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Old 09-05-2013, 08:26 PM   #1
shoco OP
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Question for New Mexico Riders

I'm working in Albuquerque for a few months and want to explore the State a bit on my bike that I just had shipped here from L.A.

I see all these Tribal Roads/Routes on the map. Am I allowed to ride those, or are they restricted to tribal members?
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Old 09-05-2013, 08:33 PM   #2
gallinastrips
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Taos pueblo says No Trespassing on all their dirt access roads now, not sure about other pueblos
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Old 09-05-2013, 08:36 PM   #3
shoco OP
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Originally Posted by gallinastrips View Post
Taos pueblo says No Trespassing on all their dirt access roads now, not sure about other pueblos
Wow, that's too bad. I guess I'll try to research the local pueblos to see what their rules are.
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Old 09-05-2013, 10:25 PM   #4
Chobro
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There's plenty of legal riding to do, don't be discouraged.

This is a good group to support, www.nmohva.org, and they know all the good rides. http://www.nmohva.org/main/where_to_ride.php
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Old 09-06-2013, 06:43 AM   #5
mdsnitc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoco View Post
...Am I allowed to ride those, or are they restricted to tribal members?
There are plenty that you can explorer...

The rules I follow:
  • Respect the signs
  • Respect Locked Gates
  • Leave an Unlocked Gate the way you found it
  • Dont go through an obviously cut fence
  • Be nice, wave to the locals
  • Stay on established roads

Haven't had any trouble yet.
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Old 09-06-2013, 07:07 AM   #6
Downhill Dave
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Public lands...

BLM and Forest Service lands are open to all , native and non-native 'mericans alike.





Best starting point
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Get yourself a collection of MVUMs!!
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Old 09-06-2013, 07:13 AM   #7
wbbnm
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Generally the local Albuquerque pueblo roads are closed to outsiders probably because of the high population density.

As you get further from town the roads seem to be more open. There are generally no bad signs on the Alamo and Laguna reservations.

I have ridden a lot on the main Navajo rez. There are no signs and nobody has bothered me. But I have also heard that you are supposed to get a permit to ride there. I have also heard that this isn't true.

But as others have noted there are lots of forest and BLM roads available within 100 miles of town.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:09 AM   #8
TNC
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Other than the prohibitions posted in the more urban locations like the Taos pueblo and such, I only see camping prohibitions occasionally posted in most of the Indian land areas in UT, NM, AZ, and CO. Those more urban restrictions are kind of logical as most of those type areas are full of residential property. As you get away from those, it seems to me that most of the roads in Indian territories are a lot like the dirt roads anywhere else. There is probably less overall true off roading on Indian lands, but there is still lots of scenic riding out there. And though I mentioned camping prohibitions, it's not totally prohibited in all locations either.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:19 AM   #9
shoco OP
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Thanks for the info.

I will give it a shot and see what happens. All I'm looking to do is ride through quietly and enjoy the scenery, specifically on the Isleta Pueblo.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:26 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by shoco View Post
Thanks for the info.

I will give it a shot and see what happens. All I'm looking to do is ride through quietly and enjoy the scenery, specifically on the Isleta Pueblo.
In this area, if So. Ute catches you on their roads, they can impound your vehicle and throw you in the clink. And definitely not all roads are marked, so it's tricky. Some of the roads have an old 'no trespassing' sign that was fresh 15 or 20 years ago, but by now all the writing has faded off.

If I had an $$$ bike, I'd be more careful. Good thing I have a chitty DRZ.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:37 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Kitteh View Post
In this area, if So. Ute catches you on their roads, they can impound your vehicle and throw you in the clink. And definitely not all roads are marked, so it's tricky. Some of the roads have an old 'no trespassing' sign that was fresh 15 or 20 years ago, but by now all the writing has faded off.

If I had an $$$ bike, I'd be more careful. Good thing I have a chitty DRZ.
Well that's some sorry BS...and not saying that to claim your info isn't correct. If their signage and/or lack of gates is that bad, latching on to someone and their vehicle almost sounds like a criminal enterprise on the part of those authorities. While I understand the principal of Indian land and a level of autonomy, this ain't Mexico. Maybe it's time for another cowboys and indians scenario.
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:39 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNC View Post
Well that's some sorry BS...and not saying that to claim your info isn't correct. If their signage and/or lack of gates is that bad, latching on to someone and their vehicle almost sounds like a criminal enterprise on the part of those authorities. While I understand the principal of Indian land and a level of autonomy, this ain't Mexico. Maybe it's time for another cowboys and indians scenario.
Take that to tribal court and see how far you get.

The best advice is that you just stay away from their land, that includes Casinos.
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Old 09-06-2013, 10:58 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Hair View Post

The best advice is that you just stay away from their land, that includes Casinos.
I wouldn't go that far. There are some very scenic public roads that go through Indian Country. Old Marquez Road comes to mind. The ride from Cabezon through Counselor to the San Juan is another that goes through the checkerboard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdsnitc View Post
There are plenty that you can explorer...

The rules I follow:
  • Respect the signs
  • Respect Locked Gates
  • Leave an Unlocked Gate the way you found it
  • Dont go through an obviously cut fence
  • Be nice, wave to the locals
  • Stay on established roads

Haven't had any trouble yet.
This.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNC View Post
Well that's some sorry BS...and not saying that to claim your info isn't correct. If their signage and/or lack of gates is that bad, latching on to someone and their vehicle almost sounds like a criminal enterprise on the part of those authorities. While I understand the principal of Indian land and a level of autonomy, this ain't Mexico. Maybe it's time for another cowboys and indians scenario.
Sorry to say, but the whole "it wasn't signed properly" argument is likely to make things worse depending on who specifically you are talking to. "I'm sorry, what can I do to make it right?" goes a lot further. Indian roads are a very complex area of law, and the public resources to do the research are difficult to access. There are certain roads paid for with certain federal dollars that are supposed to be public. That's not always the case, though. There are others that could be closed but are not. Some pueblos won't even let you leave the highway (e.g., main entrance to Santa Ana between the casino and the Zia Pueblo). There are other Indian-owned roads that are former BLM but were bought by a tribe and technically have public easements, but are fenced off.

Then there's the ranchers...

What is supposed to be and what is are two very different things in the sticks of NM.
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:13 AM   #14
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The Pueblos in NM can impound your bike. It's happened a few times that I'm aware of. In most cases, the bike is returned but only after going to Tribal Court. As a precaution, carry all documents to prove you own the bike. Always respect the Tribal Lands as the Natives view their land much differently than most citizens do. Remember, Tribes are Sovereign Nations and they make up their own rules, so just be cautious and respectful. AND stay on established roads/trails.

I'm not sure why you'd want to ride Isleta Lands--the scenery is average. There are many places outside Pueblos to ride in NM that are much, much more scenic. However, if you do want to visit Isleta, go to the Pueblo, it has one of the oldest churches in the US (over 400 years old). It's cool to see. Most Pueblo structures are old throughout Native Country (it part of the heritage), so be mindful of what and who you’re surrounded by. The Isleta’s people are very open armed. If you happen to go around feast time (which occurs in the fall) the Tribes People will gladly feed you some of the best homemade New Mexican food. The tribes have major ceremonies during the period too, so you’ll get to see the costumes/dancing etc (only those ceremonies open to public).

Finally, its the beginning of hunting season in NM. I believe it's limited to bow, but not 100% certain. If you intend on riding in remote areas, check with the NM Game and Fish to see what sections are currently active for hunts.

NM is an awesome place to ride---lots to see within 20min in any direction.

Almost forgot, as another posters mentioned, be very respectful towards ranchers on BLM land. They have a tendency to have the old west mentality. Shoot first and ask questions later.
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:37 AM   #15
shoco OP
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On second thought, I think I'll just stay away. Won't be a relaxing ride if I'm worrying about the law the entire time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UNO_RIDER View Post
I'm not sure why you'd want to ride Isleta Lands--the scenery is average. There are many places outside Pueblos to ride in NM that are much, much more scenic.
I'm just trying to map out some loops from Albuquerque that are off the beaten path, and have some forest roads mixed in. One of the loops I mapped took me south on 47, then east through Isleta tribal roads, then meeting up with 337. Instead, I'll bypass the tribal roads by going all the way down to the 60 and cutting across there.

I'm on an XT250, so I don't like to ride freeways for more than 5-10 miles. It's just not comfortable.

If anyone has ride suggestions, I'm all ears. Thanks again for the info.
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