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Old 07-07-2013, 07:35 PM   #31
McCormack
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I had a '68 coup when I finished high school.

Most fun ever was when I was having the floor boards repaired and was driving around with all the carpeting and seats removed, save for the driver's seat.

It was definitely a fun car for endless cruising.
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Old 07-08-2013, 06:19 AM   #32
MountainsandRivers
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My mom still has a 66 convertible 289 3spd she bought new in 1967 for $2700. 135k on it, no rebuild, and it still gets out pretty good. Despite what others have said, it has been their most reliable car, hardly ever needed more than tires, brakes and a battery..plus you can actually work on it. Its about due for paint, but overall still in great shape. It survived me when I was sixteen. I drove it hard for a year, then bought a hot rod truck because I knew I shouldn't keep abusing the Mustang. In a few years it will be in my garage when the folks stop driving it and I plan on handing it down to my boys. Mom and I already have an arrangement. I will pay her $2700 for it, just like she did. Sure, plenty of cars can out perform it, but old cars are fun. I get it!
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Old 07-08-2013, 01:34 PM   #33
azcycle
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As stated, it will not (not without a S-ton of money) ever handle like a new car, but you know that. I love my '65 Coupe (289 4bbl) that's been in my family since new, and never restored. It was my daily driver through high school and college, even during Flagstaff winters. Put some sand in the truck and studded snow tires... I'd rooster-tail all the way to school. I don't even know how many miles mine has (rebuilt sometime in the 1980's by my grandfather). But he used to pull a trailer with it all over the western US so it's rolled over at least once. But it runs strong, still on points.

I know the market has dropped, but mine was valued at $26k about 5-years ago.



Now currently looks like this:


They're easy and fun to work on, and most parts are plentiful. Watch for rust, but if it was/is a California/New Mexico car, you may not have a problem. Mine was, too (CA/AZ) and the only spot of rust I had was behind the passenger rear tire.

Let's see some photos of your potential buy!
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Old 07-08-2013, 01:46 PM   #34
McCormack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azcycle View Post
Now currently looks like this:


They're easy and fun to work on, and most parts are plentiful. Watch for rust, but if it was/is a California/New Mexico car, you may not have a problem. Mine was, too (CA/AZ) and the only spot of rust I had was behind the passenger rear tire.

Let's see some photos of your potential buy!
Isn't it the upper ball joint that was a common issue with them because the grease fitting was impossible to get to?

I can remember welding up a tool that kept the shock from unloading so that could do the upper ball joints (shown in the Ford Shop Manual). Doing stuff like that was lots of fun. Agreed, very easy to work on!
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:13 PM   #35
Stretch67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McCormack View Post
Isn't it the upper ball joint that was a common issue with them because the grease fitting was impossible to get to?

I can remember welding up a tool that kept the shock from unloading so that could do the upper ball joints (shown in the Ford Shop Manual). Doing stuff like that was lots of fun. Agreed, very easy to work on!
Also, from the factory, the upper control arm shafts didn't have grease fittings. The oh-too-popular way for jackleg mechanics to lube them was to holesaw one-inch holes in the shock towers and swap the small plugs in the shafts with zerk fittings. Then hit the zerk fittings with a grease gun through the holes.

Over time, the shock towers flexing around the unreinforced holes caused the shocktowers to crack.
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Old 07-09-2013, 01:15 PM   #36
bomber60015
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If in great shape, that's a pretty good price for an enjoyable toy.

Do not confuse them with automobiles, though . . .these days, while it may be a great object to own, and said ownership could give you great joy, if anyone actually tried to sell a car that performed like that, they be laughed outa the market.

Things have moved on.

Enjoy the daylites out of it as a hobby.
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Old 07-09-2013, 01:21 PM   #37
Sniper X
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I say talk him down as much as possible, then make it a 289 hypo and 4 speed.
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Old 07-09-2013, 01:25 PM   #38
Sniper X
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I was playing in the street in July of 1965 when my Dad drove up in a bright shiny new 1065 Mustang with a 4 speed and a 289. White w red pony interior. It was nice but you could hear my Mom scream at the top of her lungs when he must have said come out and look at the new Mustang. She hated that car, she wanted a big fancy family car. He loved it. I think it was only around for about a year like all cars back then......
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:32 PM   #39
Jimmy the Heater
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I had a 65 coupe with the dreaded pee on your foot syndrome. The inner cowl pan was not painted from the factory and when it would rain your feet get wet.

Have to split the cowl to fix it right....what a pain in the ass that was.

That being said tho, if it really is almost rust free, buy it! The 1st gen Mustang FB is to date one of the most drool worth cars I've ever seen.

My favorite pic of that body style. (not mine)

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Old 07-09-2013, 02:33 PM   #40
VEGASGSA
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My first car was a '68 GT Fastback..2+2..302 and a C-4..fack I wish I had that car back..
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Old 07-09-2013, 05:03 PM   #41
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When I was in high school my dad bought a burgundy '65 2+2 like the one in the background here. His was the 200 CID six with 3-speed. Nice little car that I rolled in the rain. Replaced the roof panel and dented fenders and drove it over 100K. Finally ended its days in traffic when he was the first one hit in a line of cars, rearended in rush hour traffic and that accordioned the little car.

There's still a 289 one of these somewhere in town rusting away while the guy continues to drive it.

I think $16K is premium money for one of these, but a toy is worth what you'll pay for it. Enjoy!

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Old 07-10-2013, 12:00 AM   #42
discochris
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I wanted a first gen Mustang forever. It was my mom's favorite car, and she never got to have one. A good friend of mine had a blue 65 coupe with the 200 - an average restoration. I told him if he ever sold it that I wanted first crack at it. When he moved to Europe, I was in the midst of restoring my 66 F100 pickup, so it was not to be. That said, I don't think I'd have bought it (despite that he sold it for FAR too little). Here's why.

It's an old car. It feels old and drives old, much like my F100. As beautiful as they are, I think once the novelty had worn off, I would not have enjoyed it as much as I thought (same held true for a VW Bug convertible we had for a few years.). It's my opinion that there was a turning point with cars between 1965 and 1970, where cars felt far more modern. It's just a theory, but I also have a friend who had a pristine 1970 Impala as a daily driver in the mid 90's. The car looked showroom new - just beautiful (despite not being worth much as a collectible at the time). It was a base model 350 with a 3 on the tree, but overall, it felt far more modern in and out, and more solid overall than the Mustang of five years before.

If I were looking for a vintage Mustang, I'd be looking at a 69 or 70. More refined than the first few years, but before they got horribly bloated too.
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:57 PM   #43
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The safety gear that was mandated by the Feds in the 60s was mostly in place by 1970. You had headrests, seatbelts, beams in the doors, stronger roof structure, collapsible steering column, turn signals, reverse lights, and side markers all as standard equipment, and most cars had front disc brakes or could be ordered with them. That went a long way toward modernization. Since then we've added crumple zones, airbags, ABS, and stability control, but that took another 30 years to implement.
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:34 PM   #44
Carlo Muro
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I've never figured out exactly just what it is about a small-block Ford but if it's piped right there is nothing, and I mean NOTHING, that sounds as mean!
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:59 PM   #45
CA Stu
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I will say this, I can't even take my 67 Bronco to the grocery store without getting at least one thumbs up, and I think that's cool.
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