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Old 03-01-2014, 03:39 PM   #1
GPSeTravelguides OP
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OK, I am sure this has been answered before (I did search for new rider), but I wanted to learn how to ride a motorcycle so that I can ride when I travel. I have traveled to a lot of places around the world - Asia, Central and South America, Europe, Caribbean, Australia and a few other places - here are two of my galleries while I traveled Thailand and the backroads of Costa Rica -
Thailand Travels and Costa Rica travels.
I have rented a scooter a few of the times (start the giggles now), but I always thought, the freedom to ride a motorcycle must be amazing while I travel. Also, I just got done reading Neil Pert - Ghost Rider and it's inspired me to really learn how to ride now.
My problem is, I live most of the year in NJ, USA. The drivers in NJ are CRAZY (not that other drivers around the world would not be crazy and environmental conditions a little hairy). I do live near the Pine Barrens, so I could possible learn on backroads.
My question to this community is this, where does one start? What kind of bike? A dual cross bike? What size? Is there a decent inexpensive dual cross that is good to learn on?
Again, one of my goals this year is to ride a motorcycle from southern Vietnam to Hal Long Bay in the north . I know the cities would be hairy, unless I went around.
If this question has been asked a million times before then just ignore me and point me in the right direction. Thanks in advance!
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Old 03-01-2014, 03:43 PM   #2
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Old 03-01-2014, 05:06 PM   #3
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Start here.

http://www.renj.com/

After you take the course, you will have a better understanding of what you want.
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Old 03-02-2014, 01:08 AM   #4
Bill Harris
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Scope out what type of bike you will likely be riding overseas and buy one. Learn to work on it. Practice repairing flat tires by the road side. Practice packing your gear on it. But above all, ride. Ride. Ride. And ride.

Riding in NJ rush hour may ought to be excellent practice for riding in third-world countries.

Can't do it? Don't like it? Then this mode de transpo is not for you... :)

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Old 03-02-2014, 09:23 AM   #5
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If you want a new bike, I would strongly recommend one of the good 250 dual sports like a Honda CRF250L or Kawasaki KLX250.

I'm sure that you could learn a lot riding around the Pine Barrens (I've never been there, but I read a book about it). I would stay out of the high traffic areas.
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Old 03-02-2014, 09:50 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GPSeTravelguides View Post
OK, I am sure this has been answered before (I did search for new rider), but I wanted to learn how to ride a motorcycle so that I can ride when I travel. I have traveled to a lot of places around the world - Asia, Central and South America, Europe, Caribbean, Australia and a few other places - here are two of my galleries while I traveled Thailand and the backroads of Costa Rica -
Thailand Travels and Costa Rica travels.
I have rented a scooter a few of the times (start the giggles now), but I always thought, the freedom to ride a motorcycle must be amazing while I travel. Also, I just got done reading Neil Pert - Ghost Rider and it's inspired me to really learn how to ride now.
My problem is, I live most of the year in NJ, USA. The drivers in NJ are CRAZY (not that other drivers around the world would not be crazy and environmental conditions a little hairy). I do live near the Pine Barrens, so I could possible learn on backroads.
My question to this community is this, where does one start? What kind of bike? A dual cross bike? What size? Is there a decent inexpensive dual cross that is good to learn on?
Again, one of my goals this year is to ride a motorcycle from southern Vietnam to Hal Long Bay in the north . I know the cities would be hairy, unless I went around.
If this question has been asked a million times before then just ignore me and point me in the right direction. Thanks in advance!
I live in northern NJ and ridden in the dirt and on the roads for about 45 years. I have ridden dirt bikes in the Pine Barrens as well. The absolute best thing you can do is buy a used dirt bike and spend a few years riding in the Pine Barrens. Riding in that sand is difficult and low cost. In many places, falling is like landing on a bed.

The reason I say "used dirt bike" is that you will have to learn how to fix it because you will break down once or twice out in the middle of nowhere. Better to be skilled at fixing it before you go to a foreign country where a break down could get complicated and expensive in a hurry.

Learning on the paved back roads of NJ could be dangerous. The vast majority of drivers don't see you and do stupid things which can get you killed. Without the dirt training your chances of avoiding those wrecks diminishes.

If you decide to learn on the paved back roads of NJ, WEAVE when approaching an intersection where cars are trying to turn onto or off of the road you're on. Do the same if you are approaching someone who looks like they might be making a left turn across your path.

They won't see you if you don't weave.

Good luck and God speed.
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Old 03-02-2014, 03:22 PM   #7
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First read a book called Proficient motorcycling, then get a course and then get a V Strome ;)


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Old 03-02-2014, 06:16 PM   #8
r60man
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I agree with the poster above. If you live near the pine barrens you have the perfect place to learn to ride. The fire roads around the old Fort Dix are a great place to get out and go. I rode there a lot as a young man. We would trailer our bikes down from PA, just outside of Philly. I had some of the best riding days ever there.

Try to find a buddy to ride with. Two important reasons. 1. They can show you the ropes and riding behind a better rider you can pick up a lot of things which will help. 2. You do not want to be alone and have a problem with your bike or person and have no one with you. A buddy or two are really good to have.

Take a few years of building the off road skills and you will be ready for whatever the road can throw at you.

One time I was down there flying down a fire road and I power slide around turn and almost hit a tank! Somehow we had gotten onto the base! Of course Dix is closed now, but that sure was an interesting day.
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Old 03-02-2014, 07:14 PM   #9
bwalsh
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More options for the first thing you should do...even before you buy a bike.

http://nm.msf-usa.org/msf/ridercourses.aspx?state=NJ

If you're traveling around the world and expect to be on dirt roads, a dual sport bike is your best bet. Start out AWAY from rush hour traffic. Pine Barrens, back roads, etc.
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Old 03-02-2014, 10:34 PM   #10
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There is a lot of good info here:

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=563090
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:57 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by GPSeTravelguides View Post
My question to this community is this, where does one start? What kind of bike? A dual cross bike? What size? Is there a decent inexpensive dual cross that is good to learn on?
As no one's answered the above part of your question yet, a 250cc dual sport is a pretty good place to start. Cheap, simple, bullet proof, active forum, availability of parts, ...... a later model low mileage Yamaha XT225. If the budget will stretch then go for its replacement in 2008 the XT250
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Old 03-03-2014, 06:54 AM   #12
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I also vote a 250cc dual sport like the Kaw and Honda mentioned above. I'd even suggest a new one since they are relatively inexpensive. You have the Pine Barrens to learn the craft plus the 250 dual sports are street legal and can get you anywhere you want to go. The main thing is seat time. You can probably get pretty proficent in a season if you get enough seat time. My first year riding was 1971. Within months I entered my first competitive events, mostly enduro's. It's a fun way to learn what a motorcycle can do because in an enduro you don't really get to turn a round. Either you make the loop or the sweepers haul you in. But I digress... Go with a smallish dual sport. It won't be your last motorcycle.
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Old 03-03-2014, 07:23 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
As no one's answered the above part of your question yet, a 250cc dual sport is a pretty good place to start.
I'm pretty sure that somebody answer in post #5
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