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Old 07-05-2013, 03:02 PM   #121
WhicheverAnyWayCan
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Curious, if a small group of ATV or dirt bike were to want to do this route on their own time without being included in the rally, is it doable? Or is it highly recommended to be part of this organized event for few reasons such as traveling through private land and such? Just wondering!

And where can one obtain the track or is it owned by the promoter? If possible, can the map/tracks be purchased at a price just like TAT map?

WhicheverAnyWayCan screwed with this post 07-05-2013 at 03:14 PM
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Old 07-05-2013, 03:15 PM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Curious, if a small group of ATV or dirt bike were to want to do this route on their own time without being included in the rally, is it doable? Or is it highly recommended to be part of this organized event for few reasons such as traveling through private land and such? Just wondering!

And where can one obtain the track or is it owned by the promoter?
My take on this is that you could certainly do this route on your own with a small group of ATVs and/or dirt bikes. In fact, SR and Miguel and others pre-ride these routes for each of the Rutas, proving it can be done.

SR can probably get you the GPS track. These are logging and mining roads and ejido-access roads, Walter Bishop does not own the rights to the tracks.

You would certainly want to plan gas and water fills, and have a plan should someone break down in the middle of nowwhere.

The event did not provide for gas and water, entrants were on their own.

There was a lunch provided both days, however.

Food in the backcountry apart from this would be difficult to source, although there are some small mountain burgs you could probably get both from.

The route varies somewhat year to year, so next year's route probably won't look like this year's.

Don't let the challenges sway you from thinking about coming down and giving this a go. The scenery in the Sierra Madre Occidental rivals any found anywhere, and of course, your reward is grilled lobster on the beach at Mazatlán.

One thing I would be prepared to do if I was with a smaller group - stay out in the Sierra overnight. Some of these sections are remote.

This was just my take on this. SR is much better positioned to comment since he has the vastly greater experience running these ridge lines with just a few other riders.
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Old 07-05-2013, 03:24 PM   #123
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SR salutes 2 of the ATVs that would give up the ride later in the day.

A huge chunk of the ATV boys equipment simply didn't have what it took to make the route.

They were all smiles through the deer-filled piney woods, but later on, the sheer gnarlyness of the terrain would claim a ton of these rigs.
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Old 07-05-2013, 03:36 PM   #124
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With terrain like this, we'll be in Mazatlán by the afternoon!

So easy!



But the patron saint of the Sierra had other ideas......
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Old 07-05-2013, 03:39 PM   #125
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SR is well known in the Sierra

All these school kids are taught who his is

He is known as "El Alacran" ("The Scorpion")

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Old 07-05-2013, 03:43 PM   #126
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The early morning easy stuff was soon to be a memory

The relatively easy going would soon give over to switchbacks, rocks, more rocks, and even rocks that hadn't been found yet

But even my trepidation was calmed by vistas like this



But little did I know I'd be riding up, down, and through that, not just looking at it!
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Old 07-05-2013, 04:07 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
SR is well known in the Sierra

All these school kids are taught who his is

He is known as "El Alacran" ("The Scorpion")

Hey look, its El Alacran!
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Old 07-05-2013, 04:15 PM   #128
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Hey look, its El Alacran!
Way ahead of his riding pal El Despacio

Our man Jimmex:


tricepilot screwed with this post 07-06-2013 at 04:20 PM
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Old 07-05-2013, 05:28 PM   #129
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At first I thought "no way I'm watching a 26 minute plus video--don't have the time for that"....

http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=21792634&postcount=94

...

..
.

....

30 minutes later...



The guy on the 07 KLR has the same flavor as mine. Hmmmm....
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Old 07-05-2013, 06:52 PM   #130
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Man - for quote purposes I had to change your red font to white because my eyes were not ready for the 4th of July!

But yeah, a trophy truck might have done 1/4 of this ride, especially the first chunk out of Durango - but once thick into the Sierra - fagheddabouddit!!


================================================
Oh no, senor. I meant a truck to haul one of those little bitty dirt bikes from Austin to Durango, not for the ride of a lifetime!

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Old 07-05-2013, 08:43 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
SR is well known in the Sierra

All these school kids are taught who his is

He is known as "El Alacran" ("The Scorpion")

These kids don't care about handouts of candy or little trinkets. They always ask for the same thing, "caballitos". What they want is a wheelie show. At 40, I'm getting a little old for wheelies but the new WR-450 does them so well, so I try to oblige, for good community relations.

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Old 07-05-2013, 08:49 PM   #132
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Old 07-05-2013, 09:27 PM   #133
SR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhicheverAnyWayCan View Post
Curious, if a small group of ATV or dirt bike were to want to do this route on their own time without being included in the rally, is it doable? Or is it highly recommended to be part of this organized event for few reasons such as traveling through private land and such? Just wondering!

And where can one obtain the track or is it owned by the promoter? If possible, can the map/tracks be purchased at a price just like TAT map?
What more can I add to what Tricepilot said? The actual route does not go through private land. It goes through several Ejidos and Walter gets permission from them for the event, mostly as a courtesy because it's a large group. Like riding in the western US, if you come across a gate leave it as you found it.

The Sierra is a big region and there are lots of options for exploring it. You don't have to do huge crossings through extremely isolated areas the first time. You could stay up in some nice cabins and explore around and bite off smaller chunks. Groups of ATV come from Monterrey, Torreon, Saltillo, and other places often to do this. However, there is something rewarding about actually crossing the sierra, the journey with the altitude and climate change.

An organized ride like this is a good way to get comfortable with being up there. I don't think I know anyone who goes way back in there alone, my buddies and I have and will do it, but always in a group of 3 or 4 guys. Isolation is the issue.

I'm not sure how protective Walter is about the route. Naturally he doesn't want people getting the route before the event and then not signing up. That's why he changes it every year and we load the GPSs the night before the event after everyone is signed up. If you get serious about coming down pm me and I will send you the route.

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Old 07-06-2013, 06:44 AM   #134
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great trip

subscribed... caught up...and enjoying this tale
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Old 07-06-2013, 08:00 AM   #135
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Looks like it's time now for my photos from the afternoon of Day 1.


After lunch we continued west for a couple of hours on a relatively well maintained road, toward the edge of the Barranca Country. We passed one last little logging outpost and then got some good views of the Upper Rio Presidio River Valley.


Mosaic looking SE.


Mosaic looking SW.


ATV in upper left corner for scale. I was looking at the topography in Google Earth. If someone fell off this cliff, it would be about 800 m straight down. For those not familiar with the metric system, that's about a half a mile. That's why I had a parachute in that earlier photo!


Tricepilot has a strong survival instinct. Here he is skirting around the inside of the curve.




The road back up.


Tricepilot can describe this area with more flare than I can but I will say, it took us about 3 hours of downhill switchbacks to get to the bottom of this Barranca, then we crossed a river and it took another 2.5 hours to get back up. This is just one of six or seven huge E-W oriented deeply dissected drainages located in western Durango.

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