ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Regional forums > Australia
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-03-2013, 06:51 AM   #31
KASUYAHO
Road Hog
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Aussie Land
Oddometer: 3,452
Xr680rn




1991 XR680RN Baja Monster
Since the first officially sanctioned Baja 1000 in 1967, Honda motorcycles have come to dominate this world-renown event with 16 consecutive motorcycle wins including the most recent victory in 2012, good for 23 total wins. In the 1990s, though, big-bore two-strokes ruled the day, and Honda met the challenge as it does with most: experimentation, to find new ideas for future four-stroke off-road bikes. The monstrously huge XR680RN you see here is the result of one of those fantastically creative experiments.

The late Bruce Ogilvie—long-time team coordinator for Honda’s Off-Road Team, two-time winner of the Baja 1000 and five-time victor in the Baja 500—explained a few years ago how this bike came into existence. “In 1991 we developed the bike nicknamed The Monster. We were looking for a way to gain a horsepower edge over the big two-strokes, so we took an XR600R and bored and stroked the engine to 680cc and put in a hotter cam. Boy, that thing ran hard! You really had to recalibrate your brain and change your riding style, because you would hit things so fast, so much sooner than you were used to.

“It was faster than all the two-strokes of the time, but we had pumped it up so much we were grossly exceeding the design limits of the entire bike. Durability became an issue. The 680 made so much horsepower it would just crack the center cases horizontally. Then we started exploding rear wheels, bending swingarms, stuff like that. It sure was fun to ride, though. It was incredibly fast. The Monster never finished a race, but we learned a lot.”
KASUYAHO is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 06:58 AM   #32
KASUYAHO
Road Hog
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: Aussie Land
Oddometer: 3,452
1X Kawasaki KX500 of the day

KASUYAHO is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 07:10 AM   #33
TopDogDave
Manly, NSW, Australia
 
TopDogDave's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Singapore expat from Syderney
Oddometer: 152
local talent

locaql talent
__________________
'90 R100GS PD - large
'94 XR600R - medium
'73 BSA B50MX - small
TopDogDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 07:15 AM   #34
TopDogDave
Manly, NSW, Australia
 
TopDogDave's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Singapore expat from Syderney
Oddometer: 152
no talent

me...no talent!
__________________
'90 R100GS PD - large
'94 XR600R - medium
'73 BSA B50MX - small
TopDogDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 07:27 AM   #35
Kenno OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Kenno's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: CAIRNS - AUSTRALIA
Oddometer: 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by KASUYAHO View Post



1991 XR680RN Baja Monster
Since the first officially sanctioned Baja 1000 in 1967, Honda motorcycles have come to dominate this world-renown event with 16 consecutive motorcycle wins including the most recent victory in 2012, good for 23 total wins. In the 1990s, though, big-bore two-strokes ruled the day, and Honda met the challenge as it does with most: experimentation, to find new ideas for future four-stroke off-road bikes. The monstrously huge XR680RN you see here is the result of one of those fantastically creative experiments.

The late Bruce Ogilvie—long-time team coordinator for Honda’s Off-Road Team, two-time winner of the Baja 1000 and five-time victor in the Baja 500—explained a few years ago how this bike came into existence. “In 1991 we developed the bike nicknamed The Monster. We were looking for a way to gain a horsepower edge over the big two-strokes, so we took an XR600R and bored and stroked the engine to 680cc and put in a hotter cam. Boy, that thing ran hard! You really had to recalibrate your brain and change your riding style, because you would hit things so fast, so much sooner than you were used to.

“It was faster than all the two-strokes of the time, but we had pumped it up so much we were grossly exceeding the design limits of the entire bike. Durability became an issue. The 680 made so much horsepower it would just crack the center cases horizontally. Then we started exploding rear wheels, bending swingarms, stuff like that. It sure was fun to ride, though. It was incredibly fast. The Monster never finished a race, but we learned a lot.”
Holy shit!! At least we know the cranks were ok, they should have tied fencing wire around the cases before they broke.
Thanks for the pics, never knew it existed.
__________________
Ken

"Parts left out cost nothing and cause no service problems" (Kettering)
Kenno is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 09:30 PM   #36
Captain115
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Captain115's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Brisbane, Straya
Oddometer: 270
Charging stuff from a XR6

Hey guys,

I'll probably ask this same question in the main XR6 thread (Call all XR600s) at some point, but I figured that it might be more relevant with the aussie-spec XR.

Basically, if you want to run anything else on the bike, you've got to do the stator upgrade yes? Because at the moment, if I turn on my indicators it makes the headlight brightens and dims frequency of the blinkers; pretty funny to watch.

But yeah to run a GPS, charge phone etc I'd need a more powerful stator right?

My question is: would it be better to wire up a little battery somewhere, so I can charge stuff for a bit when it's the bikes off or if I hook up small extra lights, I can have them on while the big is off (eg setting up a tent in the dark)?
Obviously it doesn't matter if I run the battery down since it's a kickstart.

Or is it easier/better just o run if all off the normal stator power?

I know that Ken's done some touring on the XR (L?) and might chime in, but what about others out there? Or maybe you guys might remember what you did back in the day, when you were riding them new!

Side note: I have verrrry little funds, so keep it simple and cheap.

Cheers,

John
Captain115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 10:05 PM   #37
Kenno OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Kenno's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: CAIRNS - AUSTRALIA
Oddometer: 624
XR600 12VDC power

Hi John, I can help you with that, save your dollars because the stock system can handle it, my XR600 runs a small battery just fine (thousands of K's) and I use it in the way you want to.

You just need to tap into the green and black wires at your regulator/rectifier behind the headlight.

I fitted a diode and small battery behind the speedo and wired a cig socket into it for permanent 12vdc when the engine is off, diode stops any chance of the battery wasting via the rectifier should there be a fault at any time (unlikely).

My GPS is wired direct to the green and black wires so when the engine stops I get an alert on the gps that it has lost power and it then doesn't flatten the 12v or gps batteries, don't use the cig socket for the gps, it will drive you nuts switching off and on all the time because of the terminals vibrating and affecting connection in the socket.

It works really well and is the reason a few folks have not sold their XR600's around Australia. They are a good adventure bike too, just take it easy or gear it up for long runs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain115 View Post
Hey guys,

I'll probably ask this same question in the main XR6 thread (Call all XR600s) at some point, but I figured that it might be more relevant with the aussie-spec XR.

Basically, if you want to run anything else on the bike, you've got to do the stator upgrade yes? Because at the moment, if I turn on my indicators it makes the headlight brightens and dims frequency of the blinkers; pretty funny to watch.

But yeah to run a GPS, charge phone etc I'd need a more powerful stator right?

My question is: would it be better to wire up a little battery somewhere, so I can charge stuff for a bit when it's the bikes off or if I hook up small extra lights, I can have them on while the big is off (eg setting up a tent in the dark)?
Obviously it doesn't matter if I run the battery down since it's a kickstart.

Or is it easier/better just o run if all off the normal stator power?

I know that Ken's done some touring on the XR (L?) and might chime in, but what about others out there? Or maybe you guys might remember what you did back in the day, when you were riding them new!

Side note: I have verrrry little funds, so keep it simple and cheap.

Cheers,

John
Agricultural installation for Cape trip, I'll get around to something neater one day but it works fine.
__________________
Ken

"Parts left out cost nothing and cause no service problems" (Kettering)

Kenno screwed with this post 06-06-2013 at 10:23 PM
Kenno is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 11:56 PM   #38
Captain115
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Captain115's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Brisbane, Straya
Oddometer: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenno View Post
Hi John, I can help you with that, save your dollars because the stock system can handle it, my XR600 runs a small battery just fine (thousands of K's) and I use it in the way you want to.

You just need to tap into the green and black wires at your regulator/rectifier behind the headlight.

I fitted a diode and small battery behind the speedo and wired a cig socket into it for permanent 12vdc when the engine is off, diode stops any chance of the battery wasting via the rectifier should there be a fault at any time (unlikely).

My GPS is wired direct to the green and black wires so when the engine stops I get an alert on the gps that it has lost power and it then doesn't flatten the 12v or gps batteries, don't use the cig socket for the gps, it will drive you nuts switching off and on all the time because of the terminals vibrating and affecting connection in the socket.

It works really well and is the reason a few folks have not sold their XR600's around Australia. They are a good adventure bike too, just take it easy or gear it up for long runs.

]
Perfect response Ken, that's exactly what I was looking for!

I'm pretty shit with electronics (I think I've got my sparky or elec engineer friends to explain the difference between current, voltage and Watts about 20 times but still don't know what they're on about) but this does sound like something I could do...or give one of my mates a 6-pack to do!

So I'd need some wire, tape or heatshrink and a battery, and a 12 outlet yeah? That photo helps heaps by the way, great that I can see how you put everything together.

Just to double check, what kind of 12v battery should I be looking for, or would you suggest? Something to get from battery world for example?

Thanks,

John
Captain115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2013, 01:50 AM   #39
Kenno OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Kenno's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: CAIRNS - AUSTRALIA
Oddometer: 624
XR600 12v DC

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain115 View Post
Perfect response Ken, that's exactly what I was looking for!

I'm pretty shit with electronics (I think I've got my sparky or elec engineer friends to explain the difference between current, voltage and Watts about 20 times but still don't know what they're on about) but this does sound like something I could do...or give one of my mates a 6-pack to do!

So I'd need some wire, tape or heatshrink and a battery, and a 12 outlet yeah? That photo helps heaps by the way, great that I can see how you put everything together.

Just to double check, what kind of 12v battery should I be looking for, or would you suggest? Something to get from battery world for example?

Thanks,

John
Sometimes it is better to know less because you keep things much simpler, it really matters when you are out there on your own in the scrub.

I used some plastic terminal strip held to the bars with cable ties for the connections, made a little battery cradle from aluminium sheet so the speedo bolt brackets don't damage the battery base then one of these 12v 1.3Amp batteries http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView...UBCATID=997#12
The battery is held in place with cable ties too as is the moisture proof cig lighter from the same place.

The whole thing weighs nothing, is bulletproof and was meant to be a temporary setup but I fell in love with it and left it there.

The whole lot will only cost you about $30.
Best money ever spent on the old girl, totally changed it's character for getting away without having to rely on 240v charging for camera, phone, gps etc, i got one of those multi type battery chargers and plug it into the socket at camp and it charges the weird camera battery to full.






Charging the phone at camp
__________________
Ken

"Parts left out cost nothing and cause no service problems" (Kettering)

Kenno screwed with this post 06-07-2013 at 02:05 AM
Kenno is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2013, 03:59 PM   #40
Captain115
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Captain115's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Brisbane, Straya
Oddometer: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenno View Post
Sometimes it is better to know less because you keep things much simpler, it really matters when you are out there on your own in the scrub.

I used some plastic terminal strip held to the bars with cable ties for the connections, made a little battery cradle from aluminium sheet so the speedo bolt brackets don't damage the battery base then one of these 12v 1.3Amp batteries http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView...UBCATID=997#12
The battery is held in place with cable ties too as is the moisture proof cig lighter from the same place.

The whole thing weighs nothing, is bulletproof and was meant to be a temporary setup but I fell in love with it and left it there.

The whole lot will only cost you about $30.
Best money ever spent on the old girl, totally changed it's character for getting away without having to rely on 240v charging for camera, phone, gps etc, i got one of those multi type battery chargers and plug it into the socket at camp and it charges the weird camera battery to full.
[/IMG]
Perfect, thanks Ken. Exactly what I needed to hear and see!

I'll give it a crack after I get some time to put the old girl back together (using that sweet flywheel holding method you mentioned).

Thanks again, will let you know if I have any troubles.

John
Captain115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 03:18 AM   #41
outback jack
Beastly Adventurer
 
outback jack's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Central outback QLD.
Oddometer: 6,646
Rising sun Honda

Ken, i was at Rising sun Honda last week scoping potential targets. They had 6 brand new L's on the floor with Cocky canvas tank and seat covers/ bash plates/ hand guards/ and tube repair kits. Non ADR. The price was dearer than Longreach $10,500
__________________
There's something ugly about a NEW bike on a trailer.


CCC ride Cattle, Coal & Cane or Captains Crossing & Castlemaine.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...1#post17025601
outback jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 03:28 AM   #42
philth
philth
 
philth's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: bald knob
Oddometer: 5,756
Quote:
Originally Posted by outback jack View Post
Ken, i was at Rising sun Honda last week scoping potential targets. They had 6 brand new L's on the floor with Cocky canvas tank and seat covers/ bash plates/ hand guards/ and tube repair kits. Non ADR. The price was dearer than Longreach $10,500
wouldnt the cockys be happier on 250s?
did they have any ag deals on them?
__________________
i must not post hairy buttocks
philth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 03:35 AM   #43
outback jack
Beastly Adventurer
 
outback jack's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Central outback QLD.
Oddometer: 6,646
Quote:
Originally Posted by philth View Post
wouldnt the cockys be happier on 250s?
did they have any ag deals on them?
All the cockies out this way use DRZ 400's mostly and 650's further west. Some of those cockies rack up big miles in a day, i didn't ask about AG deals but $9500 i'm sure was the Longreach price. The best deal and bike i saw was the new 250L fuel injected/ steel frame/ upside down forks, good enough ground clearance and only $6500 . Muster cows, hit the boot camp and take off for a weekend with some gear.
__________________
There's something ugly about a NEW bike on a trailer.


CCC ride Cattle, Coal & Cane or Captains Crossing & Castlemaine.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...1#post17025601

outback jack screwed with this post 06-18-2013 at 04:07 AM
outback jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 05:38 PM   #44
Kenno OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Kenno's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: CAIRNS - AUSTRALIA
Oddometer: 624
Looking at what folks are asking for 2002 650L's the price doesn't look that bad now.



Ken is mobile.
__________________
Ken

"Parts left out cost nothing and cause no service problems" (Kettering)
Kenno is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 07:07 PM   #45
Captain115
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Captain115's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Brisbane, Straya
Oddometer: 270
Maybe I'm missing something, but why would anyone buy an XR650L today?

I know that they are still sold in the US (why did it stop here?) but for the price that you guys are mentioning, $9k+, you are getting an old model bike that isn't supported in Australia, for at least $1k more than a DR650 would run you. Which obviously has a massive aftermarket support.

It just doesn't seem to make financial sense selling this bike, especially for the prices that were mentioned. Who would buy a new XR650L, especially over these similar bikes? Serious question by the way, would like some discussion, or someone setting me straight.

Cheers,

John
Captain115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014