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Old 04-28-2015, 11:13 AM   #1
Dkizerian OP
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Joined: Dec 2013
Location: Tooele, Utah
Oddometer: 180
To part out and start over?

Hi, just looking for opinions, or guidance.

last fall I bought an inexpensive, non-running r100rt. I got it running, but many things have proved to be wrong...
  • Engine is garbage. looks like it was run very low on oil, one of the con-rods looks severely overheated, crank doesn't look salvageable, and both cylinders will need to be replaced.
  • Heads don't look good, but might be serviceable for the short term
  • Every time I have worked on it I've found more evidence of some previous owner being an idiot mechanically. Stripped threads, non-metric bolts cross-threaded till they work, plumbing pipe plugs replacing drain plugs in the drivetrain.
  • Trans had water in it.
It just never seems to end with this bike.



At this point I am in over my head on the project, and I'm not sure the direction to go.
  1. Have someone build me a fresh engine with good heads. get bike back together, and ride it till the next parts break - I know the trans will happen eventually because of the water - I expect the rear drive will be a problem too, just based on what looks like constantly poor maintenance.
  2. Strip this one down for parts, and find a different, running, maintained bike. I'd keep duplicates of any of the parts I want to modify to make this bike mine, so it can always be returned to stock. Try to sell/distribute parts I won't use to help offset the first mistake and maybe help with airheadKarma along the way too...
I know what direction I want to go, but I'm looking for input or ideas that I maybe haven't considered.



Thanks
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Old 04-28-2015, 11:26 AM   #2
disston
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I bought a non-runner some years ago. Tried to get it running but gave up. Some of the parts,transmission, are on my bike now. Others are on friends bikes or waiting for a return to service. My project was not as bad as yours sounds. I think that some of these old bikes have to go to parts. Some can be returned to service. It's a personal choice. Getting this bike running will cost more money and then when you are done it is a non-matching numbers bike. It may be a non-standard vintage bike. Alls good but it will cost more and be worth less. Part it out and try to find something that you can find more inspirational.

Keep the title with the frame. Strip down the engine. Throw the crank away or turn it into yard art. A spare set of heads are nice if these match what you have running now. A spare transmission is almost a must. You'll be surprised in the number of nuts and bolts that will come in handy and electrical bits and pieces.
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Old 04-28-2015, 11:43 AM   #3
dap spackled
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I bought a basket case 5 years ago. Only in the past two years did I start to build something. My goal is to re-build, never restore. Restoring old bikes is just not my thing. However, many parts contributed to the Cafe Build I just finished. The important point is how much you paid to start with. My barn find was only $500. The frame and engine case was worth that.
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Old 04-28-2015, 12:40 PM   #4
Mark Manley
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I have given up on an R100 I bought cheap that needed more work than I first thought and stripped it for spares without regret and with profit. If it was something like an R90S or R80G/S I would say rebuild it but an R100RT with that many problems I would strip and sell keeping any parts that might prove useful on your next airhead.
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Old 04-28-2015, 01:06 PM   #5
drhach
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Rebuilding a basketcase is very challenging; especially if it's your only bike. It's hard to say what is right. If you're stubborn, you'll probably do it whether it's right or not ( I know a guy like that ). One thing I can say is that rebuilding it means that you have a known quantity. You can check everything and ask tons of questions when you're not sure. You also can spend your life savings and probably will still be forced to pick things that you're going to cheap out on. In the end, if you're not up to it, you're not up to it. No biggie.

I've done a few. It's part of the fun for me. Not everyone feels that way.
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Old 04-28-2015, 01:32 PM   #6
TelemarkSean
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I just went through almost the same thing with my R80 mono.

I bought the bike pretty cheap knowing the heads would soon need redoing. Some of the indicators didn't work like the neutral light and oil pressure (!!!) light. I replaced all the fluids, repaired the wiring, and rode it for a while before I pulled the heads. Turns out there was some lubrication failure in its history (wrong oil? No oil pressure?). It still ran surprisingly well but almost everything in the motor needed replacing or major machining. Cam was toast. Lifters were worse than any I've seen on this site. Cylinder walls were scored as if someone had tried to hone them with a normal hone. Some of the valves were too worn to take a re-grind. Etc etc.

I was pretty bummed. I decided to check the transmission and final drive and if they were ok, I'd get a new motor. Since "only" my motor ended up being sick, I bought a freshly rebuilt motor for a little less than what I paid for the bike in the first place.

My cheap bike is now a $5000-6000 bike. Probably not worth it but I'm unreasonably attached to it. Restorations are labors of love and not of profit, I guess.

If my trans had been shot, I would have parted everything out, though.

I'll make a post about it sometime... maybe when I decide which parts of the old motor to sell.
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Old 04-28-2015, 07:28 PM   #7
Pokie
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Its up to you what you do with the bike but for the amount I can afford, I usually end up with a bike like yours. It can some times take years to get my bikes to a ride able condition but I rarely give up on them. Check out sites like IBMWR Marketplace and Roland Robitaille's used parts. I bet you could get it up and running in no time. Don't forget to check out what Fred has to offer, I bet he can help out as well. Check out his thread at http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1048985
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Old 04-29-2015, 03:09 AM   #8
Bill Harris
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Sometimes you buy a good, running bike, and later on get a deal on a parts bike. Sometimes you get to do that in reverse. Look for a good running bike. That matching frame and c'case is valuable.

Quote:
Roland Robitaille's used parts
Interesting. No website as such, but he does have photos and prices at a photo hosting site: http://www.fototime.com/memberalbum/...0FCB1F64350EBB

Looks like he parts out everything but the squeal on these bikes. A packrat after me own 'eart...

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Bill Harris screwed with this post 04-29-2015 at 07:39 AM
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Old 04-29-2015, 06:06 AM   #9
Pokie
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Sorry, I've never done a search for Roland's site, I got it from the IBMWR Marketplace site. Thanks for the clarification Bill.
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Old 04-29-2015, 07:34 AM   #10
Bill Harris
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I've never heard of it, but was curious and checked it out. A quick check doesn't show complaints, so I guess the guy is legit.

It's great to have many sources for old parts in these stormy waters.

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Old 04-29-2015, 10:32 PM   #11
Dkizerian OP
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Joined: Dec 2013
Location: Tooele, Utah
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thanks gang, still not sure what to do. I'm going to spend some time over the weekend wrenching on the bike again, and seeing how I feel...

Wife did give me her blessing on either direction, so that didn't help decide...
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Old 04-29-2015, 10:51 PM   #12
mach1mustang351
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Parts bikes become dead bikes that are gone forever.... but they also help revive other bikes that remain on the road. Kind of a circle of life thing. It was mentioned before but sometimes these cheap long term projects are the ones we can afford. It is often hard to save up money to buy a complete "done" bike. There are some advantages to buying a cheap bike and using your monthly parts bill as your payment plan.

On these old bikes there is something to being all though them. I wouldn't feel comfortable riding an old bike of unknown origin unless I had touched, serviced and updated nearly everything before putting it into service. Not helpful I know. It is scary when someone else with bad hands had been in there before you.
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Old 04-30-2015, 04:51 AM   #13
spo123
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Cool2

Roland is the real deal....He lives up near Lake Ossippee, in New Hampshire.
I have made purchases from him.
Very satisfied with his parts....picked up live....I never had him ship anything.
FYI
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