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Old 06-19-2013, 06:51 AM   #1
More_Miles OP
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Karcoma - Improved hose connector?

Hey all!

First off, I stuck this on the flea market thread. Then I thought it would be better off as a thread all on it's own.

I managed, in a typical ham fisted way, to break one of my hose connectors for the Karcoma petcocks on my '83 R100RT. I know this part is available from the dealer and CHEAP. That's the problem. It's plastic. I see from my perusing of the various parts sites that the hose connector for the Germa petcocks is metal, probably aluminium. If I had, or had access to a lathe, I could probably churn out a replacement for the below that would survive idiots like me. That and survive the eventual demise of manufacturer parts availability. Since I don't, does anyone out there do this? I'd rather support the community if possible.

Image shamelessly stolen.

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Old 06-19-2013, 07:28 AM   #2
Bill Harris
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The connector is plastic and it does break. Buy several spares so your supply will last a lifetime. One thing I do is to put a faint wipe of silicone grease on the hose barb before you push the hose on-- it makes removing the hose later on much easier.

Another thing I've done is to change over to the right-angle style petcock. Pulling the hose back is easier than pulling in down and the rear-facing hose barbs are less prone to damage and contamination than the downward-facing ones when the tank is removed and set down on the ground. The tiny in-petcock fuel strainer, with it's attendant fiber sealing rings and the potential for an extra leakage point, never has impressed me as practical. I'd rather use the in-tank filter socks and disposable inline fuel filters.

My 2c.

My plumbing:



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Old 06-19-2013, 07:56 AM   #3
Stan_R80/7
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My original Karcoma petcocks have plastic hose connectors which are still good. I replaced the petcocks, but not because of the hose connector. The BMW cloth covered fuel hose fits correctly and with a twisting downward pull motion can be removed by hand (I wear gloves when doing this). I think you need to work on your technique and order some spares. Good luck!

Stan_R80/7 screwed with this post 06-19-2013 at 08:08 AM Reason: clarification
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Old 06-19-2013, 09:35 AM   #4
disston
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Like most of the rubber and plastic parts on our bikes I think the modern plastic petcock barb is a faster deteriorating brand of plastic than the originals. I hang onto as much of the old stuff as I can just because it will out last a new replacement most times. Same theory applies to foot peg rubbers, cable covers on the handlebars, you name it.

I don't like to use Armour All because it leaves a too slick finish but it may in fact prolong the life of plastic and rubber. I do use another product called "Back to Black" and contrary to implications of it's name it helps prolong the life of plastic and rubber of any color.

I need to spend a couple of days washing and waxing my bi.......Nah. Never have enough time it seems.
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:39 AM   #5
More_Miles OP
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Spares ordered. I might, when I someday get flush and sufficiently motivated, order up a set of the "new and improved" petcocks. I still think that this would be a good place a an aluminium connector, even if it uses a replaceable, off the shelf o-ring to seal.

As for the silicone grease tip, thanks. I do this when re-installing the fuel lines, and it's always easy. I don't know why though it's always so damned hard to remove mine. And I am using the BMW cloth clad line, in it's proper size too. As for grip, twist and pull, between the choke and throttle cable and my own inability to get at tight places, it's difficult.
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:59 AM   #6
Bill Harris
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To help with pulling the lines off, slip a flat washer onto the hose barb before pushing the hose on. A 1/4" ID washer might fit the 7mm fitting, a 5/16" definitely will. Get fancy, go stainless. The washer will give something more substantial to pull against when removing the hose.

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Old 06-19-2013, 10:59 AM   #7
ed mocz
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I've used brass hose barbs from the hardware store. Think I used a hacksaw and file to make them fit.
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Old 06-19-2013, 01:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by More_Miles View Post
Hey all!

First off, I stuck this on the flea market thread. Then I thought it would be better off as a thread all on it's own.

I managed, in a typical ham fisted way, to break one of my hose connectors for the Karcoma petcocks on my '83 R100RT. I know this part is available from the dealer and CHEAP. That's the problem. It's plastic. I see from my perusing of the various parts sites that the hose connector for the Germa petcocks is metal, probably aluminium. If I had, or had access to a lathe, I could probably churn out a replacement for the below that would survive idiots like me. That and survive the eventual demise of manufacturer parts availability. Since I don't, does anyone out there do this? I'd rather support the community if possible.

Image shamelessly stolen.
Until you learn not to be ham fisted, you want them to break. Put something stronger in there and you will just break something a lot more expensive.

The lube and washer routine works very well. When you pull on the line, it elongates and the ID gets smaller, gripping the nipple. So never pull on them. You want to push on them. This causes them to "bunch up" and the ID gets bigger, and slips off. This is why the washer routine works. You pull on the washer which in turn pushes on the fuel line.

You can get a tool to do the same thing. It looks like a pair of pliers with U cup spreader jaws.

You can also remove the line at your filter rather than at the petcock (for routine tank removal). Then you only have to hassle with it when replacing lines.

I have an elaborate fuel system with 6 nipples, 4 Ts and 2 filters. I'm looking for one of those tools, too many places where there isn't clearance for a washer.
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Old 06-20-2013, 01:42 AM   #9
_cy_
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Lisle Hose Remover Plier .. blue point makes one too. had mine forever. comes in real handy breaking lose stuck fuel line hoses

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Old 06-20-2013, 05:56 AM   #10
Darryl's bmw
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cloth covered fuel line

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
The connector is plastic and it does break. Buy several spares so your supply will last a lifetime. One thing I do is to put a faint wipe of silicone grease on the hose barb before you push the hose on-- it makes removing the hose later on much easier.

Another thing I've done is to change over to the right-angle style petcock. Pulling the hose back is easier than pulling in down and the rear-facing hose barbs are less prone to damage and contamination than the downward-facing ones when the tank is removed and set down on the ground. The tiny in-petcock fuel strainer, with it's attendant fiber sealing rings and the potential for an extra leakage point, never has impressed me as practical. I'd rather use the in-tank filter socks and disposable inline fuel filters.

Bill;
How did you keep your cloth covered fuel line from fraying?

My 2c.

My plumbing:



--Bill
Bill;
How did you keep your cloth covered fuel line from fraying?
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Old 06-20-2013, 08:54 PM   #11
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I have a lathe (actually 3 lathes) but I will buy you a new plastic one, if you want. Hell, I'll buy you two. Final offer.
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Old 06-20-2013, 09:15 PM   #12
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I think there is an easier way to deal with the situation than washers, special pliers, pushing them off versus pulling them off, and silicon which I would think might let them come off as easily as they went on? I do none of all that and have absolutely no trouble getting the line on or off. I have mentioned it many times before but is seems no posters so far does it. I swell the line up with gasoline. Dip them in a little before you put them on. Splash a little on before you pull them off. They go right on, dry and stick real tight. Splash some gas on them before taking them off and they slip right off. It's as easy as that. Doing that thusly is really one of the best things about German woven line.

supershaft screwed with this post 06-20-2013 at 11:27 PM
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Old 06-20-2013, 09:48 PM   #13
Bill Harris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl's bmw View Post
Bill;
How did you keep your cloth covered fuel line from fraying?
That is new fuel hose; otherwise, it's a patina... ;)

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Old 06-20-2013, 10:00 PM   #14
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl's bmw View Post
Bill;
How did you keep your cloth covered fuel line from fraying?
Thread on this recently w/ numerous ideas. I likes the super glue one. Personally I don't use the stuff anymore.
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Old 06-20-2013, 10:03 PM   #15
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I was looking at mine today as I am doing some ordeing of AN fittings for my project.

I did some chipherin and it looks like if a person were to remove the threaded area where the "Plastic POS barb fitting" retaining nut screws on there would be enough meat in the hex area to tap for either 1/4 NPT or an M12x1.5 Weber banjo.

I will probably do the 1/4 NPT myself as I plan to use -4 hose for the fuel system and all of the 12X1.5 ends I have found are only for -6 hose.
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