport bike, and the utility of a dual sport; but, a sport bike is just not the tool for the job the way I use a motorcycle.

The Moto Guzzi Stelvio has held my interest for the last several months until I seriously started looking at the 1190 Adventure R. What I like about the Stelvio is the rugged simplicity of the machine - it's similar to the engineering BMW used to use... a bike built by engineers for engineers... I always thought that was a compliment, myself.

I'm a little skittish about so much electronics on a bike, but I'm considering KTM may have done the job right.

Here are my questions:

Does anyone do their own maintenance on these? Most people do What is required? Nothing more than most other bikes, a plus is they are extremely easy to work on. Just install a Unifilter if you buy one.I've done all my own work on the BMW for the last 100,000 miles. (178k on the clock now)



How does the KTM 1190 Adventure do in the cold? I've ridden into the low 20s and the bike ran and started fine. I don't have much interest in riding much colder than that though. ...and by cold, I really mean the coldest morning / night commute that we will see in Massachusetts. I hit a record low of -6 F on my commute for the first time Winter 2010, and then again in 2012. The BMW NEVER failed to start no matter how cold it was here in NE Massachusetts.

How does the KTM do on ice / snow? Havent ridden snow yet, but judging how confidence inspiring it is on any other surface I imagine it will be stellar on snow/iceFor the last seven years, I've put dual sport tires on the R1100R, drilled them out w/ carbide burr, and installed automotive studs. I've always ridden year-round since I started riding street bikes in 1994 in MO. It was easier when I moved to San Diego in 1998. I do what I have to here in MA... and I love every mile of it.

Does the engine heat a few have commented on help in the cold? I guess you could say it helps, but I wouldn't rely on it. I'm one of those that don't find the engine heat excessive. My feet have NEVER been cold on the R1100R, even in the negative temps. And yet, my feet don't bake in the summer. It's been nice. How does the heat coming off the 1190 Adv do in the cold?

...looking at farkles too: Givi Outback cases, Tourtech upper crash bars, heated grips, heated seat, tank bag, gps, driving lights... does anyone have a recommendation for driving lights? I'm considering LEDs in order to conserve power for heated grips, seat, and jacket.

Convince me I'm on the right path here... my heart is saying "This is the ultimate do-it-all, every-day, commuter, explorer, grinning-ear-to-ear throttle loving machine." My sensible side is saying, "The Guzzi has simpler electronics and can be maintained at home." I don't think anybody here will try to convince you to buy it. Just go test ride one and bring your checkbook
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Old 08-01-2014, 09:03 AM   #3
txbear55
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I don't have a 1190 (yet), but a 990 Adv. Prior bike was a '04 1150 GSA.
In a way, you are coming off of a tractor and going to a Porsche. Massively more performance oriented, higher tech, and to me, more maintenance required.

I personally would not enjoy slogging through sub zero snow and ice with such a awesome machine. Then again, program in "off road" and limit your horsepower to "only" 100!

What about keeping the tractor for blizzard days, then 1190 for better weather and using the 150 HP!
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:51 PM   #4
Oaktree OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scudrunner82 View Post
Does anyone do their own maintenance on these? Most people do What is required? Nothing more than most other bikes, a plus is they are extremely easy to work on. Just install a Unifilter if you buy one.I've done all my own work on the BMW for the last 100,000 miles. (178k on the clock now)





How does the KTM do on ice / snow? Havent ridden snow yet, but judging how confidence inspiring it is on any other surface I imagine it will be stellar on snow/iceFor the last seven years, I've put dual sport tires on the R1100R, drilled them out w/ carbide burr, and installed automotive studs. I've always ridden year-round since I started riding street bikes in 1994 in MO. It was easier when I moved to San Diego in 1998. I do what I have to here in MA... and I love every mile of it.


Convince me I'm on the right path here... my heart is saying "This is the ultimate do-it-all, every-day, commuter, explorer, grinning-ear-to-ear throttle loving machine." My sensible side is saying, "The Guzzi has simpler electronics and can be maintained at home." I don't think anybody here will try to convince you to buy it. Just go test ride one and bring your checkbook

For keeping it maintained, I assume it's mostly chain maintenance, valve adjustments, fluids, and carb synchronization - but do you need to sync the carbs? How does the typical garage mechanic access the engine diagnostics? Are there any adjustments that need to be made through the computer diagnostics? Those are the things that I really wonder about regarding keeping her tip top in my garage.

I've ridden one. The dealer and I are talking, but nothing is signed yet.

I also think that as well as it handles on rough and uncertain terrain that it should do absolutely stellar in the snow. Plus, it will be a lot easier to find appropriate shoes that fit. It took several years and trial and error to find the right off-size studdable shoe to fit the R1100R.

Unfortunately, I think I will be letting the Bimmer go. ...it's a two-horse stable: mine, and my wife's Triumph.
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Old 08-02-2014, 03:31 PM   #5
RobZorba
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@Oaktree@

I test rode two Moto Guzzis - both the Stelvio and the new California. Totally unacceptable level of engine vibrations coupled to the bars. The bars shook so badly at > 60 kph that the mirrors were a blur. After a 100 km journey, my arms and hands went numb fingers went white - all caused by the vibration. After stopping the 'bike(s) it took more than 15 minutes to get feeling back. With the level of vibration I experienced, it could lead to permanent hand/arm nerve damage.

By contrast, I've ridden my 1190 (with Ergo Seats) on several 300 km journeys without a break. It's an extremely comfortable and enjoyable ride with no fatigue caused to the rider. I have a broken back - yet the 1190 is actually helping my full recovery from surgery. This is due to the comfortable and upright riding position, great suspension, and "I wannabe out there" factor that gets me exploring new places on my 1190 every chance I get.
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Old 08-02-2014, 05:04 PM   #6
Oaktree OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobZorba View Post
@Oaktree@

I test rode two Moto Guzzis - both the Stelvio and the new California. Totally unacceptable level of engine vibrations coupled to the bars. The bars shook so badly at > 60 kph that the mirrors were a blur. After a 100 km journey, my arms and hands went numb fingers went white - all caused by the vibration. After stopping the 'bike(s) it took more than 15 minutes to get feeling back. With the level of vibration I experienced, it could lead to permanent hand/arm nerve damage.

By contrast, I've ridden my 1190 (with Ergo Seats) on several 300 km journeys without a break. It's an extremely comfortable and enjoyable ride with no fatigue caused to the rider. I have a broken back - yet the 1190 is actually helping my full recovery from surgery. This is due to the comfortable and upright riding position, great suspension, and "I wannabe out there" factor that gets me exploring new places on my 1190 every chance I get.
Well - careful there about judging the vibration of the Guzzi. When I had the dealer servicing my BMW, I noticed that it vibrated differently depending on who did the service. When I started adjusting the valves and balancing the carbs myself, I found that the big twins are VERY sensitive to good tuning. If you take your TIME to get not just the valve clearance, but the DRAG on the feeler gauges the same on every tappet it makes a huge difference. The carbs sync better too - they stay in balance throughout the RPM range. I can make my boxer smooth as silk if I really take my time.

My knee-jerk guess is that someone didn't set those bikes up right, but just slopped them together.

But, I'm still leaning now toward the 1190R. I'm hungry for the performance. I'm still skittish about being able to keep her tuned w/ all the computerized wizardry. Don't get me wrong, I am a technical guy (16 years in high voltage power conversion, electrical engineer. Currently the engineering manager of our design division). But, I'm a hardware guy, not a software guy.

The Guzzi has a lot of soul. But, I think the KTM would really move me.
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Old 08-03-2014, 08:02 AM   #7
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Interesting comments about hand numbness and the big twins. I had a GSA for 5 years, and the last year I had numbness in my right hand that would last up to a week after a long ride. Thought it was just aging. I haven't had that problem since switching to the 1190. Hadn't thought about this until your post Rob Zorba. Maybe my bike wasn't tuned right, but I did have this when on a tour with a 1200 GS as well?
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Old 08-03-2014, 12:44 PM   #8
Oaktree OP
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Another contributing factor is the engine orientation. I think the engine vibration is more readily transferred to the handlebars with the longitudinal shaft orientation of the boxer and the Guzzi V. Engine pulsations are in the sideways direction. This is what's behind the sideways reaction torque experienced while revving a longitudinal shaft engine - which draws a lot of criticism from folks who aren't used to it.

With a transverse shaft, as on the 1190, the engine pulsations are transferred in the longitudinal direction and absorbed by the chassis and suspension.

I guess the bottom line is that increased handlebar vibration is as much a function of the fundamental design of the bike as it is to tuning. From my own experience, though, careful tuning has a lot to do with amount of vibration I feel on my Bimmer. I also have the Throttlemeister bar ends, which adds mass to the bars and absorbs some of the vibration energy.

Tomorrow I'll sit down w/ the dealer and discuss options, incentives, and numbers on a new 1190R. Vroom.
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Old 08-04-2014, 04:11 PM   #9
wsmc99
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If you want a simple machine then why not a 950 Adventure?
Don't want to mess with the carbs = 990 Adventure.
What it to ride itself = 1190 Adventure.

I've owned a LOT of bikes.

950 Adventure and current 990 SMT.
Have ridden the 1190 too.

They all have a different feel. Ride all of them and pick the one that suits your taste. They are all terribly capable bikes and the maintenance is fairly straight forward. Not quite as simple/accessible as the GS, but not hard.
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Old 08-04-2014, 04:36 PM   #10
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Hey Oaktree

I live where there is NO snow : ( so I would be little help, If you do Instagram there is a guy sammergreeneggsandham lives in Vancouver BC, he would be a good one to ask, his 1190R has a chainsaw rack even! I don't know if he is on ADVrider though. I would say go for it just get some big knobbies, I'm loving my bike.
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