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Old 06-08-2013, 10:25 AM   #16
4wheeldog
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A gremlin reached up and grabbed your foot. It is more difficult to cause mechanical difficulties in non HD iron, so you need the bell to keep the little bastards from grabbing your tootsies.

Hope you heal well. I broke my ankle once, at the start of a 9 day backpacking trip. Didn't get it diagnosed until 3 weeks after we got back........When I rebroke it. Good luck.
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Old 06-11-2013, 08:24 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumbeen View Post
Hum ok. I thought I remembered reading an article somehwere that said to leave the balls of your feet half off so your toes are actually pointed outwards a little bit
Trust me when i say this. lets say you have your heels on the pegs instead of the balls of your feet. thinking your superman on turns and your riding and riding and riding and doing twisties. but all the sudden your foot gets sucked up and twisted under the peg and bike. because your toes drop below the level of the pegs. and oh shit. now your foot/leg is facing the opposite direction. and if that doesnt rip you off the bike, trying to regain control will. which causes further injury. your just asking for trouble when you do that. so please please please for your own good. its much better for you if your on the balls of your feet and not your heels. plus it helps your balance offroad. and on road when your riding in tight turns at a higher rate of speed.
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Old 06-11-2013, 06:55 PM   #18
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I have big wide feet and a new pair of Alpinestar Scouts I'm trying my best to avoid dragging. Can't seem to find sliders for them.

I'm trying real hard to practice balls on the pegs and toes slightly in and try to not drag my toe at all if I can help it.
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Old 06-13-2013, 09:19 AM   #19
LuciferMutt
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Ride with your balls of your feet on the pegs! I see so many people riding around with their huge clodhoppers hanging out to the sides of the pegs...very dangerous, as you found out the hard way! Sorry to hear of your injuries.
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Old 06-13-2013, 07:47 PM   #20
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Learn body position & foot placement. Track schools, like CSS would be a great help. No need to drag hard parts if you're doing it right.
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badjuju View Post
I've had my boot toe touch down and grind itself on the pavement many times and never had it "stick", as you called it. You obviously hit a pavement crack, joint or seam with the toe of your boot.

That being said, you wrote that you had enjoyed the heck out of dragging pegs and boots for some period of time prior to the accident and you should take some time to analyze what happened, what you were doing, attention level, etc. Sounds to me as if it was prolly a one-time event where several unforeseeable events/conditions came to pass at the same place/time ... It also sounds likely that maybe you were being a bit too lazy or blase' about your foot position on the pegs, which was a contributing factor to your injury. Keep them big 13.5 size feet tucked in from now on!!!
Yeah, as soon as I get this damn cast off ............ I'm gonna go out on the bike and do some" homework".

The section of road I was riding is sorta' rough. Like you said, I probably hit some kind of "feature" on the road surface that I didn't see. I really try to NOT be lazy with my feet though. I obviously do need to make some sort of adjustment in what I'm doing.

Thanks for the input Badjuju. Rob
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:45 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaddix View Post
Yeah I was warned about this issue by mr captain crash so I quit allowing my boots to scrape. Lean into the turn more with your body so nothing touches the ground!
I need a "track day" or two.

Quote:
Originally Posted by advNZer? View Post
i move my feet back on the pegs so that i am the balls of my feet,and i keep my feet in.If nothing else its a waste of boot soles
I do something similar advNZer, but obviously, I'm not moving them back quite far enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sphyrnidus View Post
Well my feet aren't as big as yours, site 12. But I try never to scrape my feet on the pavement. You wear your boots down and it is as you found out dangerous at times. So like the guy said pull your feet back a bit.
I ride a GSA and corner it as flat as it will go and I almost never scrape my boot on the pavement.
I see a lot of riders with there feet turned outwards. Just don't do that!
I definitely DON'T turn my feet outward. That's just asking for trouble. When I ride at my very most aggressive on a loaded bike, I've scraped the outside of my panniers. I've only done this a handful of times in 95K miles on my current bike ........... but it'll scare the piss out of you when you are ALREADY scraping pegs and scootin boots, and then something else hits that not "breakaway"! I was probably close to doing this when I hurt my foot. I had it laid over pretty far for me.
Thanks sphyrnidus!
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:50 PM   #23
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Breakfast

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Originally Posted by BuilderScott View Post
Damn Rob, glad it wasn't worse. Heal fast! How many breakfast beers did you have that morning?
Rested and sober is no way to go through life ............ but it's the right way to ride a bike.
No beers that morning .... REALLY! That afternoon ............ different story.

Nice to get to visit with you in Echo Park Scott. Always good to put a face with a name! Hopefully see you around.
Rob
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:54 PM   #24
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Flames!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Graniteone View Post
Hey Rob,

Sorry to hear about your "damage". I one time put my foot down at the wrong moment while sitting and negotiating some rocks in a turn and was going fast enough to have my foot get kicked back towards the back of the bike. Scared me straight. Leg was bruised but otherwise fine. Heal up and you'll be twisting the throttle again soon enough.
Sounds like you dodged a bullet!

Thanks for the "get well" wishes Steve! Mrs. Road Damage is currently doing a paint job on my cast! I'll put a picture up when she's finished!
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:53 PM   #25
garandman
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Ever done track days or taken a track riding course?

Edit

Quote:
Originally Posted by ROAD DAMAGE View Post
I need a "track day" or two. :!
Most touring riders leave their butts in the seat and lean the bike. It's slow at best and unsafe at worst. Some even brag about dragging hard parts, not realizing if you are dragging hard parts it is an indication of poor technique.

Most any track day organization will conduct seminars or training on body position to help understand why and how to get your body into position. There are many YouTube videos, here's one.

Tall bikes like Adv bikes won't normally let you "drag a knee" so don't worry about it. They also have relatively high bars so your body position will differ from sport bike riders. But it is the lateral positioning that's important, along with learning good practices for braking and throttle input.

Some examples. In a bowl at NHMS probably going 45-55 mph. See how close my foot and pegs are to dragging? They aren't - even on a V-Strom which like most touring bikes has the pegs set lower and forward compared to sport bikes. They're not really closer than the sport bike behind me.


Prior to entering that turn. I've slid my butt over so that one butt cheek is on the saddle but the other half is to the inside of the upcoming turn. My outer knee is locked onto the tank so I can provide very fine inputs. I'm looking ahead as far as I can.


Here's the same point in the course, at nearly the same speed (probably 75-80mph) on an SV650S. See how the pegs are much higher and farther back, the shape of the fuel tank helps lock your knee in, and the bars are much lower facilitating the inward lean? Much better for courses, much worse for riding for hours. The basic technique is the same.


Here's another example on a Tiger 1050 (not an adventure bike - it's a sporty bike with an upright riding position suitable for us old guys) with a GSX-R rider behind me. Another tall bike with low, forward pegs. Note that other than my upper body being more upright due to street bars and my leg at less of an angle due to the taller seat, both of us are well off the seat to the inside of the turn and nothing is remotely close to scraping.


Have I ever dragged the pegs? Yes - mostly on my first couple of track days.


Here's the body position I was rockin my first time.


My second time, going much faster with less bike lean. But like most beginners I started moving my butt while keeping my upper body leaned back away from the turn. Compare that to the ones above.


To put it in perspective, the racers are 10-20 seconds a lap faster than me on the same bike. There is always more to learn.
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garandman screwed with this post 06-17-2013 at 02:04 AM
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:36 AM   #26
ROAD DAMAGE OP
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Ouch!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lineareagle View Post
You REALLY want to keep your toes tight to the bike or you might end up with:



It is called a butterfly fracture. Very common in skiing and snowboarding as well.
Foot rotates, ankle rotates but knee doesn't and two bones fracture with the Tibia in three pieces.
BTW this break happened before the bike low sided, like you I felt it catch. But in my case I also felt and heard it break.

So to answer your question, yes I have. I now try to avoid it at all cost.
"FELT AND HEARD IT BREAK" ............ Ughhhhh! What a bad visual just before lunch!

Some of us just have to learn our lessons the hard way, right lineareagle?

Rob
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:39 AM   #27
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boots

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingfixer View Post


These are the boots I ride in. The part in the circle are called toe sliders, I have worn out a few sets of these. There is nothing wrong with dragging a toe (the side of your foot) as long as you put the peg under the balls of your feet, tuck your feet into the bike, toes pointed slightly inward, and wear the proper foot wear. Ride On!!!!

On the other hand, I have hit a few cat eyes with a foot down, that hurts like a mother!!
Wingfixer, I don't doubt for a minute that we wouldn't be having this conversation if I had been wearing a little more "ride specific gear" that morning. Hopefully, I'll get it all figured out before it wears me all out!

Thanks, Rob
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:46 AM   #28
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Thanks for feedback!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mb90535im View Post
I have big wide feet and a new pair of Alpinestar Scouts I'm trying my best to avoid dragging. Can't seem to find sliders for them.

I'm trying real hard to practice balls on the pegs and toes slightly in and try to not drag my toe at all if I can help it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciferMutt View Post
Ride with your balls of your feet on the pegs! I see so many people riding around with their huge clodhoppers hanging out to the sides of the pegs...very dangerous, as you found out the hard way! Sorry to hear of your injuries.
I'm living and learning ........... slowly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Huzband View Post
Learn body position & foot placement. Track schools, like CSS would be a great help. No need to drag hard parts if you're doing it right.
I'd love to be able to do some track days and get some instruction. It's on my bucket list! Thanks, Rob
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Old 06-18-2013, 04:09 PM   #29
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track days

Hi garandman,

Thanks for all the pictures, instruction and video!

I've been wanting to do some track time/track days for a long time. It's on my list. I know that it would make me a much better and safer rider. I'll just have to save my money and make it a priority some spring or fall.

I've tried to play around with changing my body positions, but find it difficult to do this in the "real world" with any consistency. Again, track day needed! Thanks for the input! I appreciate it.

On another note .............. my wife is painting my cast. So far I've got flames, an ADV oval, a Road Damage sign, and Safety Third around the top. When she finishes it, I'll get a picture and post it up! Trying to have some fun with the injury!

Rob
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