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Old 07-14-2013, 01:55 PM   #241
biker128pedal
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Last year I did have a cataract in the right eye when we road. I road the Full Bores on Mud Road, some gravel and the street. They work better off road then the Anakee 2s but I don't think they will last nearly as long.
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Old 07-14-2013, 07:42 PM   #242
jdrocks OP
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Last year I did have a cataract in the right eye...
you better get them eyes fixed up or you'll find yourself riding pillion behind Mr. Nix on our next trip. i'm sure he won't mind, but still...
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Old 07-14-2013, 08:46 PM   #243
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when i first met you in Dawson, this little voice in my head said "This guy looks like something someone went and dragged outta a ditch", good to know my intuitive senses were well calibrated. see, there's a lesson in every story.
That REALLY hurts Dave....
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Old 07-14-2013, 09:17 PM   #244
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That REALLY hurts Dave....

hey eddie, you'll feel a lot better when you sober up in a day or two, that Labatt Blue will put the hurt on ya every time. you should try Bud Light.

on a more cheery note, i'll be into the Yukon in a couple days, and it will your turn for center stage, you'll be a star...even if ya did get yanked outta a ditch.
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Old 07-15-2013, 05:01 AM   #245
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Back on the highway, I didn’t waste any time kicking into 6th, once again I was running out of time, and maybe weather. I ran past 93 coming up from the southwest, also called the Banff Parkway, then on towards Lake Louise at the junction of 93 and 1. The Icefields Parkway gate was just north of the intersection, and after a very confused conversation with the gate attendant in which I claimed both a senior discount and a hearing disability, I accessed the Parkway without paying a cent. Maybe she was just hoarse from all the shouting and gave up, or could be that seniors were free after all. My earplugs had blocked all conversation, man, those things were really jammed in there because of that Leo Vince, the exhaust over run was like dropping a handful of cherry bombs in a 55 gallon drum.

Light traffic southbound, mostly rental RVs and truck campers with Euros at the wheel, plus some vehicles on the way up to Jasper. I had been on this road several times, and while I was sure I would enjoy the ride, I didn’t plan many stops.

I did stop at BowLake in an attempt to capture the turquoise color of the water, the result of the mineral content in the spring runoff, and quite striking in this setting.



BowPass was near the lake, the Bow river flowing south along the Parkway, while the Continental Divide, and also the provincial border between Alberta and BC, was located at the peaks west of the lake.

Running along with some fast northbound traffic, Mt.Willindon to the east, the views impressive, and I was soon up to the intersection with 11 running west from Rocky Mountain House.





The facility was known as Saskatchewan Crossing, full services were available here, but the reason for stopping was to top off the fuel, I didn’t need a repeat of that Banff episode, and the next fuel was Jasper. I burst out laughing when I saw the pump price, $1.90CDN per liter for regular, a new all time record for me, and maybe a reason for the noticeable lack of US plated vehicles up here. I asked the attendant at the kiosk whether anyone ever complained about the fuel price, and he relied “You’re the first one since about five minutes ago”. The Saskatchewan River was opposite the highway, the reason for the post at this location years earlier.

Now that I had fuel for Jasper, I didn’t hold anything back, and was up to the interpretive center at the Columbia Icefield quickly, heck, they even had those too cool for school glacier buses, man, I need one of them things, got some HOV lanes I’d like to run on my way to the beach.



Didn’t seem like there was as much ice as the last time I’d been here, but the mountains were still worth a look.





Mt.Columbia, the highest peak in Alberta at a little over 12000 feet, obscured by cloud cover.



I was getting restless with this long day of riding, and threw more gas on the fire, then quickly on the brakes, animals might make a great photo, but they scare the heck out of ya on a moto. People feed the damn things along park roads, they get acclimated to traffic, then wander out into a vehicle grill…or moto.



I blew past the lodge on the lake, the one with all those nice log cabins near the Parkway gate, way beyond my budget, then on into Jasper for fuel. It looked like summer festival time in Jasper, crowded, but I asked a local at the quick mart what the lodging situation looked like, got “Summer rates, nothing under $150, good luck”, and decided I’d better rent Mike’s tent for free. Jasper had a much different feel than Banff, although sometimes they’re lumped together when talking about the Parkway. I’d take Jasper.

Now that camping was in play, I knew the destination, and got my head together for one last run on the day. I didn’t like being on the road this late, can’t fool the animals time-wise despite daylight, but there wasn’t exactly a choice, and away I went.

West on 16, the Yellowhead, for 15 miles and I was soon over to the British Columbia border, another milestone, entering Mt. Robson Park and crossing the Continental Divide at Yellowhead Pass at the same time.





From there it was about a 30 mile ride to Mt.Robson itself, and I was hopeful that the store at the visitor center would be open. I tried to stop here if on the Yellowhead, snap a photo of the mountain, a brief tribute to Bill Atchison, a rider I last saw at this spot, then dead in Mexico a short time later.



The store was open when I rode by the front door, then closed when I came back 5 minutes later, hmmmm, I guess it will be slim pickin’s for dinner.

The ProvincialPark was across the road, I cruised over, passing some campers, no waves, a loud exhaust is never welcome at any campground housing the early to bed and late to rise crowd. Didn’t take long to select a camping site, conveniently near the exit, I planned an early start. I hadn’t even removed anything from the bike when the young camp hostess came by to collect the fee, cute and sassy, what’s not to like in that package. Bummed a flat surfaced piece of firewood from her to place under the sidestand, then went about setting up Mike’s brand new tent, and it went up fast, never even looked at the directions.





I sat at the picnic table, tired, ate up the little I had with me, chased that gourmet meal with some of Mike’s bourbon, and added notes to the journal. The day was cooling as the sun got lower, must be 20 hours of daylight at this latitude. My little Marmot bag was fluffed inside the tent, I hadn’t bothered getting out Mike’s sleeping pad, don’t use one much anymore, kinda the reverse of the norm. The bugs weren’t bad by northern standards, but I retired to the tent, zipped in behind the netting. It was 2AM eastern, late for me but full daylight here. Stretched out in the tent, the familiar disbelief of actually lying down after an unbelievable day of travel, and my last conscious thought was of another day and another northern road, places I needed to be, over the horizon, a road through time.

(to be continued…)
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Old 07-15-2013, 10:14 AM   #246
fasteddiecopeman
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...Now that I had fuel for Jasper, I didn’t hold anything back, and was up to the interpretive center at the Columbia Icefield quickly, heck, they even had those too cool for school glacier buses, man, I need one of them things, got some HOV lanes I’d like to run on my way to the beach....(to be continued…)
Just curious - how'd you like Sunwapta Pass? (That's that nicely banked 270 degree turn after Saskatchewan River Crossing, leading into the climb to the Icefields....)
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Old 07-15-2013, 10:16 AM   #247
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Jasper had a much different feel than Banff, although sometimes they’re lumped together when talking about the Parkway. I’d take Jasper....(to be continued…)
Absolutely agree w/ you - Jasper almost feels like it's in a 'time-warp', stuck in the '50s, while Banff feels like ANY large town, but w/ some serious "hills"....
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Old 07-15-2013, 12:04 PM   #248
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Just curious - how'd you like Sunwapta Pass? (That's that nicely banked 270 degree turn after Saskatchewan River Crossing, leading into the climb to the Icefields....)
those passes on the Icefields are the subtle kind, so is the Yellowhead, and the analogy would be the Maclaren Summit, second highest pass in Alaska that you crossed on the Denali several weeks ago. very gradual accent and descent.
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Old 07-15-2013, 12:13 PM   #249
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Absolutely agree w/ you - Jasper almost feels like it's in a 'time-warp', stuck in the '50s, while Banff feels like ANY large town, but w/ some serious "hills"....
besides the towns themselves, they seem to attract completely different groups of visitors.
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Old 07-15-2013, 03:07 PM   #250
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Deer fence?

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i don't think they WANT to dig post holes, but there may be some other reason.

now you'll have to circulate the question around your rancher network, the flatlanders need to know.
I recall seeing a similar design in an ag magazine, supposedly they can't judge it to jump it.
Just one possible explanation.
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Old 07-15-2013, 04:07 PM   #251
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besides the towns themselves, they seem to attract completely different groups of visitors.
I'd HAVE to agree:
Banff - yuppies and orientals; and
Jasper - hippies, aging and otherwise.
My folks honeymooned in Jasper, by skiing 15 miles into the Tonquin Valley (west of Mt Edith Cavell, or from the Marmot Basin Ski area) back in 1939 with a bunch of friends, camping in tents and the mountaineers' lodge there, one HELLUVA honeymoon trip.

IF you wanted to ski down a hill - FINE! CLIMB it FIRST....

...Guess THAT'S how I got to be SO tough Dave....
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Old 07-15-2013, 05:17 PM   #252
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I recall seeing a similar design in an ag magazine, supposedly they can't judge it to jump it.
Just one possible explanation.
not for deer, deer fence is at least 8' high and you do see those ranches were they have fenced for trophy deer herd management.

still a mystery...i should ask in west regional.
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Old 07-15-2013, 05:49 PM   #253
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My folks honeymooned in Jasper, by skiing 15 miles into the Tonquin Valley (west of Mt Edith Cavell, or from the Marmot Basin Ski area) back in 1939...


...Guess THAT'S how I got to be SO tough Dave....
i think you have Banff and Jasper pegged.

i didn't mention it in the report, but Mike's bike was nearly confiscated in Jasper when i parked it at a bicycle rack. fortunately, the day was saved by a friendly Scotsman on a bit of a toot..."Mister, ye have to move that, the authorities will come fetch it, issue you a citation ta boot, eh".

my paternal grandparents spent their honeymoon on a long canoe trip in Canuckistan in 1915, of course, it was still shown on the maps as Canada back then. must have been their idea of a cruise.


and what's this "tough" nonsense?
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Old 07-15-2013, 07:39 PM   #254
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I rode from Calgary to Prince George today. It was a chilly 51°, so I layered up, closed my vents, put the rain cover on my seat and headed out. The rain hit about 20 miles into the ride. It continued off and on until just before I reached Jasper at lunch time. Because I had planned to go through Calgary, I'd followed the story of the floods and had seen pictures of the Trans Canada washed away. They've done a remarkable job of repairing it. If you didn't know the extent of the damage, you probably wouldn't even notice the repairs. It's apparent that there has been road work, but it doesn't look like anything more than routine maintenance. Helluva job.

The route took me up the Icefields Parkway and I would have been sorely disappointed if I hadn't seen it previously. Most of the ride was socked in with low visibility.
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Old 07-15-2013, 09:16 PM   #255
MTrider16
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I recall seeing a similar design in an ag magazine, supposedly they can't judge it to jump it.
Just one possible explanation.
That might work that way for cows. They are pretty particular about their footing. It might also tangle them up.

The part about not digging post holes might also have something to do with it.

David
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