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View Results: What phone has the best GPS?
iphone 20 19.05%
android 42 40.00%
windows 5 4.76%
Quit being so cheap and buy a gps 38 36.19%
Voters: 105. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-04-2013, 06:14 PM   #61
sarathmenon
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Originally Posted by SgtDuster View Post
I guess it's one of those cases where we'll have difference of opinions forever. This is my main and only reason for not wanting a do-it-all device:

1. Break/lost it and you lost everything.

One job, one tool. I'm this kind of guy. Even if I'm an IT tech.

You prefer a dedicated smartphone as your GPS? No problem with that. If you prefer the ergos, the software, if you find it more responsive, whatever.


I can lost/break my GPS. I won't be happy but it's not the end of my life. I mean, I can wait few weeks and take my time to read some reviews and wait for a deal to buy another. Same for a camera. But my phone? Everything at the same time?

Anyway, to each his own
A motorcycle GPS costs the same as a high end phone (roughly 600 bucks), so the cost of replacing a GPS is comparable with a phone. There are cheaper GPS units available, and there are cheaper phones as well.

For redundancy, I carry my old phone. I use a mount which has a chance of leaking water into it, worst case, if the phone goes bust, I swap out the older phone. It's the same micro usb charger, and fits in the same cradle and is less bulkier to pack than a GPS. That way, I have redundancy for my phone, music and GPS. It's somewhat important for longer trips where I need a spare, for shorter ones, I wouldn't bother at all.

I've also had my phone really wet a couple of times and it's held up very well. It is not IPX7 or anything, but from a layman point it works out well for me.
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Old 07-04-2013, 07:01 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by sarathmenon View Post
A motorcycle GPS costs the same as a high end phone (roughly 600 bucks), so the cost of replacing a GPS is comparable with a phone. There are cheaper GPS units available, and there are cheaper phones as well.
Disregard.

I'm am idiot.
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Old 07-04-2013, 07:48 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by revrandy View Post
You missed the point where Nokia doesn't require a data signal. Their built-in GPS can be set to satellite only. If you like it can also talk in one of many languages & dialects. My favourite is surfer dude.
Many smartphones have built-in GPS. You need data coverage for the map app to fill in roads and other information. Lots of apps allow you to download the areas you plan to go so you don't need to have coverage but most are clunky compared to GPS unit software where populating the information is easy peasy.

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Old 07-04-2013, 09:00 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by sarathmenon View Post
A motorcycle GPS costs the same as a high end phone (roughly 600 bucks), so the cost of replacing a GPS is comparable with a phone. There are cheaper GPS units available, and there are cheaper phones as well.
It's not only about cost (even if I'm not sure that you can compare a high end 600$ waterproof moto GPS with a not waterproof and not gloves friendly phone but I digress) but about losing everything at once.


Imagine that I'm on a 2 weeks trip and I lost/break my GPS. Not fun but I can live whitout it. I can plan my route (I always do anyway) and take notes , buy a map, ask for directions and so on.

But if I was using my phone for everything, I would have lost my music, my web browser for hotel/camping/restaurants reservations and seeking, my phone, my GPS, my camera...for the rest of my trip.


No, thanks




Another reason is as soon as you think that one function of your do-it-all device is kinda outdated, you have to change everything at once.
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Old 07-05-2013, 03:06 AM   #65
Jan from Finland
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Originally Posted by sarathmenon View Post
A motorcycle GPS costs the same as a high end phone (roughly 600 bucks), so the cost of replacing a GPS is comparable with a phone. There are cheaper GPS units available, and there are cheaper phones as well.
Another benefit of delicated GPS is that most high end navgators have transreflective screen. It's readable in direct sun light. Only very few special phones have it.
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Old 07-05-2013, 08:34 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
Many smartphones have built-in GPS. You need data coverage for the map app to fill in roads and other information. Lots of apps allow you to download the areas you plan to go so you don't need to have coverage but most are clunky compared to GPS unit software where populating the information is easy peasy.

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Again I repeat the Nokia built-in GPS DOES NOT NEED A DATA CONNECTION. I have used it and stand alone GPS units, not clunky at all.

Again for posterity sake, the Nokia built-in GPS DOES NOT NEED A DATA CONNECTION.
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Old 07-05-2013, 09:02 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by revrandy View Post
Again I repeat the Nokia built-in GPS DOES NOT NEED A DATA CONNECTION. I have used it and stand alone GPS units, not clunky at all.

Again for posterity sake, the Nokia built-in GPS DOES NOT NEED A DATA CONNECTION.
No need to shout. Nokia is a phone that has built-in GPS just like many other smartphones. Nothing special about that. Just like all other smartphones, it has an operating system that runs various applications such as email and mapping software.

If the mapping application on your Nokia can show roads and search for gas stations, restaurants, etc. while outside of cell coverage range it must come with a substantial base map package. That is a good deal better than most mapping applications such as Google Maps. What is the mapping application you use on your Nokia?

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Old 07-05-2013, 09:11 AM   #68
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My experience is limited to a first generation Motorola Android and an iPhone 4. Both had to have cell service to perform as GPS. At one critical point we lost the cell connection along with GPS with the Android.

Though the much greater problem was battery life of that phone. It would not charge and guide at the same time. This would eat up the battery in about 2 hours or less. As the phone aged this got worse.

And when I went to my provider for service, I was told....


You guessed it, "They all do that."

And since that old android was not being supported I got to watch as my apps fell out of date. That lead to the iPhone4.
THis works a little better. Voice directions via bluetooth when I use, Google Maps.
Which was one of the driving reasons for the Android.
Battery life is still an issue. Using just the GPS and cell and shutting down all other apps Strava will suck the battery dry in about 6 hours.
That is providing I don't use the phone for anything else.
That has led me to research handheld GPS / cycling computers and such.
So far the Garmin 810 is in the lead, though I'm not real fired up about dropping $500 for the kit and more for a power meter.
Numbers are fun, but I'm not looking that hard for fun.
I've tied it with MotionX GPS app for iPhone on the motorcycle and car and that can drain the battery pretty quickly as well.
The Garmin 810 is likely much more capable of living life on a bicycle/motorcycle or hiking than my iPhone. As far as I know iPhones don't like water.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:50 PM   #69
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I find my phone/GPS app infinitely easier to use than any GPS unit.
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Old 07-07-2013, 07:01 PM   #70
BillsburgGS
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[QUOTE=Mr Head;21796258]My experience is limited to a first generation Motorola Android and an iPhone 4. Both had to have cell service to perform as GPS. At one critical point we lost the cell connection along with GPS with the Android.

Though the much greater problem was battery life of that phone. It would not charge and guide at the same time. This would eat up the battery in about 2 hours or less. As the phone aged this got worse.

And when I went to my provider for service, I was told....


You guessed it, "They all do that."

And since that old android was not being supported I got to watch as my apps fell out of date. That lead to the iPhone4.
THis works a little better. Voice directions via bluetooth when I use, Google Maps.
Which was one of the driving reasons for the Android.
Battery life is still an issue. Using just the GPS and cell and shutting down all other apps Strava will suck the battery dry in about 6 hours.
That is providing I don't use the phone for anything else.


Interesting, my experience with iPhone was different (moved to a 5 a few months ago). Maybe the differences were due to carrier variances ( I am in VZW) or settings.

I used Navigon ($49?) which requires no cell service as the maps are downloaded to your phone on an iPhone 4 several times in places with no cell service and I have navigon/GPS-current running all day with my phone plugged in and stayed 100% charge all day. I get the same xperience on my iPhone 5 with Verizon now living a 1,000 miles away.

Who knows...all of the experiences with smartphones could be highly variable bassed on the apps on our phones, our carriers's own version, our own personally selected settings. Hard stuff to figure out on a forum.
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Old 07-10-2013, 04:09 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
No need to shout. Nokia is a phone that has built-in GPS just like many other smartphones. Nothing special about that. Just like all other smartphones, it has an operating system that runs various applications such as email and mapping software.

If the mapping application on your Nokia can show roads and search for gas stations, restaurants, etc. while outside of cell coverage range it must come with a substantial base map package. That is a good deal better than most mapping applications such as Google Maps. What is the mapping application you use on your Nokia?

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
http://here.com/download

Nokia comes shipped with their own navigation software. This software is pretty good, too.

Then you can download maps for the whole world (with more or less detailed coverage) for free. It is about 7.5 GB I believe for the world. That is very special and unique amongst smartphones.

Nokia owns Navteq, which means their maps are amongst the best.

So no need for data coverage to navigate with a Nokia phone. That is the reason I still use my old Symbian phone.
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