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Old 07-03-2013, 08:16 PM   #211
trailrider383
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I think you need a couple more Road Toads. Here are two for sale about 35 minutes from me.

http://boise.craigslist.org/mcy/3890008444.html

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Old 07-03-2013, 09:36 PM   #212
bymbie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Lewis View Post
Would like to hear from the wife and her side of this adventure.
I have to applaud you for this suggestion Sometimes we get so caught up with the rider and the bike that we forget about the support...
As we learned in Dazed and Confused: "Behind every good man there is a woman, and that woman was Martha Washington, man, and everyday George would come home, she would have a big fat bowl waiting for him, man, when he come in the door, man, she was a hip, hip, hip lady, man."
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:21 AM   #213
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Day 28



Diamond Peak, Cascade Range, view near Crescent, OR


Day 28
Crescent to Glendale, OR
Like many small towns in this part of Oregon, Crescent’s economy seems to center around tourism and logging. This is the eastern side of the Cascades, and in the distance to the west I could see the spectacular view of the craggy summit of Mt.Thielsen and snow-covered Diamond Peak as I headed out of town past the huge lumber mill. Today I would be moving through heavily forested areas in the Cascades, between Lemolo and Diamond Lakes to the town of Dry Creek near the North Umpqua River for lunch. From there, I would climb ridges on the eastern side of the Cascades before finally dropping down to the town of Glendale, south of Roseburg near I-5.
The first leg of today’s ride was uneventful. The route was mostly over very well maintained, smooth and wide dirt and gravel forest service and county roads. There was a minor grade up Windigo Pass, and then a steep descent down the other side, but nothing difficult or technical at all. I enjoyed the easy nature of the ride and took my time enjoying the scenery. I was coming to the realization that my ride would be over by tomorrow if I could ride the terrain and if the Toad held together. As much as I would enjoy the accomplishment of finishing the TAT on the Hodaka, I felt a strange type of sadness knowing that my adventure would soon be over. The Toad was now running great, almost like it knew it was back home in Oregon. In fact, even with the old ignition it was running as well as it did at any point in the journey. This was almost mystical, considering the severe beating that it had taken over the past few weeks. The damaged rod SHOULD have failed by now. The clutch SHOULD be long gone with all of the slipping to get up the steep and rocky grades. Instead, it was buzzing along happily, just like it first did in 1978. The fork seals did not leak. I had not blown out the shocks. The spokes stayed tight. Weird. The only negative at this time was the gas mileage. With the points ignition, I was getting about 20% less miles per tank. (And yes, it was timed properly; I brought my dial gauge with me.) I needed to carry the extra fuel can now on any leg over 90 miles.
When I arrived at Dry Creek, Donna had yet to make it there with the camper on the steep mountain roads. I decided to call her to check on her progress, but there was no cell service here. The good folks at the Dry Creek Store (the only one in town) let me use their land line. Donna was only about 12 miles out of town, but was a little freaked because my Spot Locator was not broadcasting signals from under the forest canopy. It had been over 2 hours since my last signal, so she had assumed that something was wrong and so was relieved to get my call.
When Donna arrived, we bought sandwiches at the store’s deli and ate them outside at the covered picnic tables. The owners had pet chickens, who were soon at our feet begging for scraps. When one of the boldest ones jumped up on the table and snatched some of my chips, we knew it was time to leave. As I rounded the corner, there was a group of people around the Toad with a local man telling the onlookers about the Hodaka he had as a kid. It seems like every other person I have met on this trip past a certain age learned how to ride on one of these things.
Once back on the trail, the route moved to the south then southwest along a series of mountain ridges. Some of these had been logged either recently or in recent years. When an area is logged, sometimes existing roads and trails are buried and new ones created to ease access to the timber that is being harvested. The TAT had a few dead ends on this leg due to this situation. Sometimes there would be a road closed sign, other times the road would just end in a high berm that had been created by a bulldozer or in a pile of debris that was left by the logging operation. Even with the GPS, it was sometimes difficult to detour around these obstacles as the new logging roads crossed the old existing roads everywhere, and often these were dead ends. Make sure you have extra batteries for the GPS and your topo maps with you when navigating through this section.
About 20 miles from the end of day’s ride, I received a formidable challenge in the form of a very steep, long and rocky trail that went to the top of a ridge. I was certain this would be the end of the Toad’s clutch, as I had to slip it without mercy to keep the revs up to maintain forward momentum in first gear as I picked my way through the rocks. Truthfully, I don’t know how it made it to the top of the ridge, but it did. If the nearly bald Kenda 270 had broken traction at any point during that climb, it would have been over. It would have been difficult to get back down and then get any type of run at the hill for a second attempt. I would have had to look for a way around. The Toad surprised me with its ability yet again.
Coming down off the mountain, I intercepted Interstate 5 for the short ride into Glendale. It had been a good day. 228 miles traveled, 5.8 gallons of gas and 25 ounces of injector oil used. Only around 125 miles left to Port Orford. My right big toe has turned black, but it does not hurt that much. I will get it checked out after the ride.



Riding through the lumber mill in Crescent, OR.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:24 AM   #214
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Photos, Day 28



Forest terrain outside of Crescent, OR




The Windigo Pass summit.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:28 AM   #215
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Photos, Day 28



The craggy peak of Mt. Thielsen, Cascade Range.






A common sight on Oregon trails. Near Lake Lemolo.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:34 AM   #216
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Photos, Day 28



The chickens at the Dry Creek Store, before they noticed we had food.






Whitehorse Falls, Clearwater River, near Highway 138.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:38 AM   #217
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Photos, Day 28



The climb out of Dry Creek through a burned forest.




Clearcut logging, between Dry Creek and Glendale, OR.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:42 AM   #218
ABee OP
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Photos, Day 28



TAT route blocked off by a gravel berm. Between Dry Creek and Glendale, OR.






Here we go again. Between Dry Creek and Glendale, OR.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:47 AM   #219
ABee OP
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Photos, Day 28



Up on the ridge. Between Dry Creek and Glendale, OR.





The climb that should have finished off the Toad. Pictures don't do it justice.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:51 AM   #220
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Photos, Day 28



Another shot of the steep grade outside Glendale, OR.




A mineshaft on the side of the trail. Near Glendale, OR.
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Old 07-04-2013, 01:21 AM   #221
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One Less Harley- The water at Kelly Creek would have been over the cases of the Toad. I used the rickety wood bridge that other TAT riders have built over the creek to the north of the crossing, hidden in the brush. They had used debris from the outbuildings at the cabin to build it. Jim and Tom splashed through on their XRs the day after I crossed with no problems. Having close to 12 inches of travel has its advantages at times.

bymbie- The toe has turned black, but does not hurt that much. I think I just jammed it.

Gramp-Z- When I was a kid, it was the poor boys like me that had Hodakas. In those days, they were cheap and plentiful in my neighborhood. I paid less than $600 for the Toad brand new when I bought it for Donna 35 years ago.

Trailrider383- Two of them is enough for me!
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Old 07-04-2013, 06:26 AM   #222
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Cheap when I was young (1968) was whatever a 10 year old could make mowing lawns all summer . I think between my mini bike and my buddy's toad goat we had spent maybe $100 . Of course we bought frames and scrounged and built them ourselves . Those fancy Hodaka were what dreams were made of ! Carry on . Will you follow up next summer by riding the road of bones ? Or maybe the BAM road ? Once again , thanks for letting us follow along .
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Old 07-04-2013, 10:23 AM   #223
One Less Harley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABee View Post
One Less Harley- The water at Kelly Creek would have been over the cases of the Toad. I used the rickety wood bridge that other TAT riders have built over the creek to the north of the crossing, hidden in the brush. They had used debris from the outbuildings at the cabin to build it. Jim and Tom splashed through on their XRs the day after I crossed with no problems. Having close to 12 inches of travel has its advantages at times.

bymbie- The toe has turned black, but does not hurt that much. I think I just jammed it.

Gramp-Z- When I was a kid, it was the poor boys like me that had Hodakas. In those days, they were cheap and plentiful in my neighborhood. I paid less than $600 for the Toad brand new when I bought it for Donna 35 years ago.

Trailrider383- Two of them is enough for me!

Built a bridge...that went through my head when I was there. Pulled a pallet over there and was going to scavenge more wood from the building at the top of the hill...but Ken figured we would just try our luck at crossing to the right pass. There was once some sort of bridge to the extreme left. That water crossing cost me a good long night run 70 miles away....great fun!!!! It's the breakdowns and difficult things that you remember the most!!!
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Old 07-04-2013, 05:22 PM   #224
RobinsBro
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Great report!

ABee, thank you for taking the time to document this adventure. While I admire anyone who endeavors to complete the TAT, I find it especially inspiring to follow someone who dares it on an older/smaller bike. As many of us of a certain age, I remember when bikes ranging from 100-250cc's were considered big enough to take you most anywhere you wanted to go. Thank you for proving that is true even today.

Thanks again for taking us along.
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Old 07-04-2013, 05:42 PM   #225
stuntheavy
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Originally Posted by ABee View Post


TAT route blocked off by a gravel berm. Between Dry Creek and Glendale, OR.
I remember this exactly. Tried crossing it and the trail turns very grown in and very bad. Almost made us run out of fuel.


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