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Old 08-27-2013, 09:20 PM   #31
MrBob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorat View Post
don't plan too much.
having a route is good, having a time table is bad.
enjoy yourself.
Something like the above, except with correct grammar.
Take lots of photos and don't worry about getting the money shot.
I listen to podcasts on my iPhone during boring stretches and reload the phone using my laptop. It's amazing how the miles fly by.
The winds in the West can make travel miserable and it's good to be prepared to change direction rather than fight them all day.
Stop at diners rather than fast food places - better for meeting people.
Try to have at least one interesting conversation each day.
Slow down.
Slow down.
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Old 08-28-2013, 01:00 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by viverrid View Post
The primary Q is, what is the purpose of the trip.
THIS!

You wanna know what your gonna hate? Your bikes seat, the weather and lack of time to take everything in.

I'll assume You HAVE to get to San Diego. I'd hump it hard to New Mexico, then wander.

Google says the trip is 2600 miles. that 3 days each way, You have 10 days to sightsee.
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Old 08-28-2013, 02:28 AM   #33
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Take breaks. A couple 400 mile days in a row is no big deal for me. 16 straight and I'd be hurtin' for sure. That's just me, but if you've never done it, you really don't know if it's you or not. Plan some rest days and, if you're not tired, ride 'em instead. Better to plan to be rested though.

The next thing I'd say is plan nthe entire trip. Then chuck that plan after your first day out.
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Old 08-28-2013, 04:14 AM   #34
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I've done a number coast/coast trips and even longer. My bikes are dual sport machines. Like others have said, you have to take care of your body first and foremost. Plus you have to be equipped for all the wild weather you will likely experience. You need to be dry and comfortable. Late in the day I suggest stopping for 5 minutes every hour.

1. Cramping is inevitable. It stems from getting dehydrated. The ONLY way to get rid of persistent cramps is to suck water out of your Camelbak. The cramps will fade in about 5 minutes. I suck water probably every 30 minutes all day long. It can be warm water. Works just as well and goes down easier.

2. Butt burn is inevitable. I wear NIKE Dri-Fit compression shorts underwear. Probably my first big discovery were these great shorts for stalling butt burn. Plus I use a sheepskin butt pad. Butt burn still eventually comes, but a lot later in the day.

3. Weather is inevitable. Wear Gortex waterproof pant and jacket. The best kind are the garments that have vents. When it is very hot, keep the gear on. It will protect you from the heat blast. When it is very wet, close the vents. If your boots are not waterproof, seal them up with silicone water proofing. Plus you need three sets of gloves. Cold weather waterproof gloves (I use Grandoe ski gloves or Black Diamond mountaineering gloves); a medium weight glove; and a vented motocross glove.

4. Heat. You'll need a heated jacket liner and bar grips. I no longer use the bar grips, but very thin heated glove liners that plug into my jacket.

5. Neck gator.

6. Good earplugs.

7. Jetboil. Handy little cooking device I use to boil water and make tea at rest stops. I never drink tea except when riding long distance.

I think staying off the interstate is too slow. I like the interstates from Boston to the Mississippi River. Nothing much to see there anyway. West of the Mississippi it gets quite spectacular, even on the plains. I usually ride the Santa Fe Trail if i'm south or the any route throgh south Dakota. Once over the front range it's fast two-lane pretty much all the way to California.

Boston to San Francisco is about 3400 miles one way. It takes me 8 or 9 days, but I usually have some side trips included. I usually leave my bike there for a few weeks, and fly back to ride it home later.

The Alcan5000 is 9 days of grinding out dual sport miles. Most years it is about 4500 miles long. But then you have to ride back to the start in Seattle. That is another 2300 miles and takes 3.5 very long days.

I find it best to start pretty close to dawn and only stop to eat twice per day. About 10:30 am and again around 3:30. I might have a snack bar at the hotel.
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Old 08-28-2013, 04:26 AM   #35
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Post up your route,and you will probably get invites from members for a meal and a bed.
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Old 08-28-2013, 04:47 AM   #36
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I posted this in another x-the USA thread, some may apply to you:

I've done it in 2.5 days. Here's fourteen tips I've learned from experience, or been given by some hard corps LD riders:
  1. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.. you could use a camelback, but limited capacity and weight on your back. I used this: http://www.st-owners.com/forums/show...dration-System IIRC, 160 ounces of liquid goodness. A folded hotel hand towel under the front of the coleman kept everything level. Fill with ice/water and ride. This is just one options, some bungee a cylindrical cooler to the passenger peg, working especially well if you have panniers;
  2. Don't dawdle at gas stops. That wasted time adds up. Gas up, use the facilities, and go. My stops were about 8-10 minutes. You can eat and drink on the road. I find in the heat I don't eat much, but drink H2O constantly;
  3. Bicycle shorts. They work;
  4. Monkey Butt/Gold Bond Medicated Powder. Either works well;
  5. Beef Jerky/Banana Chips. Texture, protein and potassium. Pack it on the bike, saving more time at stops;
  6. Down a gatorade as needed, especially if the temps are super high;
  7. If temps are super high, pack your suit with ice at each stop. You get about 60 minutes of evaporative cooling;
  8. I start at 4 - 5 am each day, as I prefer knocking out miles early, keeps me in a good mindset all day. I ride until 10 or 11, later if needed (may not apply to you, your anticipated daily mileage is much less);
  9. Stop on the far side of the big city. You avoid traffic the next morning (but leaving early obviates that);
  10. Make sure you are super visible. Reflective tape on your panniers, helmet, and reflective strips on your suit will help you be seen, and survive;
  11. Pack light (or half of what you think you'll need). You don't need much, and if you break down, see 13 below;
  12. Call your credit card company to tell them you'll be travelling so they don't see the multiple gas purchases and shut down the card. Bring cash for when they shut it down anyway;
  13. Get towing coverage from your insurance. Will save you tons if/when your bike breaks down; and
  14. Finally, consider getting an ezpass/fastpass. Depending on your route, will save you tons of time at toll roads.
Good luck.
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:04 AM   #37
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Wow great replies guys! I really appreciate it, and I'm sure others will benefit from your posts and advice as well. Lemme put some thoughts together and grab a pic or two of the 919.
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:12 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rebake View Post
Post up your route,and you will probably get invites from members for a meal and a bed.
That'd be great to meet some new folks here. I got to meet an ADV inmate Steve in Vermont earlier this year. We got some breakfast and he rode with me the first hundred miles south around Lake George to start my trip home.

I'll be sure to post my route in the trip planning section once it's a little more finalized. I'll post a link to that thread on this thread once that time comes. You guys are great, truly is an awesome community here.
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:16 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by NoVa Rider View Post
Finally, consider getting an ezpass/fastpass. Depending on your route, will save you tons of time at toll roads.Good luck.
RockinTheRVA said in the first post that he had "not one interstate". He may encounter a toll bridge or two but it doesn't look like it "will save you tons of time".

I've done days over 1,000 miles and your list is appropriate for that kind of trip. It looks like RockinTheRVA is taking the opposite kind of trip where rushing the gas stops and snacking on high-protein will reduce the amount of interaction with people.

Interstate travel puts us in contact with cashiers at high-volume businesses and travelers who want to be elsewhere. Since R.T.RVA won't be on interstates he can meet interesting and interested people far more often and in unexpected places.
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:19 AM   #40
NoVa Rider
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Could also add SPOT tracking. Allows folks to track your travels, and gives you a send help and an emergency button if needed.

http://www.findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=101
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:21 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin View Post
RockinTheRVA said in the first post that he had "not one interstate". He may encounter a toll bridge or two but it doesn't look like it "will save you tons of time".

I've done days over 1,000 miles and your list is appropriate for that kind of trip. It looks like RockinTheRVA is taking the opposite kind of trip where rushing the gas stops and snacking on high-protein will reduce the amount of interaction with people.

Interstate travel puts us in contact with cashiers at high-volume businesses and travelers who want to be elsewhere. Since R.T.RVA won't be on interstates he can meet interesting and interested people far more often and in unexpected places.
I believe I wrote that this was a post in another thread, and that "SOME MAY APPLY TO YOU." Or may not.

That being observed, carrying an ezpass can't hurt, and can save time if the interstate option is taken on the fly.
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:33 AM   #42
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Did a 7200 mile/20 day trip a few years ago. My regrets were few but I wish I'd had more time to check things out along the way. Your mileage is similar so you'll be in the same situation. Pretty much moving all the time. I camped mostly but when I had a motel room with wifi I occupied myself updating my ride report, this is a great way to kill the evenings. I'd upload photos when I stopped for lunch also. I have a camelback and highly recommend riding with one. Weather is what it is. You have no control over it other than to pack rain gear. It makes the ride more interesting.
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:43 AM   #43
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I did a 7500 miles in 21 days camping, and it was a bit too rushed, I really think that a 300 miles per day it would be the best.

Being hydrated is one of the most important thing I found, and also make sure that you have protein breaks to keep your mind sharp, don't overeat at your meals.

I have a rule made that I stick to it, NO RIDING AT DAWN AND NO RIDING AT DUSK.

Enjoy your ride.
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Old 08-28-2013, 08:53 AM   #44
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I'll say the same thing other have said. Hydration. Even knowing that, I sometimes find myself not getting enough water in me early and that will catch up to you.

I would suggest some small rehydration gel packs. They pack super easy, and really help. I have found that when I start to get tired or lethargic, that caffeine isn't the answer, it happens from dehydration. Something that helps get the water to work faster is the way to go.

You can usually find them at bicycle shops or places like that (I think the brand is called GU). The ones I have started using are these. I would suggest getting something like it, and pack a few of them in your tank bag, and if you start feeling tired or drowsy in the middle of the day, some gel and some water, and you'll be surprised how fast you come back.

http://www.advocare.com/products/active/A1403.aspx

I have found the gel and some water get into my system and gets me going again faster than gatorade or just water. Its cheap and easy to have it on the bike as an option.
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:47 AM   #45
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I wanted to take the time to read every single post. Addressing every point I can remember, here are some thoughts:

-Bike Shorts, got em! butt-savers
-Cramp Buster, very necessary
-Proper eating works wonders, agreed!
-Handlebars - these are Road Mediums, very close to stock!
-Windscreen(short) - takes some variability out if weather conditions arise
-Seat - haven’t had a problem with the 919 seat yet up to 450 miles
-Earplugs – recently discovered, I’m a big fan for longer trips, reduces fatigue

I really like and appreciate the advice given. To help with the ‘enjoying each location’ concern, I like the idea of riding as long as possible early on to get out towards Colorado quickly. I have a quick 250 mile day after work to get to family's house in WV, then it's off towards Colorado bright and early. I have ridden over 400 miles in a day so it’s a possibility. I think I should make it a goal to get to CO as quickly as possible(while having fun) then sight-see and take it easy from there until it’s time to head back.

I liked the question "What is the purpose of this trip?" I think that's a very important question, and a good purpose helps keep up the energy level. My purpose so far is to see as many things as I can that I haven't seen before and to just enjoy the ride. I had a similar purpose heading to Vermont, and learned a few things about what I enjoy and don't enjoy(i.e. cold weather is my enemy). I think the meat of this trip will be seeing what lies beyond Kansas. I'd love to see some beautiful landscapes and get a feel for the western states. I want to know what it's like riding across the desert and plains with no buildings, houses, etc in sight. I’d love to spend an extra day in Colorado just to do a big sightseeing loop(plus, my wife will be on business in CO during this time!). Finding a good purpose for doing such a long distance in a constricted time is definitely a challenge, and I will keep pondering this question as I plan.

Up until next summer I am asking some good friends if they’d like to join for the trip, but I am keeping in mind that this will likely be a solo trip. I believe riding solo, and more importantly spending the evenings solo, will be the most difficult part of my journey. I am a friendly person and love to meet new people, but sometimes you can just find yourself in an anti-social place! In one way, I think the feeling of having this experience to myself and taking it all in will help me grow as a person. I believe such experiences are rare, and can build a lot of character. On the other hand, riding with a close friend is a guaranteed fun social experience at every stop. The trip is on either way, I’ll just have to be ready for that challenge if it arises. Of course, if some inmates want to show me a fun time in their hometown that’d be a fantastic way to spend an evening or two!

If some care to take a look at my very-rough draft of the route, here it is:
http://goo.gl/maps/ORIwW
*Colorado is a must, San Diego/Tijuana is general western destination.
*Yes, would love to do the Mexico section, as I do speak Spanish. Just a very small taste as it somewhat follows my route.
*Another taste of the Blue Ridge Parkway on the return trip to keep it interesting

In the essence of this section of the forum, let’s just keep this thread about the challenges of a cross-country ride and how best to plan a trip around them. I’d love to hear advice and recommendations for detours as I start planning more early next year.

Here’s the steed at Lake George sans windscreen:


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