ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-05-2013, 06:27 AM   #16
selzbytes
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Twin Cities, Shanghai PuDong Xin District
Oddometer: 34
What to do with poo paper?

In China, and many parts of Asia it's soiled paper into the garbage can next to toilet. That is IF they provided paper. Lots of "bum guns" in Asia - frankly not a bad way to go once you get the hang of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruxix50 View Post
Since I have such limited world experience and many of you have traveled far more extensively than I ever will, I have to ask: After you´ve finished your business, are you supposed to put the soiled toilet paper in the toilet or in the garbage can next to it? In Paraguay, it goes in the can. The one next to the toilet.





Some say it´s because the pipes are small - but some poo is pretty big and it travels the pipes with no problems. Others say that the toilet paper is the problem - it doesn´t dissolve easily and causes problems in the septic system. Still others have never considered it - ¨What? You throw your toilet paper in the toilet

Whatever the reason, various international airports and bus terminals in the southern cone of South America have signs telling you to put your poopaper in the garbage can, NOT the toilet.

So what´s the answer where you have traveled? Garbage can or toilet? (´left hand´ is an alternate answer)
selzbytes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2013, 08:04 AM   #17
Rabble
mountain boy
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Kootenay Lake, BC
Oddometer: 11
Poo paper

In all of Latin America, except for high end hotels which cater to gringos, toilet paper goes in the can and it's burned at the end of the day. Although this can be an adjustment for norteamericanos it makes sense. Why clog the septic system with stuff that takes forever to break down?
Rabble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2013, 09:21 AM   #18
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
Pilgrimage to Caacupe

On December 8, thousands of pilgrims gather at the Cathedral to be blessed by the Virgin of Caacupé. I happened to travel route 2 on December 7, 2003 and saw hundreds of people making their way on foot up the hill to pay homage. Last week I decided to do the same by bike.

Home is about 10 km outside the capital city of Asunción, in the outskirts of San Lorenzo. Here was the original plan: Route 2 to Caacupé and return.





40 km each way didn´t seem too bad. It was 4:30 and the sun sets at 5:30 so I figured an hour of riding in the dark on the return trip would be fine.

This is the intersection of Routes 1 and 2. Although a major intersection, the stop sign is a recent addition and I don´t know whether or not to take it seriously.





I turned right, passed through Capiata, and arrived at this intersection. 33 km remaining and the sun was quickly plummeting toward the horizon. I wanted to see the sunset, but I just wasn´t in the right place.





Next was Itaugua and then Ypacarai. So far, everything was quite familiar since I had traveled it all by bicycle. After Ypacarai was this toll station. I had no idea whether to put myself in line with the trucks or pass by on the right - that´s what motorcycles often do. I waited for another motorcycle to pass and show me what to do while I took the picture.





I didn´t even notice dogs until after the upload.

Five minutes and not a single moto. With the police after the toll booth on the right, I didn´t want to take a chance so I put myself in line. The street vendors immediately motioned to me that I was to bypass the whole thing. I proceeded as instructed and the police didn´t even look at me with my hi-vis vest, bright helmet, and headlight on.

Then it was up the 3mile long hill, passing everybody on the way. 45 mph is fast around here, apparently. I parked the bike on the edge of the well-lit city plaza, and walked two blocks to the catedral where the child vendors immediately approached and tried to sell me something. Most will walk away after ´gracias´ and a shake of the head.

One little 7-year old girl had a different approach. She gave me the gift of a rosary. When I refused, ´How can you refuse a gift? All I ask is that you buy one of the other rosaries I have here.´ I said ´gracias´ again and she got more whiney and more aggressive. Apparently the approach has worked before and it worked for me. I returned her rosary after I dug a couple of coins out of my pocket and gave her a gift of my own. She walked off to give another rosary to another tourist.

There was, of course, a mass in session and I snapped a pic of La Virgencita of Caacupé.





I figured it was time to eat something and an hamburguesa completa was calling my name. That´s a hamburger with a fried egg, fried ham, and whatever type of salsa you choose. It´s seriously good. Better with cheese. My wife makes them for me sometimes.





I figured that was it. I´d already sent a text to my wife telling her that I was leaving Caacupé and I´d be home in an hour, barring any misadventures. It didn´t turn out like I thought it would.
__________________
RUXIX50

ruxix50 screwed with this post 08-07-2013 at 06:15 AM
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2013, 09:57 AM   #19
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
Smoke

YES. They burn everything. All day. If you hang your clothes out to dry, watch out, somebody in the neighborhood is going to start a fire and if you leave the clothes out downwind, they´ll stink of smoke.

On my first long night ride, I had to slow down to 25 mph on a straight country road since the smoke lay like a thick fog over the little valley from various small fires. At least four neighbors within 50 m start a fire like this every day.

Garbage pick-up exists, but you have to pay. If you don´t pay for a couple of months, they don´t take your garbage. If they don´t take your garbage, you still have to get rid of it somehow so some burn it and some pile it in one location with all the neighbors´ garbage, perhaps hoping that the municipality will pick it all up some day.





Notice the creek in the foreground and the park in the background. When somebody mentions that North Americans pollute the earth, remember this. It´s relatively common even in the capital city.

But also keep in mind that poverty is deep and real here. It affects the way you think and act in every moment of every day.
__________________
RUXIX50
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2013, 12:37 PM   #20
rbsride365
Hi-Viz
 
rbsride365's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
Oddometer: 329
Nice post.

Nice post B. Next time were in town for dinner I'm voting for hamburguesa!
__________________
ride 365!
rbsride365 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2013, 05:59 PM   #21
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
mandi´o

How about some mandioca with your hamburguesa completa? Next time we get together, that´ll be the menú. Y vamos a tomar guaraná también, verdad?
__________________
RUXIX50
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2013, 12:33 AM   #22
humanbeing
Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2007
Oddometer: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruxix50 View Post
... the tachometer above does indicate that my little thumper idles at above 2000 rpm. It tends to stall at lower speeds...
1400 +/-100 is the recommended rpm for these "push rod" machine.
humanbeing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2013, 04:32 AM   #23
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
Vibrating Bolts

The first time I took it for a long highway run it started stalling when I pulled up to stop lights. It was disconcerting to dangerous. I had no idea what was going on so I just held the throttle open a bit until I got home. I pulled off the side covers and inspected the carb since I figured it was a fuel delivery problem.

There only seemed to be one adjustment screw that was easy to access so I backed it out a quarter turn. The problem got worse so I returned it to its original position and tightened it a quarter turn. Problem solved. It´s one of those screws with a spring around it so the vibration must be backing it out. It´s happened twice since then and I don´t like it to idle so high but below that it´s not stable.

The bike came with a helmet that fits my wife, a quart of oil for the first (free) scheduled maintenance for warranty, and a hi-vis reflective vest with Kenton written all over it. No owners manual, of course.

It makes me wonder what else is going to vibrate loose and fall off.
__________________
RUXIX50
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2013, 05:25 AM   #24
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
The Return from Caacupe

It was about 7 pm when I finished mi hamburguesa completa and headed back to the bike. I put on all my gear and headed back to the highway toward home, thinking that maybe I´d take just one detour on the way back.

In front of me was a semi whose driver decided to take his truck across the center line and pass some cars. He stayed out there so long that he forced five oncoming cars onto the shoulder. Maybe it´s time to leave the main road for a bit.

My mother-in-law was born in Atyra and it´s pretty close to Caacupé so why not make a quick run out there, snap a picture, and return? That´s where the ride really took a good turn.

It´s a nice little town at the end of the paved road that is known for being clean. After 10 km of no lines painted on the road and ´dangerous curve´ signs every three dangerous curves, I arrived.





There were very few cars on the way there and I was able to keep my high beam on most of the time and kinda see the road. There was a sign for the town of Altos so I figured I needed to go there too - it´s not too late and nobody really needs me at home - the only problem was that it was one of those rock roads and 10 km on that with this bike was not going to happen. So I drove around Atyra for a bit and returned to Route 2 to continue home.

There was a burrowing owl in the middle of the road that took off and flew over my right shoulder. Pretty cool.

I hit the valley of the Lago Ypacarai and I figured I needed to visit San Bernardino since my sister-in-law had recently been there. So I turned off the main road and experienced, once again, the joy of back roads and little traffic in the darkness.

It was too beautiful and too fun and I just had to keep going. 10 km more to Altos? On a paved road this time? Gotta do it. By the time I got to Loma Grande, I knew it was going to be a really long ride.

As I continued, there was less traffic, fewer cars, and more stars. I really expected the pavement to end but it never did so I kept going. Every time I found a really dark spot, I stopped the bike, threw myself on the ground, and stared in wonder at the stars and the clearly visible milky way. Different stars, too - can´t see the north star from here.

When I hit Loma Grande, it was only 22 km to Route 3 and around 25 km back to Route 2. I had some vague idea that I could circle the lake and come back through Luque, but with no GPS and no map, I was guessing a bit.

Press on. Nueva Colombia. Emboscada and Route 3. A sign for Limpio! Yes! Limpio to Luque to San Lorenzo is a straight shot.





The original plan was Caacupé and back. This is how it turned out.





Between Routes 2 and 3 was a great ride with no traffic except for the fact that it got pretty cold in some valleys, I was totally unprepared, and there were no stores that were open. The last gas station was in San Bernardino.

80 km out and back turned into a 180 km lake loop in the darkness. I tell people this story around here and they just sit there in shock. Nobody does stuff like that around here, but it was only a bit over 100 miles.

Thanks to my wife and her family for taking care of things and kids while I was out unexpectedly until 10 pm.
__________________
RUXIX50
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 04:47 AM   #25
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
Cerro de Yaguaron and the Sunset

50 km on Route 1 takes you to Yaguaron and then Paraguarí. I´ve only been out there by bus - it takes a long time and you often don´t get a seat. But the towns are cute and both have hills called ´cerros´ that rise up out of the flat topography that is Paraguay. From Paraguarí:





Most of these hills don´t have any kind of ascending road, but I had been up the cerro Yaguaron and there was a path that I figured I might be able to ascend. It started with the common rock road or ´empedrado´ for a few hundred meters, turned into this road that reminded me of the slickrock of Utah,





and then became this





That´s as far as I got. That little machine just kept on chugging over the rocks on the right and I quit once I realized that there was no way I could get to the top. I was really a bit surprised that I was able to make it that far. This is what stopped me:





The huge, curved rear brake lever running below the frame smacked a bunch of rocks on the way down so I could only really use the front brake. The descent wasn´t too bad, but I could definitely use a more off-road capable bike. At the base of a steep walking ascent of the same cerro, a boy of 8 asked me if I was planning to head up the hill. I said that I had tried with the bike, but it didn´t make it. ¨No, you can only get up there walking, but I know the mountain pretty well, so if you want to come back, maybe Sunday, I can show you around.´ A tour guide! There´s always somebody who knows the place pretty well so if you want to explore, just ask around.

Then I finally captured the sun at the horizon in Paraguarí. I´ll have to take my wife out here. It´s really beautiful.






__________________
RUXIX50

ruxix50 screwed with this post 08-07-2013 at 06:07 AM
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 04:50 AM   #26
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
Transit Strike

Until this visit, transportation has always been by bus or bicycle. The buses are slow and they never go exactly where you want them to so a 20 minute drive sometimes turns into 90 minute trip using two bus lines. These bus companies are separate, private enterprises but somehow the bus fare is determined by the government and the salary of the drivers is provided by the government. I don´t really understand how it all works and I always get vague answers when I ask.

The inauguration of the new president is on August 15 so large numbers of government employees are on forced vacations, new government contracts are not being signed, and the government claims to have no money to pay people. A teacher´s strike over retirement benefits is ending and a couple of days ago there was a transit strike.

On Tuesday, we had been invited to my wife´s God parents´ home for lunch but with no buses and two children, we weren´t going until they offered to pick us up in their little Toyota Starlet. No room for all of us so my wife and I followed on the bike.

We never went above 50 kph. That´s 30 mph. We could have followed them pretty easily on our tandem bicycle and even arrived first if we knew the way. The thing is that it´s normal to drive that way around here unless you have plenty of money, insurance, and a car that´s in good condition.

We had a great time at their house. Good friends, great family, and excellent food. There was even a jakaré on the wall watching over us





as we patiently waited for the asadero to finish grilling the beef.





It was a one-day strike and we were back to the buses yesterday. I picked up some chicken on the way to Grandma´s house on the bike and the family took two buses. We had a great family time again, but the bus trip back was apparently horrible. Two buses and both were packed so plenty of people were standing. Our little one did not want to sit so he kicked and cried and tried to leap from my wife´s lap. Not fun.

Liliana is a friend who bought a motorcycle about five years ago. She was really slow and timid at first, but the freedom she has described is exactly why so many people use these cheap Chinese bikes as family transportation.
__________________
RUXIX50
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 05:31 PM   #27
whizzerwheel
Using Occam's Razor
 
whizzerwheel's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Settled In
Oddometer: 1,207
Nice story..
__________________
Citizens are asleep, and the media plays a bedtime story.
Costa Rica, Two Up: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=532923
A Weekend Bagel Tour: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=568464
WR's in NH and Maine: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=733821
whizzerwheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 05:54 PM   #28
Tom48
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Tom48's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Fremont NH
Oddometer: 361
This is one of the best reports that I have seen.
Thanks
__________________
Thomas Sells
Tom48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2013, 07:41 PM   #29
Signal
Cynical Idealist
 
Signal's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 8,293
Thanks-

It has been 24 years since I've seen San Lo or Capiata ...


Some looks changed, much hasn't
__________________
Day Trippin'- Endless Utah
Signal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2013, 04:48 AM   #30
ruxix50 OP
RUXIX50
 
ruxix50's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Etna, Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 73
Rohayhu Paraguay!

Thanks, guys.

I love this country and her people and I´ve always wanted to tell a story. My friends and students haven´t been here and I can only relay the feel of the place in little snippets. Until now. My continuing love of two wheels has expanded from bicycles to motorcycles and this website is the perfect place to get the story out. Plus, the bike allows me to reach out a lot farther, see a lot more, and share some of that with you.

My thanks to those of you who manage the site and thanks to those of you who visit.

Signal - you´ve been here? Cool. Was it a quick visit? On a bike? What did you get to see?
__________________
RUXIX50
ruxix50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014