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Old 07-03-2014, 10:34 PM   #1
craigincali OP
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Suits: whats the deal?

What are the advantages of wearing a riding suit verses a jacket and pant? Are 2 piece suits better? pro / cons? The idea of a one piece seems convenient but is it practical?

I have 2 jackets and pants combos (1 for street and 1 for off road). I would be wearing the suit to and from work a I commute everyday and wear a uniform at work. I feel like the jacket I wear in the morning so too hot to wear home even with vents open and the pants are also too hot on the way home. I live in SoCal and my morning commute is usually 30 degrees cooler than my evening commute. I don't know if a well vented suit would be the answer. Is there a well vented and water resistant suit out there? Is it too much to ask for a suit that can be worn from 40-100 degrees and be comfortable?

I know Areostich and Olympia. Are there others worth considering?
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Old 07-04-2014, 01:12 AM   #2
JR356
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I'm in Central CA.

One piece suit is quick on/off,but most don't vent well enough for CA commute.

The Olympia transitions gear has been the best setup for me.
I have the GT Air and the Xmoto jackets,Xmoto pants,also have the Airglide 3 pants.Olympia has newer versions with different names now,but still labeled under the transitions category,last I looked.

Rarely have need for rain gear just for the commute,except in winter.

For 3 seasons just close up the vents/panels in the am and open in the afternoon.

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Old 07-05-2014, 07:23 PM   #3
TebKLR
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1pc vs 2 pc

I find that a 1 pc is fine for street use (Aerostich Light or Roadcrafter) but that my Aero Light Darien gear allows greater ease of movement and "body language" off-road
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Old 07-05-2014, 07:31 PM   #4
craigincali OP
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I'm just talking about using it for commuting everyday
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Old 07-06-2014, 01:32 PM   #5
MillCreek
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I have a number of different one-piece suits: Teiz Lombard, Olympia Phantom, Olympia Stealth and Scorpion Passport. I use them as a commuter over a business suit. Up here in the Seattle area, my main concern is water-resistance and warmth. When it gets warm, the only suit that is comfortable is the Olympia Stealth, a mesh suit. With the rest of them, in my typical stop-and-go traffic commute, I just cook if the temperature is over 75 degrees, no matter how many vents I have open.

Of all of them, I think the Olympia suits are the best made. A word of caution though on suit sizes: depending on how many clothes you wear underneath, or if you contemplate using the suit liner in cool weather, you probably want to buy the suit one or two sizes larger to accommodate. I am 5'10", 200 lbs, 16x33 dress shirt and 36x30 dress slacks with a smartphone on the belt, and for the suits I wear in the rain and winter with the suit liner, I have to buy XXL for them to successfully fit, even though the size charts say I should buy a large or XL. My mesh suit is XL and it fits well over my business clothes.
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Old 07-08-2014, 04:59 PM   #6
EddyQ
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1) Suits are easy on/off.
2) Wearing a suit, your top and bottom are connected. Sure, you can do this with separates but nowhere near as easily. Connected=safer
3) If you are the type that is tempted to ditch the pants on a short ride, maybe a suit is for you.

I have a Roadcrafter, which is warm over 75 as others say. But when temps hit 85, you are hot regardless when you have stops (unless you have cooling gear).

Consider Motoport gear as well. They have the most rugged mesh gear out there.
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Old 07-09-2014, 02:02 PM   #7
thetable
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddyQ View Post
1) Suits are easy on/off.
2) Wearing a suit, your top and bottom are connected. Sure, you can do this with separates but nowhere near as easily. Connected=safer
3) If you are the type that is tempted to ditch the pants on a short ride, maybe a suit is for you.

I have a Roadcrafter, which is warm over 75 as others say. But when temps hit 85, you are hot regardless when you have stops (unless you have cooling gear).
This!
Nothing goes on and off as fast as a 1pc Roadcrafter. I've had the Olympia, it was a bit of an act to get into, the pads were tiny and poorly placed, and the venting was pretty horrible.
The 1 piece nature means that the top can't ride up exposing flesh to the ground.

I've been in my RC from single digit to triple digit temperatures and everything in between. It's hot in the summer, it's cold in the winter, but damn, it's kept my squishy bits off the ground on more than one occasion.

I've gone to the Transit for touring duty, but for the daily commute, my RC is still my go to.
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Old 07-09-2014, 02:37 PM   #8
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I also have a roadcrafter and like it a lot for commuting to work. Very easy to put on and off and I just secure it on my motorcycle. Gets too hot though with temps above 90 in NorCal. At least the humidity is low. Not sure how it will do in humid weather.


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Old 07-09-2014, 03:56 PM   #9
StuartV
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You're in SoCal? Go visit Motoport in person!

I have a 1-pc Roadcrafter and a 2-pc Motoport suit. I wear the MP about 90% of the time, including commuting.
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Old 07-09-2014, 04:11 PM   #10
craigincali OP
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I did. Very nice stuff but too much $$ for my blood.
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Old 07-10-2014, 07:03 AM   #11
StuartV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigincali View Post
I did. Very nice stuff but too much $$ for my blood.
$500 for a jacket? You can definitely spend $150 to 200. But, if you're looking at Aerostich, it's about the same as Motoport. And, how many times do you want to buy a $150 jacket?

It seems like a lot of people buy their gear on the basis that they *might* crash, but probably won't. I buy my gear with the question in mind "is this what I want to be wearing when I crash?" And that is WHEN, not if.

In my opinion/experience, there is gear that is comfortable when it's hot, and then there is gear that I'd want to be wearing when I crash. And the Motoport Mesh Kevlar gear is the ONLY gear I've found that fits into both categories. Heavily perforated leather is too hot. Aerostich gear is too hot. And all the other textile gear that is mesh or otherwise highly ventilated is barely worth the trouble to put it on, for as little real protection as it gives. I'd almost ride rather without it at all, just to force myself to ride as if I'm completely unprotected. Not only do the materials of those other mesh textiles provide very little actual protection, they pretty much all have crappy armor and the cut of the garment makes it pretty unlikely that the armor will stay in place when you're flying through the air, and be in the right spot when you land/impact.

I don't skimp on my gear, my saddle, or my tires. But, that's just me.
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Old 07-10-2014, 07:13 AM   #12
StuartV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigincali View Post
What are the advantages of wearing a riding suit verses a jacket and pant? Are 2 piece suits better? pro / cons? The idea of a one piece seems convenient but is it practical?
Oh, and on this, the 1 piece Roadcrafter is obviously the most convenient to put on and take off. But, a 2 piece Roadcrafter or Motoport or other suit that has pants that go on like the Roadcrafter pants, takes only SLIGHTLY longer to put on (I had a 2 piece Roadcrafter before I got my 1 piece). And, the convenience of the 2 piece really shows when you want to, say, run out to lunch and just throw on the jacket. Or you stop somewhere with the full suit on and you just want to take the jacket off while you're stopped.

I didn't like my 2 piece Roadcrafter because the jacket was too long for my tastes. On the bike, the extra length just bunches up in the crotch area. I definitely prefer a waist length jacket, like you'd see as part of any 2 piece leather suit (except the Aerostich Transit suit, which has a longer jacket - which is why I didn't buy one when they came out). Thus, when I got my Motoport suit, I got the Air Mesh Kevlar jacket, instead of the Marathon or Ultra II, that a lot of ADV guys seem to get.

I definitely like the way the suit fits and looks with the waist-length jacket, versus the longer jacket. I got the mesh Kevlar jeans, which you would NOT want for commuting. But, MP makes an overpant that goes on and off just like the Aerostich Roadcrafter 2-piece suit pants. I actually want to get some of those for myself, for commuting. As it is, I have been commuting with just jeans and no protection for my legs.

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Old 07-10-2014, 07:58 AM   #13
craigincali OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartV View Post
$500 for a jacket? You can definitely spend $150 to 200. But, if you're looking at Aerostich, it's about the same as Motoport. And, how many times do you want to buy a $150 jacket?

It seems like a lot of people buy their gear on the basis that they *might* crash, but probably won't. I buy my gear with the question in mind "is this what I want to be wearing when I crash?" And that is WHEN, not if.

In my opinion/experience, there is gear that is comfortable when it's hot, and then there is gear that I'd want to be wearing when I crash. And the Motoport Mesh Kevlar gear is the ONLY gear I've found that fits into both categories. Heavily perforated leather is too hot. Aerostich gear is too hot. And all the other textile gear that is mesh or otherwise highly ventilated is barely worth the trouble to put it on, for as little real protection as it gives. I'd almost ride rather without it at all, just to force myself to ride as if I'm completely unprotected. Not only do the materials of those other mesh textiles provide very little actual protection, they pretty much all have crappy armor and the cut of the garment makes it pretty unlikely that the armor will stay in place when you're flying through the air, and be in the right spot when you land/impact.

I don't skimp on my gear, my saddle, or my tires. But, that's just me.
I don't skimp on my gear either, I am just not willing to pay those prices for a suit. My coworkers make fun of me because I wear my pants, jacket and boots in 100 degree weather and they leave in a tshirt and jeans.
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:03 AM   #14
TonyKZ1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigincali View Post
I don't skimp on my gear either, I am just not willing to pay those prices for a suit. My coworkers make fun of me because I wear my pants, jacket and boots in 100 degree weather and they leave in a tshirt and jeans.
Yea, I get the same comments the same since I have always worn my gear, Fieldsheer Highland II one piece suit or Firstgear Kilimanjaro Air jacket HT over pants along with leather gloves and boots, regardless of the weather. While they complain of the weather being too hot for their mesh gear if they even wear it that is, or too cold, or too rainy, or too?? I guess it's too easy to just drive their trucks, cars, with it's cold A/C or just wear no gear.
I dunno?
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:52 AM   #15
StuartV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigincali View Post
I don't skimp on my gear either, I am just not willing to pay those prices for a suit. My coworkers make fun of me because I wear my pants, jacket and boots in 100 degree weather and they leave in a tshirt and jeans.
I don't mean to give offense here. But, if you think the gear is better (and by "better", I'm really talking about the level of protection it provides), and you're just not willing to pay that much, then that is pretty much the definition of skimping.

If you don't think the gear is better than the stuff you get for $200 or whatever it is that you are willing to pay, then, okay. That's not skimping, that's just spending your money wisely.

However, if you don't think the Motoport Mesh Kevlar is better than any leather jacket you can get for $200 or better (protection, mind you) than any other textile gear, then I'd really have to ask what research you've done that leads you to that conclusion. Because the research I've done leads me to believe that it's way (WAY, WAY!) better protection than any other textile gear and even way better than leather (especially cheap leather), for street use. I would still wear my 1 piece leathers when I'm on a racetrack.
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