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Old 06-04-2013, 09:18 AM   #1
sein OP
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May be moving to Netherlands...how hard would it be to bring my bike?

I may be moving from the US to the Netherlands later this year, and would love to bring my bike. It's a husky TE-610 with the Leo Vince exhaust.

From what I've read so far, I shouldn't need to pay an import tax on the value of the vehicle as long as I don't plan on selling it since it would be considered part of my household. It also sounds like I may be able to ride it with American plates for 3 months before being required to register it and get a local license plate. Does anyone know if this is easy and straightforward for a foreign bike, or will I run into issues with different emissions standards or something else?

And if anyone has recommendations for good places to ride (on or off pavement), I'm all ears.
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Old 06-04-2013, 10:49 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sein View Post
From what I've read so far, I shouldn't need to pay an import tax on the value of the vehicle as long as I don't plan on selling it since it would be considered part of my household.
Question - are you military (or working directly for them) or purely in a civilian mode?

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And if anyone has recommendations for good places to ride (on or off pavement), I'm all ears.
Not a lot of off road at all in Europe. LOTS of great roads, though.

Unfortunately, you're starting from a densely settled location with lots of traffic. Head south to the Eifel region of Belgium & Germany for some great roads, and even further south to a range of hills called the Alps to totally blow your mind.
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:40 PM   #3
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'Range of hills' I like it...enough off road riding in France (but not in them 'hills') to keep you going for a very long time..if not forever. Get bored in France and there is always Spain/Portugal.
Mountains, forest tracks, gravel trails etc. No desert..but plenty of dirt!
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:02 PM   #4
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There's plenty of good trailriding in France and the UK.
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:37 PM   #5
Rinty
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Sein:

I helped my step sister's husband buy and export a Harley from Canada to Holland, a few years ago. He used a logistics service in Holland, and from what I understand, it wasn't too difficult to get the bike to comply with Dutch regulations. Of course, our bikes have metric speedometers and daytime running lights, so that's two fewer potential items to deal with.

If someone from the Netherlands doesn't chime in here, you might want to consider having your local freight forwarder recommend a service in Rotterdam to help you.

You will find that most of the Dutch speak excellent English.
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Old 06-04-2013, 04:31 PM   #6
sein OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJ View Post
Question - are you military (or working directly for them) or purely in a civilian mode?
Purely civilian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJ View Post
Not a lot of off road at all in Europe. LOTS of great roads, though.

Unfortunately, you're starting from a densely settled location with lots of traffic. Head south to the Eifel region of Belgium & Germany for some great roads, and even further south to a range of hills called the Alps to totally blow your mind.
I've ridden some of the alps before, and absolutely intend to explore them some more. They're definitely some of the most pleasant hills I've had the opportunity to climb I've never been west of Germany, though, and don't know much about how different the roads are, yet. I have heard traffic in the Netherlands can be pretty bad, though. Anyone know if lane splitting is legal there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rinty
Of course, our bikes have metric speedometers and daytime running lights, so that's two fewer potential items to deal with.
The husky fortunately has a digital speedometer which I'm pretty sure can be reconfigured to read in km (I haven't gotten around to digging out my manual to try this yet, though).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rinty
If someone from the Netherlands doesn't chime in here, you might want to consider having your local freight forwarder recommend a service in Rotterdam to help you.
That's a good idea. I'll look around to see what I can find.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:30 AM   #7
Hellracer.nl
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Lane splitting is allowed as long as you keep your speed down.
The west of the Netherlands is 1 of the densest populated areas in the world. Traffic can be very heavy on the highway's and in the city's. Highway lane's are half as wide as in the States, cars ride bumper to bumper and still try to maintain speeds of 60mp/h or more.
There are many beautiful roads to explore in the Netherlands but you have to know where they are.
Importing your bike shouldn't be a problem as long as your bike is according to the factory specs. A Leo exhaust may be too loud. Try to bring an original exhaust just for importing.

The official agency for importing a bike or car is RDW. They have an international visitors site:
http://www.rdw.nl/internationalvisit...s/default.aspx

If you need help, don't hesitate to contact me.
Good luck!
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Old 06-11-2013, 11:01 AM   #8
Gener
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Thumb Importing your bike to NL

No problem getting your bike in as household goods. if it is a year old and you have proof it was registered in your name, you are good. You then need to get a temporary registration from the RDW then get RDW inspection, to ensure it's Euro legal, pay some registration and inspection fees etc. Then have a plate made for you, available at most auto parts shops and you are done. The road awaits
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Old 06-17-2013, 01:11 AM   #9
sein OP
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Thanks for the info! Everything is finally set and I'll be moving to Rotterdam soon. I've gotten a pretty wide range of prices (between about $500-$2000) for shipping my bike overseas, but one of the cheaper ones will actually ship it straight to Rotterdam (one company wanted to ship it to Belgium instead, and most wouldn't ship to Rotterdam even if they shipped to the Netherlands).

I'm currently scrambling to find an apartment in Rotterdam, but I'm very excited to explore and get to know the area once I'm there!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellracer.nl
Importing your bike shouldn't be a problem as long as your bike is according to the factory specs. A Leo exhaust may be too loud. Try to bring an original exhaust just for importing.
The previous owner put the Leo pipe on, so I don't have the original. I'll keep my eye open in case I can pick one up cheaply, though.
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Old 06-17-2013, 12:09 PM   #10
Rinty
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You'll like Holland - it's great.

For an interesting bike trip that's not too far, try Normandie Province in France.
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Old 06-17-2013, 02:47 PM   #11
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Hi
I live in the Rotterdam area. It was already posted, but look at the RDW site. If you stay here longer than 185 day's you'll have to get a Dutch driving license. I don't know if you have a motorcycle license over there, but if not, I'm not sure if you'll get an Dutch Motorcycle license automatically.
There are quite a lot of nice roads in the Netherlands too, but off-road riding is not so easy as in some other places.
The bike you can bring as part of household and if it is a bike that's also sold in Europe, getting it qualified for street use won't be a big problem. But be sure it complies with the noise regulations as stated before, at least put the DB killer in. Also running lights, the blinkers burning all the time is not allowed, but most motorcycles have there dimmed headlights always on.
Lane splitting is allowed, but it has some regulations. It is only allowed if traffic is moving slower than 50 km/hr, which is about 30 m/hr and when there are more than two lanes, ride between the lanes on the left.
As for rider equipment: you have to wear a helmet, other than that you might be naked. It is not advised, but there are no rules (yet).
If you need advice or help feel free to ask and I'll see what I can do :)

There is, of course, also a motor forum with lots of knowledgeable people and even of posted in English, there are always people willing to help.
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sphyrnidus screwed with this post 06-17-2013 at 02:51 PM Reason: more info added
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Old 06-17-2013, 07:47 PM   #12
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I sure as hell would be excited about this move.
Enjoy.
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Old 06-18-2013, 12:48 PM   #13
GiorgioXT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sein View Post
The previous owner put the Leo pipe on, so I don't have the original. I'll keep my eye open in case I can pick one up cheaply, though.
Leovince is an italian company , and maybe your exhaust is compliant, ask them to send you an homologation certificate of your pipe or of a similar homologated one ...
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Old 06-18-2013, 02:04 PM   #14
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I keep my Dakar in NL and ride it during the summer all over Europe and Asia. It has been this way since 2010. Never bothered registering it there. Keep your drivers license with a US address. Helps too as well with the numerous speeding / red light camera's. No need to pay registration fees in the US either.

I know squat about registering the bike in Holland, but don't underestimate the hoops and money it takes to do anything there that involves the government and banks.

FWIW

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Old 06-19-2013, 12:36 AM   #15
sein OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sphyrnidus
If you stay here longer than 185 day's you'll have to get a Dutch driving license. I don't know if you have a motorcycle license over there, but if not, I'm not sure if you'll get an Dutch Motorcycle license automatically.
The motorcycle portion of my license is separate from the car portion, and does require its own test. However, it doesn't look like USA licenses can be automatically exchanged for a Dutch one. I'm not worried about taking a test for motorcycling skills, but I haven't driven a car in around four or five years. Any idea if both tests are required?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GiorgioXT
Leovince is an italian company , and maybe your exhaust is compliant, ask them to send you an homologation certificate of your pipe or of a similar homologated one ...
That's a good idea! I sent them an e-mail about it and will see what they say.

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I know squat about registering the bike in Holland, but don't underestimate the hoops and money it takes to do anything there that involves the government and banks.
Hah, that's a fair point :)

It seems from what I've read so far that in order to get a reasonably-priced parking pass the bike will need a Dutch license plate (the rates for 'visitor' passes are much higher). I'm not sure yet if I'll be able to find a place to rent which includes a parking space or if I'll be stuck with street parking, but it would sure simplify the move if I didn't need to worry about registering the bike immediately.
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