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Old 06-15-2013, 02:32 PM   #16
davebig
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Front Tires

The experiment (suffering) continues, below are my front tire experiments and I'm done now,l-r Blizzak 145/65/15.Nankang 145/80/15,Dunlop Graspic 145/65/15.I'm working on the home front with a sore knee so I changed back to the Nankang it's the best all around tire, if I had a LL fork I could raise the front a bit more and the winter tires would be more desirable. They steer very fast on good pavement but are easy to manage, on bad pavement and gravel with much of a crown they are difficult and I have to be careful not to oversteer, on crappy rutted roads they are great the winter treads edges grab a hold and pull up out of ruts easily.Interestingly enough 1.5 " taller tire really only raises the axle .5 ".DB


I have to reverse myself did 150 miles on 145/80 front went home and changed back to the 145/65 series Blizzak which really is .5" taller than the Dunlop Graspic I think it may be more about trail reduction and flexible sidewalls but overall I prefer the little tire.DB
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davebig screwed with this post 06-17-2013 at 07:17 AM
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Old 06-16-2013, 03:50 PM   #17
Old Mule
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tires

Thanks, interesting. What tires do old VW sedans use?
Is there such a thing as a 125 or 135 15 inch tire?
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:34 PM   #18
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VW tire sizes

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=372013
Anywhere from 145-165 15's or 5.60 x15
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Old 06-16-2013, 08:59 PM   #19
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I have a 135/70R15 70Tp ContiEcoContact EP on my rig.


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Old 06-17-2013, 01:00 PM   #20
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My 67 bug has 165hr15 which basicly the same as 16580r15.When I first got my tire setup it had that finland snow tire on it.The tire seperated on the way to Sedala in 100 degree heat. Thats when I bought the Nangkang.Which is turning out to be a nice tire.Rode in a nasty storm last weekend it held th road great.But I still want to build a spare tire for traveling. That tire setup will be more like a snow tread than a street tread..
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:24 AM   #21
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My Car Tire Experience...

Almost two years ago I mounted the only car tire I could find that would fit the cast aluminum wheel of my Victory V92C - a Dunlop SP winter run-on-flat 165/60R-16. The stock size for the bike's rear tire is a 160/80B-16 and this one's smaller profile lowered the bike by nearly an inch. This necessitated some adjusting of the sidecar and had the effect of slightly gearing down the bike (and throwing my speedo off by about 8-10% compared to the GPS).

I fully expected to get at least 10,000 miles or more from a car tire based on how long they last on cars and trucks these days, but now it's completely worn out and I'm about to change it out after just over 7,200 miles. I'm not sure if being a winter tire it may have had a softer tread compound or if the nature of running a hack did it in, but in any case it was a disappointment. I will say that the extra width and consequently more rubber surface on the road made the bike feel more planted.

Anyone from the northern regions have a thought on whether the tire wore faster because it was a "winter" tire?

Photo of the tire as I mounted it in 2011:


Another image from the side:
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:28 AM   #22
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[QUOTE=GSBS;21672088]Almost two years ago I mounted the only car tire I could find that would fit the cast aluminum wheel of my Victory V92C - a Dunlop SP winter run-on-flat 165/60R-16. The stock size for the bike's rear tire is a 160/80B-16 and this one's smaller profile lowered the bike by nearly an inch. This necessitated some adjusting of the sidecar and had the effect of slightly gearing down the bike (and throwing my speedo off by about 8-10% compared to the GPS).

I fully expected to get at least 10,000 miles or more from a car tire based on how long they last on cars and trucks these days, but now it's completely worn out and I'm about to change it out after just over 7,200 miles. I'm not sure if being a winter tire it may have had a softer tread compound or if the nature of running a hack did it in, but in any case it was a disappointment. I will say that the extra width and consequently more rubber surface on the road made the bike feel more planted.

Anyone from the northern regions have a thought on whether the tire wore faster because it was a "winter" tire?


I' in the N climes but I'm clueless unless it was way under-inflated ,is there any pathology like the center went first ?
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:45 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davebig View Post
I' in the N climes but I'm clueless unless it was way under-inflated ,is there any pathology like the center went first ?
Well, the center did go first, but I kept a fairly close eye on it and it was always inflated between 32-35 psi.
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Old 06-18-2013, 11:04 AM   #24
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inflationary value

Quote:
Originally Posted by GSBS View Post
Well, the center did go first, but I kept a fairly close eye on it and it was always inflated between 32-35 psi.
That I believe is your problem. A car tire on a bike is not going to be handling the forces that it would on a car. Inflating it to 35psi is like inflating it to about 90psi if it were on a car. I ran mine at about 12-16psi and got almost 30K miles out of it and this was riding it in all types of conditions pretty much year round.
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Old 06-18-2013, 12:14 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
That I believe is your problem. A car tire on a bike is not going to be handling the forces that it would on a car. Inflating it to 35psi is like inflating it to about 90psi if it were on a car. I ran mine at about 12-16psi and got almost 30K miles out of it and this was riding it in all types of conditions pretty much year round.
Hmmm... I never considered running it that low. It is, after all, a 700-pound behemoth before adding gas, oil and sidecar. What bike were you on running the tire with 12-16 psi?
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Old 06-18-2013, 02:37 PM   #26
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You are thinking in terms of motorcycle tire when you should be thinking in terms of car tire. 700+lbs is far lower than what a car tire is designed to handle. A car tire manufacturer designs a tire that will experience forces above 4000lbs. Exceleration, de celeration, lateral forces and road conditions for a car are far different. I doubt that your bike tire ever experienced the sudden shift of 4000lbs being thrust upon it as it would have had it been on a car. You would think that 12-16psi would be to low but on a bike it isn't. I used to build and run off road vehicles and most of the time we would run 44's at that pressure and lower. Even with a higher sidewall profile we never experienced catastrophic tire failure unless you count a sharp boulder acting as an outside force.
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Old 06-18-2013, 02:49 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
You are thinking in terms of motorcycle tire when you should be thinking in terms of car tire. 700+lbs is far lower than what a car tire is designed to handle. A car tire manufacturer designs a tire that will experience forces above 4000lbs. Exceleration, de celeration, lateral forces and road conditions for a car are far different. I doubt that your bike tire ever experienced the sudden shift of 4000lbs being thrust upon it as it would have had it been on a car. You would think that 12-16psi would be to low but on a bike it isn't. I used to build and run off road vehicles and most of the time we would run 44's at that pressure and lower. Even with a higher sidewall profile we never experienced catastrophic tire failure unless you count a sharp boulder acting as an outside force.
So, when I mount up the tire I just bought - conventional cruiser motorcycle that's spec'd for the bike - should I run less air than would normally be called for since it's on the tug for the hack? Or does running low pressure only apply to car tires on bikes? On the previous ones I've run around 35 psi.
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Old 06-18-2013, 07:13 PM   #28
davebig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
You are thinking in terms of motorcycle tire when you should be thinking in terms of car tire. 700+lbs is far lower than what a car tire is designed to handle. A car tire manufacturer designs a tire that will experience forces above 4000lbs. Exceleration, de celeration, lateral forces and road conditions for a car are far different. I doubt that your bike tire ever experienced the sudden shift of 4000lbs being thrust upon it as it would have had it been on a car. You would think that 12-16psi would be to low but on a bike it isn't. I used to build and run off road vehicles and most of the time we would run 44's at that pressure and lower. Even with a higher sidewall profile we never experienced catastrophic tire failure unless you count a sharp boulder acting as an outside force.
Very interesting I've got car tires everywhere,I'mm going to run the back down to 26 and the front to 28 and see what I think.The runflat on the cruiser I would think had very stiff sidewalls. I know my back 175/65 doesn't look low until way under 20(had a slow leak)I'm running front harder as the 145/80 that was on there worked better (less sidewall flex ?) Onward and forward it will be fun to do some changes.DB
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Old 06-18-2013, 07:59 PM   #29
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As usual, you can color me confused. I simply cannot imagine running ANY tire on my rig at 14psi.

While I'm not staring at the tire right now, IIRC The Vredesteins I have on tug and tub say max load 1400# at 44psi.

Elmer ran them at 28psi; I've been running them at 32-34psi. they have over 15,000 miles on them. Another inmate who shall go unnamed [unless he wants to chime in and identify himself] recommends a MINIMUM of 35psi for his wheels.

Of course, they are mounted on Car wheels, not motorcycle wheels.

GSBS: Your picture looks like you have the tire on an MC wheel??? Maybe that is a crucial difference.

My 2c,
Duncan
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Old 06-19-2013, 12:27 AM   #30
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As usual, you can color me confused. I simply cannot imagine running ANY tire on my rig at 14psi.

While I'm not staring at the tire right now, IIRC The Vredesteins I have on tug and tub say max load 1400# at 44psi.

Elmer ran them at 28psi; I've been running them at 32-34psi. they have over 15,000 miles on them. Another inmate who shall go unnamed [unless he wants to chime in and identify himself] recommends a MINIMUM of 35psi for his wheels.

Of course, they are mounted on Car wheels, not motorcycle wheels.

GSBS: Your picture looks like you have the tire on an MC wheel??? Maybe that is a crucial difference.

My 2c,
Duncan
The type of wheel has no effect on the tire except for forces acted upon by sprung/unsprung weight. There are a whole slew of mathematical calculations that apply and a lot of big words to describe all of the different forces that act upon tires in different situations. I'm not saying that no one here would understand them, quite the contrary, just that it is a very long and complicated explanation. Suffice it to say that a car tire in one situation, say a pot hole, will have different forces applied to it on a car than it would mounted on a motorcycle. On a car alone, the front tires will have different forces applied than the rear. And again, a front wheel drive car will impart different forces than a rear wheel drive car. It goes without saying that a car weighs considerably more than a motorcycle even with a hack mounted to it and loaded to capacity so why would you put the same psi load on a tire that does not share the same mass?
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