ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-02-2013, 08:09 AM   #16
Benesesso
Beastly Adventurer
 
Benesesso's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: West of Phoenix, Arizona
Oddometer: 9,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironwood View Post
you can get more for your money and a better machine as well if you avoid bridgeport. Like most of the comments here, they are held in high regard by lots of people looking for a home shop. Good versatile machine, but you will pay a lot for them. And the r-8 tooling is not the best system out there. Lots of cheap tooling available though and fine for a home shop.

I just came home with a tree 2uvr. Same footprint as a bp but 25% heavier and more standard features. Built in table x-axis drive and spindle drive standard as well. It uses the z collet with a unique locking mechanism that doesn't use a drawbar. I can change tools in 10 seconds or less. Fully tooled including a rotary phase converter it was well under $2k. And i mean fully tooled.

Another great machine to look for is a wells-index. A wonderful us made machine that is still supported by the manufacturer. Gorton, cincinnati, burke millrite (also sold under the powermatic brand), clausing 8520, lagun and a few others were candidates in my search.

For a lathe i found a maximat super 11 from austria. A beautiful piece of equipment that was not much money. $1650 with tooling.

I am new to machining metal as well but have a fabrication and woodworking background. Good luck with your search. Joe
+1

3,000lb. Gorton Mastermil fan here. Didn't mention it before because it sounded too big for the OP. Got mine in very nice shape for $500 on eBone. The 3 phase scares most home shop guys away. Mine has the NMTB 40 spindle, so I bought some TG100 collets (TG stands for "tremendous grip"). They do NOT slip! Then I built a very quiet rotary phase converter using a 5hp low speed (1140) 6 pole Baldor motor, brand new on eBone. Cheap, again because it's 3 phase. I almost bought a ready made phase converter until I saw how most manufacturers cut the end of the shaft off (for safety-right).

They cut them so the motors can't be used as motors after their converter electrics give up, plus they usually use cheapo 2 pole 3450 RPM motors that can be loud-bastards. Instead I bought a bunch of good 440v capacitors on sale at Graingers (I don't use the cheap 370v crap) and was able to get nearly equal voltage on each leg, while the mill was running. It was a good experience, didn't cost me much, and I have
a very heavy duty mill where rigidity is what counts!

BTW, a few years ago I picked up a local BRAND NEW 10 hp 3 phase Baldor 4 pole motor for $40. The nameplate said it was a 50 HZ motor at ~1415 rpm. Guy wanted some cash, so I hemmed and hawed, told him it probably wouldn't sell for much here because we have 60 HZ. He wanted $100, then $75, said $50 as low as he'd go. Right. I said no way, here's $40, and we loaded in my van! A man has got to know his motors!

Hard-working illegals cleaning it up. You GO, Obamer!




The 5hp power supply motor for the mill.


Capacitor box-OSHA approved!



__________________
US out of the UN, UN out of the US.

Benesesso screwed with this post 07-03-2013 at 09:40 PM
Benesesso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2013, 09:23 AM   #17
Ironwood
Friday Harbor, WA
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Oddometer: 737
Very nice mill. It is odd how everyone knows about Bridgeport but few people know about the real heavyweights out there. It really does make a big difference when it come to getting a good finished product.

But the BP's will get the job done with lighter cuts. I don't want to sound like a heavy iron snob. And they are a lot easier to move as well.

Ironwood screwed with this post 07-03-2013 at 09:47 AM
Ironwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2013, 06:40 PM   #18
Daryl_Stamp
Studly Adventurer
 
Daryl_Stamp's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: FL NY
Oddometer: 773
Bridgeports are great, but not the only option for a home shop garage mill. I love my J-head with a round ram, would prefer a dovetailed ram but have had this one for 18 years and use it routinely in the basement workshop. About $110 for an MSC static phase converter kit back then, my YCM CNC mill is running on a rotary unit I made from an old motor I had and a converter box from a guy in Cali.

A new import might be nicer than a beat up B-port, and a nice antique B-port might be better than any out of the box import, just depends on what you find and how long you're willing to wait. Tooling included with a machine can be a really big deal, Collets, vises, end-mills etc. can make a machine pretty valuable. Craigslist might be your friend here.

For lathes, skip the smaller stuff if you can; I've got a 10" Atlas that's rarely used by me as I've been spoiled by the 14" LeBlond that we have at work.
__________________
Live while you're alive.
Daryl_Stamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2013, 06:54 PM   #19
davesupreme
grand poobah
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: palm harbor, fla
Oddometer: 1,459
whatever mill you get, hold out for one w/a digital readout... maybe some old school guys can read the wheels, but i ain't gonna try it.... the acme screws on the tables are usually clapped out, and it don't matter at all w/a DRO....

whatever you get, remember that 'the machinist makes the cut'.....
davesupreme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2013, 06:49 PM   #20
Dagofast
Full giggety ahead.
 
Dagofast's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Arizona
Oddometer: 1,723
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailah View Post
I'm guessing if he doesn't want to throw down the cash for a Bport a Mori is a little overkill. But wow is that a nice lathe I checked them out and the prices, about $8500 was what I saw as normal.
That's the prices commanded on the really old ones (1970's) that sold new for $5500. A friend that owns the Mori dealership I used to work for in the 80's told me about 10 years ago at IMTS that he had a good customer that wanted 3 brand new Mori engine lathes. Mori had not offered manual lathes for years and really didn't want to build them anymore so they quoted them out at almost 50k each for MS1250's with a minimum build of 4. If my memory serves, his customer took 2, he sold one to another big Mori CNC user and he bought one to sell later. I think he did the same thing with Shizouka when they were phasing out manual mills. Those were very nice mills!

Whacheon and Webb copies of the Mori were much cheaper to buy.
Dagofast is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2013, 08:20 PM   #21
LuciferMutt
Rides slow bike slow
 
LuciferMutt's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: New(er) Mexico
Oddometer: 11,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironwood View Post
You can get more for your money and a better machine as well if you avoid Bridgeport. Like most of the comments here, they are held in high regard by lots of people looking for a home shop. Good versatile machine, but you will pay a lot for them. And the R-8 tooling is not the best system out there. Lots of cheap tooling available though and fine for a home shop.

I just came home with a Tree 2UVR. Same footprint as a BP but 25% heavier and more standard features. Built in table x-axis drive and spindle drive standard as well. It uses the Z collet with a unique locking mechanism that doesn't use a drawbar. I can change tools in 10 seconds or less. Fully tooled including a rotary phase converter it was well under $2k. And I mean fully tooled.

Another great machine to look for is a Wells-Index. A wonderful US made machine that is still supported by the manufacturer. Gorton, Cincinnati, Burke Millrite (also sold under the Powermatic brand), Clausing 8520, Lagun and a few others were candidates in my search.

For a lathe I found a Maximat Super 11 from Austria. A beautiful piece of equipment that was not much money. $1650 with tooling.

I am new to machining metal as well but have a fabrication and woodworking background. Good luck with your search. Joe
Agreed. I work on Bridgeports daily, and they are nice, but so are plenty of other machines. If you can't afford one, don't feel too bad. Most of them have a LOT of miles on them now...
__________________
You couldn't hear a dump truck driving through a nitro glycerin plant!

Badasses might screw with another badass. Nobody screws with a nut job. -- Plaka
LuciferMutt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2013, 12:32 AM   #22
peterman
cop magnet
 
peterman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Springfield,,,,like the Simpsons,,,orygun
Oddometer: 13,332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagofast View Post
That's the prices commanded on the really old ones (1970's)
I run machines from the 30's to make a living,,whatchoo talking,,old?
I have an old Walcott lathe that is older than all of us, bronze bushed headstock spindle!
I converted from flat belt by grooving the pulleys for a tri-band belt,,it has done more work than any of us can imagine,,and I have used it almost daily for 13 years. OLD?
scoff smiley here!

But then,,I'm old,, I still know how to pour babbit bearings,,so,,YMMV!
Oh,,and uh,,DRO's are for folks who can't do math.
forget the manual machines with dro,,just get a cnc,,you'll never be a real machinist anyway.,,Ooops,, I think I might have moved yer indicator,,hope you can find zero again,,way in there 3" deep in that inside thread,,
Bridgeport is a good machine, wiggle the table side to front, and lift and rock up and down as well. run the table all the way to the limit in both directions and watch for play or any slack. If you crank it all the way to one end and it drops a quarter inch,,,,,also try to see if the gibs have been adjusted to the max and may need replacement. The knee on the column does not usually suffer much wear, but look at the placement of the gibs on that axis too. Dust is not a deal breaker, but dust leads to rust, and precision relies in the ways. They should be sharp and clean and oiled!
good luck in yer search!
__________________
peterman
___________________________
"Your God, your rules,,YOU go burn in hell!" LLV
peterman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2013, 12:20 PM   #23
Dagofast
Full giggety ahead.
 
Dagofast's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Arizona
Oddometer: 1,723
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterman View Post
I run machines from the 30's to make a living,,whatchoo talking,,old?
"Old" is a relative term. Importation of Mori Seiki machines didn't begin in the USA until the 1970's, so..old relative to the brand.

We owned and ran a 1916 LeBlonde lathe with babbitt bearings in the early 80's. It had the little brass & glass oilers, leather drive belts that used to be ceiling fed but we converted to rear fed from an AC motor. We used it to make our own hobby parts for race cars and motorcycles. Then we started a job shop with it and could make lower tolerance parts on it, but not very profitably. We sold it to another hobby guy and bought a new lathe within 3-4 months. Night and day difference with accuracy and finishes, but that old beast could move more metal in a single pass!
Dagofast is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2013, 12:42 PM   #24
ohgood
Beastly Adventurer
 
ohgood's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: alabama
Oddometer: 2,495
lots of foreskin (oops, foremen) are really impressed by eighth pound blued chunks of metal dropping off, but don't understand "why do you make ground finishes take so long? its just a taper!"

lol, I miss the metal but none of the stupid.
__________________
scrolling through the words to get to the pictures is cool, but i'm really just here for the tracks and waypoints... post some ok ?
ohgood is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014