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Old 08-12-2013, 09:21 AM   #1
team ftb OP
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Kriega Quick review: Overlander 30 vs GL Coyote and Dirt Bagz

Like most posters on the board I'm always open to new ideas when it comes to carrying my gear for multi day and multi week rides. Most of the rides I undertake are offroad oriented DS riding and my gear carrying preference has been soft luggage


I first road with Dirt Bagz for a few years. My impressions were an easy mounting, easy carry solution that worked well at the time relative to the competition.





The pluses were very easy to mount/dismount, easy packing, and had a nice smaller pouch on the exterior for documents maps etc. Downside was that they required brackets, and I broke the brackets often. Then I fabbed up my own brackets that kept me from busting the brackets anymore, which says a lot since I'm often looking for lost treasure in the dirt on the trail.




My primary complaints centered around them flapping in the breeze a bit and of course not being waterproof. The below pic shows the corners flopping like the ears of a galloping bloodhound.






The next improvement in carrying gear came with GiantLoops original Coyote made from rugged Cordura.



These were bombproof as most people know and instead of bolting them to the body panels I secured it with four Voile straps. This worked fine and secured the bag even more securely in terms of floppiness than the later generations of Coyotes that use the rear fender clips and webbing securing the lower corners of the bags.

Biggest issue on this model was the tiny zipper access portals provided to load gear. This made loading large items like hammocks, sleeping bags, and clothing bags awkward.


When Giantloop came out with the Coyote that utilized one long zipper across the bag and was made with the Trucker Tarp I upgraded to that model.





This was a worthwhile upgrade as the zipper access was a tremendous benefit in terms ease of loading. I road for a few years with this model and was duly impressed and thought this the bee's knees in terms of carrying gear. i could load it up for a month long slog or pack a bit smaller for less than a week jaunts and it packed both loads with no issues.

Issues i would have liked addressed was the section of bag between the lower strap and the rear fender clips when loaded with gear would flop up and nail me in the hamstrings on occasion going through deep washouts etc at speed. Since I'm a short arse my size may have been a contributing factor in that when standing and absorbing big hits I'm not all that far off the seat. Something that annoyed me more was water. Now I know the Coyotes are not waterproof and pack my gear accordingly. However on crossing such as these




The bag bottoms would fill with about 4 inches of water. i always thought water would get in but then drain out. For some reason the Coyote's would not drain and at the end of the day i would have four inches of water in the bottom of the bag. I'm guessing the water got by the zipper but the waterproof truckers tarp material would keep it in. This was not an issue during rains and only happened on these long water crossings but every long, deep water crossing I would end up carrying a liter or two of extra water.

While mostly pleased with the Coyotes ruggedness and performance it was the water ingress that had me entertain the idea of a waterproof carrying system. When Kriega announced their Overlander 30 bags as a waterproof carrying system for Enduro bikes my ears perked up. I had concerns and questions of the bags and anyone interested can search my queries in the Kriega vendor thread. Micheal the distributor is most helpful with questions as are other Kriega users. Vendor thread here: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=kriega

I ended up purchasing them and finally got them mounted up and put 5 days of traveling with them on two short trips for a gear shakedown.




The first step is that these bags require drilling and screwing some supplied fasteners into the rear fender. Spend your time packing the bags with varying loads and positioning the bags on the bike to get an Idea of what position would work well for you and your bike.



The first point I would like to make when comparing the GL Coyote and the Kriega Overlander 30 is that there is a marked difference in the carrying capacity of the two systems. Yes, even though they both claim 30 liter capacities they are from my experience not the same volume. The above pic is packed with my Hammock, down underquilts, tarp, cookware, stove and fuel, clothes, tools, and spares. The bags were about 95% full if using the three dry bag roll folds as a guide. Now in comparison this is the Coyote carrying the exact same load in addition to two liters of water.




Despite carrying the exact same load you can see the whole portion above the seat is empty. I do not think this is Kriegas fault as according to all my backpacks their stated capacity of 30 liters seems right about in the ballpark. I believe Giant Loop has actually understated their capacity. Here's the Coyote packed pretty full.



The above pic has neither my hammock, tarp nor clothes in compression bags which is how they are packed in the Kriega pics above (and so taking up far less space in the Kriega bags). In addition i have a lot of food packed, half liter of oil, and two innertubes in the Coyote that are not loaded into the Kriegas. I think this point is the most important point in my post as I sadly assumed what i could get in the Coyote I would be able to get into the Overlander 30 bags but it's simply not the case. Not a bash at either company just information that needs to get out there for consumers.

The upside of the Kriega Overlander 30 over the Coyote is that the shape is a lot easier to pack. The Kriega are rectangular shaped with a decent opening in the top of the bag that facilitates loading. In comparison the Coyotes complex curves are a bit more challenging to pack effectively. However once you get a system down it's really a non issue. After 5 years with Coyotes i could pack the awkward shape of the Coyote with no issues due to utilizing correct size compression sacks.

The Kriega bags also have three compression straps on each bag to secure your load a bit more compactly than the compression straps on the Coyote bags I have used (i've not tried the 2013 version). This is a nice feature. Kriega also include very nice webbing strap clasps to secure excess strap lengths. Well thought out.

One key criticism that i was concerned about was the over the seat strap of the Kriega bags polluting my seat space and was nervous of the buckle getting in the way of a comfortable ride when slabbing on the pavement. Funnily enough nobody brought up this issue, nor did current owners of the bag find an issue with it. In the previous pic of the Kriega bags you can see a pic of the across the seat cam buckle. This may be just me, but on an enduro bike when slabbing pavement or long flat dirt roads I slide far back on the seat to shift blood and change pressure points of the seat. When doing this with the Overlander 30 bags the buckle was positioned in a place directly where my arse wanted to be. I had experimented with mounting the bags farther back on the seat (relative to most posters in the Kriega vendor thread my bags are positioned farther back) however the top corner of the bags began to pollute the seat space as well.

One solution to aid this issue I made was widening my stock KTM 500 seat to 10 inches. This took the major complaint of mine and was able to lessen the annoyance I felt from it. I believe the added seat width allowed me to find a comfortable spot not as far back on the seat and therefore not sitting directly on the buckle like with the stock seat. That being said though, i have only two weekend trips on this system and on my old 525 with the same 10 inch seat width i used the full length of the seat when riding for more than a week., and I expect the same issue with the 500 seat.

I also experimented with strapping a 3 liter water bladder to the Kriega bag to get the weight off my back.




Still need to experiment with this system a bit to see if it's a viable option for me. One thing the Kriegas don't have is much excess strap length if the bags are packed full and you're used to lashing things to your soft bags with the compression straps. The straps were fully maxed out with this Camelbak bladder mounted. It would be nice to have a bit of extra length on the straps allowing us to cut them to a needed length.

So how secure were the bags when fully loaded and pounding about offroad? In a nutshell, more secure than the Coyote I believe primarily due to the compression straps securing the load more compactly and lessening the leverage on the strap mounts. They do move however. My heavy items (tools, spares. etc.) were loaded into the bottom of the bags which when bounced over bumps made it difficult for the fastening systems, and all manufactures (Dirt Bags, Giant Loop, Kriega) fastening systems to keep loads secure. Ideally all heavy stuff should be kept in the forward and lowest corner of the bags for better load tension however my spares and tool rolls don't cooperate so maybe time for me to redesign the carrying methods to better cope with the fastening system.



I made a video to better visually illustrate my findings. As you'll see by this thread I'm neither a great photo document-er nor do I plan out my video shoots. However Youtube is not allowing me to copy the Embed code so here is the URL.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=GurwqZV-H3Y


Keep in mind these are my finding after riding with the Coyote for years and I've only got a couple short trips with the Kriega's. I believe with a few more trips under my belt I'll be a lot more familiar with the Kriega system and be able to utilize it more effectively. Both companies make excellent products and I have been satisfied, however like all riders we can always tweak things to improve them or make suggestions to the company for further refinements in their products. That is the intention of these threads in that hopefully they read consumer feedback and listen to end consumer critiques.
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Old 08-12-2013, 12:15 PM   #2
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great review, thanks!
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Old 08-12-2013, 04:23 PM   #3
Jim K.
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Good review! 99% of my adventures are on pavement (I'm a sport bike guy) but the points you bring up are valid both on & off road. I'm very impressed with the guality & thought that went into Kreiga's tail bags & if my ancient Bagman Supremes ever wear out or break, I'll look to Kreiga for replacements.
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:43 PM   #4
bill1960
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FTB

Great review and pics of the old RFS in Indochina.

Flapping would annoy me.
Maybe Kriega could add a D ring to the lower rear corner of the bags and/or provide an attachment point with waterproof seal that could be retrofitted. You'd then need to fashion a lightweight bracket for the KTM500 but thats another story.

That buckle in the middle of the seat is a legitimate complaint. Even on bigger bikes with wider seats, there's still the possiblity of a pillion occupying that area. I'd like to see a system where only the strap occupies the seat area and a buckle or quick release is positioned off to the side.

Just a thought. If it was just the strap (no buckle) occupying the seat area, could you then have the bags mounted further forward and would that reduce the flapping ?

All that said, it's probably the best waterproof rackless luggage system on the market at the moment, at least for dualsport bikes.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:02 PM   #5
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Perhaps that is one of the most comprehensive, field tested reviews of two items I've seen.

Great job.

I'm currently a fan of the Coyote. I think I'll be upgrading to their new model. With the new waterproof stuff sacks option and you mentioning that you think it's even more than 30L, I'll stick with that.

Good luck with the Kriegas though. They look like great kit as well.


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Old 08-13-2013, 09:07 AM   #6
team ftb OP
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Originally Posted by CordR View Post
Perhaps that is one of the most comprehensive, field tested reviews of two items I've seen.

Great job.

I'm currently a fan of the Coyote. I think I'll be upgrading to their new model. With the new waterproof stuff sacks option and you mentioning that you think it's even more than 30L, I'll stick with that.

Good luck with the Kriegas though. They look like great kit as well.


C
CordR that volume capacity difference between the Coyote and the Kriega Overlander (despite they being advertised as the same volume) I think is the most important finding in this thread and something prospective buyers should be knowledgeable. It was a rude awakening for me.



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Old 08-13-2013, 09:34 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by bill1960 View Post
FTB

Great review and pics of the old RFS in Indochina.

Flapping would annoy me.
Maybe Kriega could add a D ring to the lower rear corner of the bags and/or provide an attachment point with waterproof seal that could be retrofitted. You'd then need to fashion a lightweight bracket for the KTM500 but thats another story.

That buckle in the middle of the seat is a legitimate complaint. Even on bigger bikes with wider seats, there's still the possiblity of a pillion occupying that area. I'd like to see a system where only the strap occupies the seat area and a buckle or quick release is positioned off to the side.

Just a thought. If it was just the strap (no buckle) occupying the seat area, could you then have the bags mounted further forward and would that reduce the flapping ?

All that said, it's probably the best waterproof rackless luggage system on the market at the moment, at least for dualsport bikes.

Given Kriegas usual attention to detail I am sadly disappointed in the cam buckle on the top of the seat and its basic interference with riding. An elementary fault I thought would have been discovered by the design team during testing. If Kriega reads this and needs someone with a critical eye to test some goods by all means send me an email.

Bill your thoughts of mounting them farther forward will give the bags more support from the sidepanels and therefore should provide a more stable mounting platform which should provide a benefit. However with the lower rear corner still not attached to anything it is still free to to flap about during the rebound phase of the suspension. More sidepanel supporting the bags though may lessen the amount of flap. I'll mount them a bit more forward and test them out. Only issue mounting them more than two inches more forward was that then they polluted the back of my calves a bit when dabbing my feet on the singletrack. Keep in mind being so short my feet when on the ground are directly at, or behind the pegs so I have less room between the bags and the back of my boots than say someone closer to 6 feet that can plant their feet on the ground splayed farther to the side of the footpegs.

I may entertain modifying the over the seat Camlock buckle if I cannot come to terms with it.
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Old 08-14-2013, 02:58 PM   #8
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Thanks for the great comparison/review - these are the two systems I've been considering for use with both my Husaberg FE390 and my Beemer F650 Dakar. The Overlanders would require that I stick mounts on both bikes (unless there's a way to incorporate the Touratech rack on my Dakar), but I'm sort of leaning their direction.

That's rather unfortunate about the big difference in capacity between the systems. At about the same price for the two systems, I figured I could increase the capacity of the Kriega by just adding on another top bag - but the price does start to spiral up when you start adding additional bags.
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Old 08-15-2013, 08:26 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by DeFens View Post
Thanks for the great comparison/review - these are the two systems I've been considering for use with both my Husaberg FE390 and my Beemer F650 Dakar. The Overlanders would require that I stick mounts on both bikes (unless there's a way to incorporate the Touratech rack on my Dakar), but I'm sort of leaning their direction.

That's rather unfortunate about the big difference in capacity between the systems. At about the same price for the two systems, I figured I could increase the capacity of the Kriega by just adding on another top bag - but the price does start to spiral up when you start adding additional bags.

DeFens - Kriega sell extra mounting loops so you can mount the bags on multiple bikes. I purchased another set of mounting straps to outfit my KTM 250 XCF-W also with the Overlander 30 bags.

When comparing the Coyote to the Kriegas one of the benefits I was hoping for was carrying the Coyote gear in a lower center of gravity position with the Kriega bags. As the packing capacity is not the same it would require an additional bag (to carry my gear that filled the Coyote) located once again on top of the seat/rear fender. Hence no advantage to the Kriegas in this scenario in terms of carrying all the weight lower.
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:08 PM   #10
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Hey ftb... I finally had time to fully read your review and watch your video.

In general terms, my initial feelings about the Coyote vs. the OL30 was very similar to yours. Over time, and with a bit more experimentation (or maybe just I am now used to the OL30) I do feel that the OL30 is in general a better set up.

Maybe I should have prefaced the above by saying that I used the Coyote and currently use the OL30 primarily on my Super Enduro (although I have set both up on my 400) which is a much larger motorcycle.

A couple things I would try:

1) Play with the OL30 bag location a bit. My initial placement ended up being different than I have now.

2) Try hooking the top alloy hook strap to the opposite side rack loop, so they cross each other over the top of the rear fender. This might allow you to move the bags around a bit differently.

3) For me, the strap tightening sequence made a difference in how secure the bags fit on the bike. Daisy chain, top/rear alloy hook straps made tight. Load the bags. Cinch the straps around the bags. Tighten the cam buckle over the seat.

Not saying any of this is the answer. But I know I fiddled a bunch at first. Now they go on and come off "like buttah"
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:15 AM   #11
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Thanks for the feedback TravelToad.

As you suggested I'm sure the learning curve will be steep and hoping once I have a few more trips under my belt I'll the Kriegas more dialed.

I've packed them both ways so far and have found I like the bags as far back on the seat as I can get them and with the Straps crossed over the rear fender as in the below pic. Not ideal for weight distribution but the only way I can keep the cumbersome Camlok buckle from being under my arse.



I also utilize the strap tightening procedure you suggested.

Thanks heaps for the tips and i enjoy following your Mexico rides.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:00 AM   #12
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ftb... another thought...

The cam buckle seems to be one of the more serious issues you are having with the OL30. The OL30 is pretty easy to adjust/change placement. Maybe you will find that you need two slightly different "perfect positions"?

1) Slightly more forward and lower for your very awesome (yes, I am jealous) dirt tracks.
2) Slightly higher and further back when you have longer road segments.

Another possibility... rather than try to get the buckle far enough back to not be a pain in the ass (literally), maybe it needs to be a bit more forward and when you are on those longer road segments you move your ass over and behind the buckle.
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Old 08-22-2013, 03:12 PM   #13
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Great review and pic's I guess it's what you get used to but the straps across the working part of the seat even without a buckle involved bothers me enough that my new wolfman e12's are on the bench and I'm back to using my very worn, dirty and abused coyote for the local light day rides I planned to use the e12's for.

It's not a comfort issue, it has more to do with how I move around on the seat and while it isn't much that strap is just enough to turn a subtle weight shift into a clumsy one.
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Old 08-22-2013, 04:52 PM   #14
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How come it's not touching the exhaust in that last picture?
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:49 PM   #15
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How come it's not touching the exhaust in that last picture?
The three mounting points pull it up and away from the exhaust.
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