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Old 07-08-2013, 01:21 PM   #46
Dudley
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July 7 :: And then I dropped the bike on my foot :: Burns Lake, BC

I underestimated how cold it would get at night. Generally, I prefer to be cold when sleeping, but this was pretty damn cold. I awoke a few times and readjusted the bag. Basically smothering myself.

At 30, my joints are starting to pain me. This is mostly in jest, however my knees and all the joints in my hands just ache. I'm hoping over the course of this trip, they get better. Initially, it was my ass that was in pain. But now, I stop because my hands are all knotted up. I feel like Clay Morrow from Sons of Anarchy. Minus the big ass jaw.

I was up earl'ish today to break down camp. Decided to hike Overland Falls and another wayside short hike. All in all, I probably got 1.5hrs of walking in. Which was a nice break. However, Alpinestar boots and BMW Rallye pants probably aren't the most ideal attire.

Along the way, on 16, I caught up to a BMW 800 that was all kitted out. Probably one of the first BMWs I 'd seen. We both stopped at a wayside for a break and took to chatting. Really nice guy, Paul, out of Chicago. He spotted the ADV sticker on my panniers and said he was also a member. Kinda cool to meet similar folks on the road. His bike is in the photo above with mine. He took the scenic route through MT, ID, etc and then up to Jasper. Thus avoiding the hell that was the plains. Seriously, I don't know what I was thinking. Unfortunately, his Nolan modular helmet took a shit on him, it would no longer open up. So he had to try to birth his head everytime he wanted to remove it. I guess that's the one good thing about standard helmets, one last thing to go wrong. He was off to Fairbanks and all over. Wife was meeting him and then they were going to do the Dalton. Makes me wish my wife wasn't in the process of finishing her thesis and boards so she could have met me in AK for a few days.

My goal destination was Prince George. But again, I was way ahead of schedule. I stopped at the tourist info and asked for advice on lunch, places to go after PG, etc. I'm amazed with how helpful all of these Tourist Info places in Canada are. They suggested Nancy O's. And the pulled pork sandwich. The place was fantastic. Given I was stopping to break for an hour, I grabbed a beer, Innis and Gunn, casked aged Scottish ale. Going to have to try this back home. Tastes like a great ale with a bit of rye whiskey.

I put my sights on Burns Lake. Google showed a campground there. Free fire wood, wifi, shower, etc. Come to find out, their PO box is in Burns Lake. They are another 40km off the path. Not worth the effort. So I stopped at the Tourist Info in town and told them I was looking to camp. She looked at me weird. Said there was a municipal campground, but rowdy town drunks hang out there. And there's no drinking water. Welp. How about a hotel. So that's how I got to Lakewood Inn. I don't know how I got a room for $49 bucks. But I'm the only occupant in this big ass hotel. Knowing now that there are town drunks, I'm nervous about the bike outside. But the proprietor promises it will be fine.

That now brings me to a couple issues:
1. As I slow from 40mph - 36mph, with my hands light on the bars, my bars wrench back and forth. Which kicks my confidence in the nuts, as I'm now all concerned about a tank slapper. Plus the dealer already retorqued my steering at my 600mi check in interval. I've put the bike on the center stand and tried to see if there is play in the forks, but I'm not feeling anything. So I'll play with the rear pre-load a bit tomorrow.

2. As I'm doing a wide arch into the gas station, a woman darts into the pump I was heading for, so I had to quickly alter my radius (I was idling at maybe 5mph). My big berth pannier clipped the concrete safety post. You know the rest. So there I am with a bike on my foot, trapped between a pole. I managed to get my foot out, multiple people walk by. Say nothing. Probably better. I was embarrassed. Another guy pulls up and said he dumped his bike at a gas station. And helps me heft it back up. Only now is my foot starting to hurt. Probably just a bruise. Not a scratch or ding or anything on the bike. Thankfully, and hopefully this will be the only time.

Tomorrow it's on to Stewart. I'm hoping to get there early so I can do some exploring. Believe there is a bear observation area at Salmon Glacier. Also, looking forward to stepping across the border to AK in Hyder. I hope the weather is as beautiful tomorrow as it was today.

I'm thinking that the wobble can be cured by moving some of the heaver items forward on the bike. Are you feeling the wobble when low on fuel? This sounds like weight bias to the rear.
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Old 07-08-2013, 04:03 PM   #47
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Shifted load forward. Dialed in more preload. Even on empty tank, it's still there. Getting ready to pull everything of and try it naked.
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Old 07-08-2013, 07:15 PM   #48
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Getting ready to pull everything of and try it naked.
Come on Chris, no one needs to see that.
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Old 07-08-2013, 08:25 PM   #49
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Come on Chris, no one needs to see that.


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Old 07-09-2013, 08:22 AM   #50
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July 8 :: Now this is awesome. :: Stewart, BC / Hyder, AK


Today was fantastic. It was a relatively short day of travel, I've been trying to pick up miles on the front end so that I can enjoy places like Stewart. I'm glad I made the initial time investment.

I was up at 5:45am. Confident that I'd been gnawed on by bed bugs. But a thorough inspection turned up nothing. Guessing I got bit the night before as I was wrapping up bike maintenance. Then I did my normal morning interneting and read that I guy on a BMW GS had hit a moose a couple days prior, in Prince George. And that another GS rider had been picked off by an RV. Kind of a morbid dose of reality.

Sure, I did all the proper planning. I don't ride aggressive. I wear all the gear. I've got my emergency contact info on my jacket sleeve. A SPOT tracker that's tied to Search and Rescue insurance. But it really shook me this morning. I was riding just at the speed limit. Fully alert. Decided to stop at a little cafe in Houston. After I had a bagel in me and chance to process everything, I was ready to go.

From there on out, it was spectacular. My face hurts from smiling the whole time. Stunning scenery. Finally getting some use out of my camera. And this was just the stretch from Houston and west.

Then I started north on the Cassiar/37. Wow. But even that was nothing. After reading countless stories about the Stewart area, I had planned a day long diversion. And I am so glad a did. Riding right along the base of mountains, river flowing beside the road. Clear view of waterfalls and glaciers. Simply stunning. Of course, as soon as I turned into the Stewart Highway, it started raining. And the cloud cover is dense.

I stopped at the King Edward Hotel. Asked about Salmon Glacier, they told me that with the cloud and fog cover, nothing would be visible. On top of that, she said the road would be pretty nasty. I figured with my stock street tires and the lack of visibility, it wasn't as enticing to make the 40mi round trip trek. Bummer. Hopefully tomorrow is nice and clear. Maybe I can get an early start and head to check it out.

So instead, I headed into Hyder, AK. Officially crossing the AK border. Which is interesting, because there is no US border patrol. You just drive in. Then there's a ghost town. With no open shops. I was hoping to check out the Glacier Bar, which I've read about, reportedly there is close to 50,000 bucks pinned to the wall. Started back in mining days. Miners would tack their money to the wall, put their name on it and the next time they were back, could use it to pay the tab.

Got the obligatory photo at the entrance to Hyder and then turned back into Canada. At the Canadian border crossing, it was a fiasco. The woman was asking me about why I visited Hyder, if I purchased anything, etc. Just doing her job. But then I was trying to get my passport, struggling to leverage it out of my jacket. So she pulls it out for me, but then pulls out my wad of cash. On top of that, I've renewed my passport less then a year ago, so my only stamps are a Brazilian visa (from going to the F1 Grand Prix) and about 20+ stamps from the Toronto airport (working with Cadillac and GM in Canada). This elicits more questioning. But finally I get through. Which is better off then being the shirtless Somalian guy in handcuffs.

Back to the hotel, I meet up with three guys from Alberta, friends who are riding and fishing together for a week. A retired Navy officer from Albany on his way to the BMW National Rally. And a couple (also ADV'ers) on Harley's who are touring around and then heading to the BMW Rally. Great folks. All with pieces of advice and suggestions for what routes to take and where to stay. They've all managed to see, wolves, moose, bear and bald eagles. To date, I've seen four deer, two of which were dead, a fox and a hawk. I really can't wait to see some of this, but I really want it to be on my terms vs their's.

While sitting there chatting, I saw another group of kitted out GS bikes go by, likely off to Hyder or Salmon Glacier. And as I turn, one of them is Paul, the guy from Chicago, that I met two days ago. He wasn't originally intending on doing Stewart, but said others kept suggesting it, so I'm guessing he changed his mind. Hopefully we can meet up and ride the next day as I think his next stop was also Watson Lake.

Most frequently I'm asked a series of questions:
1. where are you from
2. where are you going
3. what mileage do you get
4. why do you have a Brazilian visa

But most surprising:
What does your wife think of all of this? or Your wife allowed you to do this?

Which led me to think, I've got a pretty damn supportive wife. We've only been married for a year and a half, so maybe it's the honeymoon phase, but she's known I was going to do this. And she's never said anything to discourage me. Nor has she complained about how long I'll be gone. So she's probably sleeping with the neighbor.

As I was chatting with the Harley couple, who also ride KLRs together, I realized, this would have been pretty cool to do with her. But she's not a rider. And I don't know if I'd want a pillion for that long of a trip. Maybe we'll start with a day or weekend trip once I'm back at home. Regardless, I'll be back this way again some day, but maybe with a pop up trailer in tow.

Later in the evening, I met up with the Harley couple, Todd, didn't catch her name, they are based out of Vancouver, WA. Spent a lot of time chatting about various rides. Good folks. After dinner, I took a stroll down the boardwalk. What a stunningly beautiful place. I was truly in awe.

Following, I meandered around the old town and ended up at the only bar in the place. Where I was the only patron. Spent a long time talking to the bar keep. She has two kids and said she'll eventually move. Once the kids get to highschool, there's no real classes or teachers, they do everything online.

As we continued talking, she told me she volunteered for the Bear Aware program, basically making sure people are responsible with their belongings, garbage, etc. If a bear becomes too domesticated, the wardens tag it and then take it far away, but she says the bears always come back. Which, unfortunately, means they are destroyed. Then she told me there was a crazy old woman who used to run the dump, she began feeding a wolf. Long story short, the wolf goes the way of Bambi's mom. Turns out she's doing it again, she said you can damn near hand feed the wolf. So it's only a matter of time. In the end, the dump lady has since been fired. She said Salmon Glacier will not be visible again tomorrow. Which is a huge bummer. But if I get an early start, she guarantees I will see bear foraging along 37 back to the Cassiar. Here's hoping.

Tomorrow it's Watson Lake, I'm sure the drive will be beautiful, but I'm really looking forward to the next couple days as I get into Skagway and then take the ferry to Haines. Really glad that I decide to do this, I'm sure this is something I'll think back on and talk about for years to come.
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:17 AM   #51
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Glad to see you enjoyed Hyder and Steward.....if you think they are spectacular, you ain't seen nothing yet! Don't rush to Watson Lake, it's a bit of a let down IMHO, sure the sign post forest is interesting but that is it. No use staying any longer than for that. Again, search Telegraph Creek, again, you will love it. It's an in and an out, but well worth the time and if your camping there are many free areas to use that the locals use during hunt seasons. Bare places in the bush next to the winding gravel road....or there is a spot right on the edge of the canyon where you could drop a tent and listen to the river flow far beneath you. We missed it as we didn't know about it. Next time I will camp there for sure! It's on the left side closer to the end of the road, if I recall correctly it may even have a shitter for the tourists.
Again watch your speed with the wildlife on 37, they will bounce onto the road at the worst time. I nearly hit a cow moose as she stood in the centre of the road and waited for her calf to bouce out. Then she slowly walked into the opposite side and disappeared before I could stop shaking enough to get the camera out. If I had have been going any quicker I would still be on the Cassier stuck to the side of that moose!
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:53 PM   #52
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July 9 :: Holy shit, bear! :: Cassiar and Watson Lake

No way around it. I woke up late. 8:30. Was on the road by 9:30, it's only 400 miles. What I neglected is that 400 miles on the Cassiar is a lot different then the 500 miles I was pulling on the plains. I experienced all kinds of weather. Warm and nearly 70 to as low as 38 degrees. Sometimes it was bright and sunny, sometimes it was cloudy and raining. I guess I should expect that when in the mountains.

The views continued to be stunning but with the weather, it was suggested that I avoid Salmon Glacier and Telegraph Creek. Have to hope that there will be a second chance to visit those areas. I've heard nothing but great things.

And I saw my first bear. Black bear, sitting six feet off the road and eating at some brush. It looked at me and continued to eat as I eased by. Then just before the turn off to Watson Lake, I spotted another one, this time I turned around to snap a quick picture. Stunning. And so cool to see them in their natural habitat.

I had heard horror stories about Cassiar road conditions, construction, etc. There were only a couple construction sections, all of which were nice and short. There was a down hill winding section that was all wet gravel. But not an issue if taken at the proper speed. I also encountered wood planked bridges. Easy. And a few, sort, metal grated bridges. Hate those. Actually, I hate bridges and heights in general. But grated bridges get the goosebumps going. I know I'm in for many more and much longer ones.

Fueling was another debacle in itself. There are limited fuel areas along the Cassiar, so people stop at each one. The problem is, there is often only 2-4 pumps. So there are people lined up like it's the fuel embargo. And they are all angry. Heaven for bid someone doesn't pull all the way forward to leave berth for the vehicle behind you. In general, Canadians are known for being polite. That goes out the window at gas stations. It was certainly fun to observe.

Now the mileage, 400+ miles on a mostly paved and maintained road doesn't sound too bad. However, this factory seat is not cutting it. I can ride for about an hour. Tops. Then the pain in my ass is just too much and I find myself focusing on that vs the road. I will have to find a solution for the stock seat. The sheepskin butt pad helps, but not enough. Hopefully, I can find an Airhawk or something at Alaskan Leather in Anchorage.

Once in Watson Lake, I stopped at the info center and the Sign Post Forest. It is what it is. A bunch of signs. It was cool, but I didn't spend long there. Once again, huge props to Canadian Tourism Board. Those roadside tourist info places are outstanding. I signed today's guest book and it initially looked like I'd came the furthest, but turns out some krauts from Germany topped the list.

Which leads me to my accommodations. I'm staying at the Air Force Lodge. I believe I read about it in Milepost or elsewhere that it was a neat historic hotel. And it is neat. As I get in I'm greeted by the proprietor. Well, first I had to remove my shoes. In the lobby there are probably 18 pairs of boots and shoes. Cracks me up. But certainly keeps the place clean. Essentially, this joint used to be the lodge for the Air Force. Hence the name, right? It's dormitory style. Shared showers and bathrooms. Which is, at initial glance odd, but in the end, it's not much different then if I'd been camping. Except there I could have worn my shoes. The place seems to be popular with bikers, there are probably 8+ bikes in the lot.

And those krauts? Pretty sure they were at the shared dining table/foyer/Shoe Carnival. Eating ramen noodles and an entire baguette. Too damn comical.

Tomorrow it's officially into Alaska. Hyder doesn't count.
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:41 AM   #53
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Just found this thread! Thanks for sharing the details of the adventure. I'm quite enjoying the write-up, even with all those extra apostrophes. ;)

Moar pics plz? I'm sure you've got some beautiful ones.

Ride safe.
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Old 07-10-2013, 11:36 AM   #54
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I'm quite enjoying the write-up, even with all those extra apostrophes. ;)
Great... now we have an extra ampersand....

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Old 07-12-2013, 10:07 PM   #55
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July 10 :: Whoa, this is awesome. :: Skagway, AK

The ride today was fantastic. The Alcan was nice and smooth. Very few trucks. Limited construction. I made excellent time. The ride out of Watson Lake was pretty, but it became outstanding once I took the cutoff for Cacross and Taggish.

The road through was smooth, winding and the sun was shining bright. As I got to Taggish, I spotted a sign for Slow Cooking Meals. Seemed like a great idea. Turns out there's a small resort, Six Mile River Resort. They've got all sorts of old items decorating the outside, old outboard motors, license plates, etc. When I pull up, I have an overwhelming smell of fresh pizza. Turns out the woman that runs it does all kinds of great pizzas, sandwiches and more. I ordered the steak sandwich and she actually made the bread for it in the pizza oven. Was certainly the best meal I've had on this trip.

Carcross was an interesting little town/tourist trap. I turned off, not knowing what to expect. But I certainly wasn't prepared for bus loads of tourists. They were all over the place. Walking in the middle of the road, not looking where they were going, crazy. There were ten buses while I was there. Suddenly all the folks vanished and I was able to get some nice pictures of the town.

The road into Skagway tops the road into Stewart. Sure, Stewart had Bear Glacier, but the road conditions and sights en route to Skagway certainly top it. There were multiple waysides with stunning sights, but you had to hope that a tour bus wasn't already there, or wouldn't arrive while you were there. I hit the tourists every time. I'd just get off the bike and walk the opposite direction, until I heard them load up. As I returned one time there were some Japanese folks taking their picture with the bike. Peace sign and all. On that, I also had a few tourists taking photos of me.

About halfway down the road into Skagway, there's a Yukon Suspension Bridge. I thought it was a historic site, so I ponied up the $14 to check it out. Turns out, it's not historic at all. They just built a suspension bridge across a canyon. To trap tourists. And boy did they. I'm not sure how long the bridge is, but I'll tell you that I only walked about six feet of it and then turned around. It swayed and undulated, especially as the kid ran and jumped in the center. No thank you.

Arriving in town was a bit of a debacle. There are thousands of tourists teeming the streets. Again, none of them paying any attention. I hadn't decided where I was going to stay prior to arriving, so I thought I'd just chat with the folks at Tourist Information. The problem is, they mostly cater to folks who are on shore leave from the cruise ships. She was generally unhelpful. I found a shitty little RV park that allowed me to throw my tent up.

With the tent up, I headed back into town to Skagway Brewery. They had some decent beers on tap. Ended up chatting with a guy who was wearing a Minnesota Twins hat. And then another guy from the restaurant staff came out to join us. Turns out he had lived in Minneapolis and Duluth, working for Pizza Luce. They invited me out to another pub that was having karaoke night. Once there, I met three other folks from Minnesota. I'd heard there were quite a few transplants in Alaska, but it was still surprising. The pub even had a Minnesota Twins sign on the wall.

There are a lot of rough and tumble guys, many who operate heavy machinery for mining or logging. And the women were all trying a bit too hard to be done up. But the one thing that unites them is all of the expensive ass outdoor apparel they wear. Marmot. Patagonia. North Face. Icebreaker. It's crazy. But I guess if you have this type of weather, you invest in the best gear you can.

Well, except for that one guy. I had already named him, Pimp of Skagway, but a local told me his name is George. He appears to be late 30's, early 40's, possibly greek. Anyways, this guy has on a floral shirt, unbuttoned down to his nipples. I've watched him, multiple times, fluff his chest hair. Then he has this black leather duster/car coat. And some horrible square toed shoes. Everyone knows George, but doesn't know anything about George. This guy is just a blast to watch as he tries to impress women. Cutting in to dance with them. Singing cheesy karaoke songs. Before I know it, it's now 1am. Alaska Time. Walking back to my campsite, I'm remembering that I didn't blow up my sleeping pad. Crawling into my tent, I decide screw it and just sleep on the ground.

It was the best night's sleep I've had yet. Evidenced by the fact that I woke up at 10am.

I sit here, in the ferry terminal, waiting on my boat to Haines. The weather is a bit dreary, so visibility is low. Not sure how long I'll explore Haines, but then I'll make a short run up the Haine's highway, until I find a place to camp.

Tok the following day and then into Anchorage, swap the tires and do an oil change.
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:10 PM   #56
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July 11 :: Ferry to Haines :: Skagway, Haines, Yukon

Today was a relative down day. A lot of waiting around for the ferry from Skagway to Haines. I'm glad I decided to do this route. The ferry, while only an hour long, was like a small cruise. Incredible sights along the Fjords. It's pretty crazy the amount of vehicles those ferries can swallow.

Because this was part of the Alaskan Marine Highway System, there are much longer routes. The place was decked out with staterooms, a great cafeteria, gift shop and more. For only $60 it was worth it.

I had planned to just stay in Haines, but after putting around, I didn't see anything that really merited staying. So I took off north. Confident that I'd find campsites along the way. Which should have been foreshadowing.

Stopping in the Bald Eagle preserve was fascinating. I really don't know much about birds, in general. So it was neat to read some of the facts about the eagles. Apparently they keep their nest and build on to it each year. Some of the nests get so large and heavy that they fell the tree. The largest nest on record was 20 feet deep and weighed three tons. Mind boggling. As I was pulling out an eagle swept out of the tree line and flew along overhead of me. Remarkable.

At this point, I still haven't found any campsites. It's approaching 7pm. Typically, I try to be done riding by 5-7pm. About 45 miles outside of Haines, you re-enter Canada. The border guard suggested I ride about 100km to Million Dollar Falls campsite. I was hoping there would be something closer, but that was the closest site. She commented on all of my gear, the SPOT tracker and that I had my medial and emergency contact info on my sleeve. Said she was glad to see that I was riding smart. Then she said, "you even have platinum status." I was a bit confused, then remembered my Delta Sky Priority/Platinum luggage tag is on my duffle.

The scenery continues to be remarkable. In fact, it most reminds me of Iceland. Rocky plains, mountains, rivers, low shrubbery. Spectacular.

The camp ground is nice, but no well or water. There is a stream, so if I get desperate, I'll boil off some water. There's free firewood, but it's all huge and soaked. After man handling some of the logs with my machete I was finally able to get the fire going. There are only three other people in the site, all in trailers. I've got my food packed away in my panniers and about 50 feet from my tent. Bear spray at my ready. On top of that, the sky looks foreboding. It's going to pour tonight. Will be a fun wet and cold morning packing all my stuff away.

Given that I got a 100 mile head start on tomorrow's mileage, it should make for an easy ride to Tok. I'm now debating getting a bit further past Tok. This will allow me to get to Anchorage earlier and try to get my tires mounted at Alaskan Leather.
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:14 PM   #57
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July 12 :: Shitty roads abound :: Tok, AK

Well, it didn't rain a drop last night. Was super surprised to wake up to a completely dry camp. The bugs were in full force. So I packed under the haze of a mosquito net. I probably left camp at around 9am. I was in no rush, as last night's run had put me up 100mi closer to Tok.

And again, the views didn't disappoint. Tulane Lake was spectacular. I have no idea why I didn't take any photos, but it looks like all the photos I've seen of Lake Louise.

However, the riding was rough today. All around Tulane and Destruction Bay I was battling heavy cross winds that were blowing me here and there. Generally, wind is what I hate most when riding. I'll even take a tailgater over strong gusts. But that was just the beginning of the day.

I went through three construction areas where I had to wait 10-15mins to follow a pilot truck through the zone. They were regrading, chipping, sealing, you name it. Even the piloted areas were ridiculous. The gravel was prom night fresh. My front wheel was darting here and there. Then as the pilot truck pulls off, we've got another 10mi of gravel. Given that I'm leading the pack of vehicles going 35mph, I pull off and let the caravan of RVs and tankers go by. A butt clinching 15mins later, I'm back on pavement. I'm really hoping the knobby tires I'll put on in Anchorage will give me a bit more footing in those areas.

Then the frost heaves. Holy shit. Craters. Whoopty woos. I managed to come off the seat and land on my nuts during one of the unexpected ones. Another time, I'm at the apex of a sweeping curve and hit a crater. Handle bars start going all floppy. I loosened my grip on the handle bars and it straightened itself back out. Certainly a scary moment. There was oil, from the chip seal, in random areas, which would make the rear end squirrelly. Once back in Alaska, the roads smoothed up, but they had areas of gravel, again, not packed down, completely fresh, where you had to jump on the brakes to make it through. The whole time I had an Outback on my ass. I kept waving him by and he never passed. Finally, I just pulled off, I was finding myself spending too much time watching the mirrors then the road in front of me.

I had planned to stay at the biker campground outside of Tok. Figured it would make for some cool story telling over beers and a fire. In the end, I wanted a clean hoop and would shiv someone for a shower. I ended up at Fast Eddy's, who also owns a campground. The bathroom and showers are cleaner then my house at home. The site is all gravel and sucks. But for $17, a clean shower, toilet and wifi at their restaurant, I'm fine with it. I've worn the same shirt since day one. With a Marmot mid layer. And the same pair of socks for the last three days. I smell like some weird kind of vinegar. Thankfully, the shirt doesn't smell, nor does the jacket. But removing my boots nearly makes me vomit. This is all new to me, as I'm not typically a stinky shoe guy. I guess the waterproof boots just don't breathe. Can't wait to do laundry once I hit Anchorage.

I also finally had US cell service and was able to talk to my wife on the phone. We talked for nearly an hour. While I travel a ton for work, this is probably the longest I've been gone from her. In talking to her, I get the sense that she's trying to pick up shifts at the hospital, work around the yard, study for boards and spend time with family to distract from the fact that she's nervous about what I'm doing. Was good to talk to her. I'm certainly looking forward to the homecoming to see her and the pooch.

Right now, I'm only about a third of the way into the trip. I'm already so satisfied that I could go home feeling accomplished. I'm hoping the weather plays nice and that Denali, Top of the World, and God please, the Dempster are nice and sunny.

While I do love my bike, I kind wonder what it would be like to do it on something entirely different. When I pull into bike lots, the decked out Harley's catch my eye. Not the chromed out show queens, but the ones that you can tell have some mileage on them. At lunch I chatted with a Harley guy and he pined over my bike. But it's almost a bigger accomplishment to do this on a Harley. He'd even done the Dalton, with all of like 3" of suspension travel. On that, I think that the coolest folks on motorcycles are the Harley folks who are in full gear. I've now met and chatted with five or so Harley riders who are all decked out in Klim or Olypmia suits, full face helmets, etc. Generally, Harley guys look like pirates. It's good to see there are a few who respect the dangers and risks of long riding.

Oh and the seat? It still sucks. I have to find a solution in Anchorage, I've got a few nearly 600mi days on the tail end of my trip. And it won't happen in my current configuration.
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Old 07-13-2013, 07:53 AM   #58
selkins
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Continuing to enjoy the story. Take the time for more pics! You'll be glad for that extra time it takes when you look back at the pictures in six months. Top of the World and Dempster won't disappoint, and I think you're going to enjoy Dawson as well.
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Old 07-13-2013, 12:02 PM   #59
Johnny Locks
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Spenard Hostel

Quote:
Originally Posted by 73datsun View Post
July 12 :: Shitty roads abound :: Tok, AK



Oh and the seat? It still sucks. I have to find a solution in Anchorage, I've got a few nearly 600mi days on the tail end of my trip. And it won't happen in my current configuration.
If you don't have a set place to stay in Anchorage I'd recommend the Spenard Hostel. Great place to stay, and MotoQuest Tours is about a block away, they would certainly know about every option in town for getting a different seat, or seat cover or whatever. Plus they are super cool. If you do stop in to MotoQuest, if Brenden is there, tell him "Hi" from John in Minneapolis.
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Old 07-15-2013, 08:53 AM   #60
ManiZ
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I look forward to reading you updates. Looks like you're having a ton of fun!

But why do all your pics look like they were taken with the beta version of some first-gen digital camera...or an old polaroid and scanned with a beta version scanner?
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