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Old 10-27-2013, 10:39 AM   #136
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Chattooga County, Summerville, ga

Side shot


Front view




Other Information: Chattooga County's first courthouse was a two-story structure built in 1840 (see photo). The building continued in use until the present courthouse was built in 1909.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here

County History: Chattooga County was created on Dec. 28, 1838 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1838, p. 77). Created from Walker and Floyd counties, Chattooga County's original boundaries were defined by law as:

. . . beginning on the Alabama line, at the corner of the 12th and 13th districts of the fourth section, and running thence east on said district line to the north east corner of the twenty-fifth district and third section, thence south on the district line to the south east corner of the same district, thence west of the district line to the north west corner of lot number five, in the 24th district of the third section, thence on a direct line to be run by the Surveyor for the county of Floyd, by the way of the south west corner of the fifth district and fourth section.

Georgia's 93rd county was named for the Chattooga River that flows through the county. [Georgia has two different Chattooga rivers, with the second forming the eastern border of Rabun County in extreme northeastern Georgia.] "Chattooga" is a Cherokee word of debated origin and definition.

Between 1840 and 1856, the General Assembly transferred land between Chattooga and Floyd counties on ten occasions.
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Old 10-27-2013, 10:46 AM   #137
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Walker County, LaFayette, GA



Pano




Other Information: Walker County's first courthouse was built in LaFayette in 1838. When that structure burned in 1883, a new two-story brick courthouse was built (see photo). That structure served until the present courthouse was built in 1919 (see early photo).

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here

County History: Walker County was created from Murray County on Dec. 18, 1833, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1833, p. 52). According to that act:

That the county of Murray, in this State, shall hereafter constitute and be divided into two counties, to be bounded as follows: -- commencing at the point where the counties of Floyd and Cass join on the south side of the present county of Murray, following the dividing line of the two ranges of districts, separated by a line running north from the point above designated, until the said north line intersects the line of the State of Tennessee; and that portion of said county, lying on the east side of the above-mentioned line, shall constitute a county, and continue to be called Murray. And all that portion of said county, as at present organized, lying on the west side of said north line, shall constitute a new county to be called Walker, in honor of the late Freeman Walker, of Richmond.

Georgia's 90th county was named for former U.S. senator Freeman Walker(1780-1827), an Augusta attorney who served in the U.S. Senate from 1819 to 1821.

In 1837, Dade County was created entirely from Walker County (Ga. Laws 1837, p. 65). Also, portions of Walker County were used to create Chattooga County (1838) and Catoosa County (1853).
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Old 10-27-2013, 02:38 PM   #138
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Allright PP! Looks like you were able to get out and ride today! Those are some fine looking courthouses. Do appreciate the effort!

I was explaining to my wife's cousin about the courthouse thread and she patted me on the back and said "Oh, that's nice.".
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Old 10-27-2013, 02:40 PM   #139
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That's the response I get when I try to explain this or the tag-a-Rama games.
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Old 10-27-2013, 03:38 PM   #140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PoodlePumper View Post
That's the response I get when I try to explain this or the tag-a-Rama games.
I had to take the gang to Juliet for their annul fall festival and while I was there, I snagged this courthouse.

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Old 10-27-2013, 03:41 PM   #141
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Nice! I was hoping one of my grabs today would be like that. Maybe there's one mixed in the remaining few.

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Old 10-31-2013, 06:18 AM   #142
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Irwin County, Ocilla GA









Date Built: 1910

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Unknown

Other Information: On Dec. 21, 1819, a year after Irwin County's creation, the legislature authorized the county's inferior court to erect a courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 65). Until a courthouse was built, the legislation provided that superior and inferior courts be held at the house of David Williams. It is not clear what served as Irwin County's courthouse for the next two decades. Georgia maps published in 1822 and 1823 show a site in northern Irwin County marked "C.H." -- which was the common abbreviation for "courthouse." Irwin County's first official courthouse was built in Irwinville -- reportedly in 1839. This building was replaced in 1854. A new courthouse (see photo) was built in 1883 and served until the present courthouse was completed in 1910 (see photo 1 and photo 2) following the designation of Ocilla as new county seat. A number of changes were made to the courthouse as part of a major renovation in 1972.

County History: Irwin County was one of seven counties created on Dec. 15, 1818, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1818, p. 27). [Click here for a legal description of Irwin County's original boundaries.] Irwin, Appling, and Early counties extended across south Georgia and were created from Creek lands acquired in 1814 by the Treaty of Fort Jackson.

Irwin, Appling, and Early counties were organized by an act of Dec. 21, 1819, which provided for election of county officials in each county.

From 1825 to 1906, portions of Irwin Counties original boundaries were used to create the following counties: Lowndes and Thomas (1825), Worth (1853), Coffee (1854), Berrien (1856), Wilcox (1857), Tift and Turner (1905), and Ben Hill (1906).

Georgia's 41st county was named for former Georgia governor Jared Irwin (1750-1818). [For more information on Jared Irwin, click here .]

County Seat: The Dec. 21, 1819 act organizing Irwin County authorized the five justices of the county's first inferior court to select the location of the county's seat of government, which was to be "as near the centre thereof as convenience will admit" (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 65). Until a county seat was selected and a courthouse built, county courts were to meet in the home of David Williams. Irwin County's inferior court was unable to decide on where the county seat should be located, so on Dec. 21, 1820, the legislature authorized the inferior court to select a temporary county seat until a permanent one could be designated (Ga. Laws 1820, p. 28). What happened next is unclear. Maps of Georgia published in 1822 and 1823 show a site in north Irwin County marked "C.H." -- which indicates the location of the courthouse. However, Irwin County did not yet have an official county seat. On Dec. 13, 1823, the legislature vested William Foulsom, James Crum, Sellaway McCall, Joshua Griffin, and Alexander McDaniel as courthouse and jail commissioners with the authority formerly delegated to the inferior court (Ga. Laws 1823, p. 62).

On Dec. 24, 1825, the legislature authorized the five courthouse commissioners named above to also select a county seat for Irwin County and to purchase land, have lots laid off, and sell the lots (Ga. Laws 1825, p. 55). The act further provided that once a county site had been chosen, the inferior court was then responsible for contracting to have a courthouse and jail built. However, the commissioners could not agree on where to locate Irwin's county seat -- so on Dec. 19, 1827, the legislature appointed Cornelius Tison, Lott Whitten, Jonathan Smith, Miles Adams, James L. Wilcox, Ludd Mobly, and Jacob Paulk as new commissioners to select a county seat (Ga. Laws 1827, p. 187).

On Dec. 23, 1830, the legislature finally stepped in and designated the location of Irwin County's seat of government as land lot 225 in the fourth district of the county (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 216). If that lot could not be purchased, the act authorized the purchase of any lot within two miles of lot 225 for use as the county seat. The legislature also directed that the county seat be named Irwinsville.

For whatever reason, the legislature on Dec. 22, 1831 changed the location of Irwin's county seat to land lot 39 in the third district, though again directing that it be named Irwinsville (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 81). The act named Robert H. Dixon, Jacob Young, William Bradford, Daniel Look, and Reuben Marsh as commissioners with authority to lay out and sell town lots and to contract for building a courthouse and jail. On Dec. 22, 1857, the legislature incorporated Irwin County's seat of government as "Irwinville" -- and not "Irwinsville" as directed in the 1830 and 1831 acts (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 179).

Around 1880, a community named Ocilla developed around 10 miles southeast of Irwinville. (The name Ocilla was of Creek origin, believed to be the name of an Indian town or chief.) Built around timber and turpentine, Ocilla grew rapidly after a railroad from Fitzgerald was completed in 1897. That same year, the legislature incorporated Ocilla on Nov. 24 (Ga. Laws 1897, p. 282).

Soon afterwards, the railroad was extended southward, connecting Ocilla to major railroads. Within 10 years, the town's population tripled. Meanwhile, Irwinville declined as residents and businesses moved to Ocilla and Fitzgerald.

On April 29, 1907, a petition to change the county seat from Irwinville to Ocilla signed by two-fifths of the voters of Irwin County was submitted to the county ordinary (probate judge). That same day, the ordinary directed that an election be held on June 12, 1907. In that election, over two-thirds of the vote supported removal of the county seat, so on Aug. 19, 1907, the legislature designated Ocilla as the new county seat of Irwin County (Ga. Laws 1907, p. 307). A new courthouse in Ocilla was not completed until 1910, so Irvinville may have continued as de facto county seat from 1907 to 1910 due to the fact that the county courthouse was located there.

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Old 10-31-2013, 06:20 AM   #143
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Ben Hill County, Fitzgerald GA







Date Built: 1909

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: H.H. Huggins

Other Information: Ben Hill County's first and only courthouse was built in 1909. Originally, it had a domed clock tower rising from the center of the building (see postcard). When the courthouse was renovated in the early 1950s, the clock tower was removed.

County History: On July 31, 1906, the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Ben Hill County (Ga. Laws 1906, p. 28). In that year's general election, voters ratified the constitutional amendment on Nov. 6, 1906, which is considered the date of Ben Hill County's creation (even though a state historical marker on the courthouse square incorrectly cites the date of the legislature's proposal of the amendment as the date of the county's creation). Georgia's 146th county was named for former Confederate and U.S. Senator Benjamin Hill (1823-1882).

Why was Ben Hill County created by constitutional amendment instead of an act of the General Assembly? In 1904, Georgia voters had approved a constitutional amendment limiting the number of counties in the state to 145. The next year, the General Assembly created eight new counties, bringing the total number to 145 -- the constitutional limit. Nevertheless, there was continuing pressure to create more counties. In 1906, lawmakers sought to create a new county from portions of Wilcox and Irwin counties. Because an act of the legislature cannot conflict with the state constitution, the only option was to amend the state constitution. The legislature could have proposed an amendment that raised the constitutional limit to 146 counties. For whatever reason, supporters of the new county chose another approach. Leave the 145-limit in the constitution and simply add an additional provision that said: "Provided, however, That in addition to the counties now provided for by this Constitution there shall be a new county laid out from the counties of Irwin and Wilcox, bounded as follows . . . ." Thus began the practice in Georgia of creating new counties by constitutional amendment. By 1924, Georgia had 161 counties -- 16 of which had been created by constitutional amendment. On Jan. 1, 1932, Milton and Campbell counties merged with Fulton, leaving 159 counties. In 1945, Georgia voters ratified a new constitution -- one which provided an absolute limit of 159 counties, with an additional provision (see text) that no new country could be created except through consolidation of existing counties.

As an interesting note, Ben Hill is one of 25 Georgia counties that today still have the original boundaries provided at the time of creation.

County Seat: The proposed constitutional amendment creating Ben Hill County specified Fitzgerald as the county seat. Fitzgerald was settled in 1895 as a colony for former Union soldiers and was named for Indianapolis, Ind. newspaper editor P. H. Fitzgerald, who was the guiding force behind creation of the colony. In an act of Dec. 2, 1896, the General Assembly incorporated the new colony as a city (Ga. Laws 1896, p. 157).

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Old 11-03-2013, 01:08 PM   #144
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Towns County - Hiawassee, GA







Location: Hiawassee

Date Built: 1964

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: Henry M. Whitehead, Jr.

Other Information: Towns County's first courthouse reportedly was built in the Hiawassee town square in 1857. The building served until 1905, when a new courthouse was completed. The present courthouse was erected in 1964.

County History: Towns County was created Rabun and Union counties on March 6, 1856, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 121). According to that act, Towns County's original boundaries were specified as:

Beginning at the North Carolina line at the north-west corner of Rabun county, and thence running east with said line to the north-east corner of lot of land number ninety-four in the first district of Rabun county, thence running south to the south-east corner of lot number sixty-seven in the said first district, thence running a straight line to the south-east corner of lot of land number one hundred and seventy-two in the eighteenth district and first section of Union county, thence along the top of the Blue Ridge south-westerly to the corner of Habersham county, thence along the top of said Blue Ridge to the main Ridge that divides the waters of Notley and Hiwassee rivers, thence along the top of said Ridge, westerly, to the Brass town, Bald mountain, thence in the same direction to the Double Knobbs, thence to the highest point of a Ridge on lot number one hundred and ninety-one, (191) in the seventeenth district and first section, thence a straight line to the Gap of the Mountain at the head of Langham's Creek, thence with the main leading Ridge in a north-western direction to the highest peak of the mountain, at the head of Gum Log Creek, thence down said Gum Log Creek to the North Carolina line, thence along the dividing line between North Carolina and Georgia to the beginning point.

Georgia's 118th county was named for Gov. George Washington Towns (1801-1854), who had died two years earlier.

County Seat: The act creating Towns County called for county elections on the first Monday in April 1856. After that election, the justices of the county's new inferior court were authorized to select a site for the county seat, purchase land, lay the site off into town lots, sell the lots, and make all arrangements for the county seat and public buildings as necessary. It is not clear when the inferior court selected a county seat, though the first courthouse reportedly was built in Hiawasee in 1857. The exact date the inferior court selected Hiawassee as county seat is not known. The General Assembly incorporated Hiawassee as a town on Oct. 24, 1870 (Ga. Laws 1870, p. 204).
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:40 PM   #145
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Habersham County - Clarkesville, GA







Location: Clarkesville

Date Built: 1964

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: David Cuttino, Jr.

Other Information: Habersham County's first courthouse was a small wooden structure built in 1821 in the town square of Clarkesville. In 1832, this building was moved to the side of the square (where it became a bank), and its place a new two-story brick courthouse of simple design was constructed . This building served until 1898, when it was damaged by a mysterious explosion. That same year, the old courthouse was torn down and a large two-story brick courthouse with clock tower constructed in its place. In 1963, this courthouse was torn down, and Habersham's fourth and current courthouse was built the following year in an adjacent block. A combination bell tower/elevator was added to the front of the courthouse in 1983.

County History: Habersham County was created on Dec. 15, 1818, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1818, p. 27). That legislation also created Gwinnett and Hall counties -- all from lands ceded by the Cherokee Indians on July 8, 1817 in the Treaty of the Cherokee Agency. Additional Cherokee lands were ceded to Georgia on Feb. 27, 1819 in the Treaty of Washington, and in an act of Dec. 21, 1819, the legislature added some of ceded land to the western portions of Habersham and Hall counties (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 23). Remaining unallocated Cherokee lands ceded in 1817 and 1819 were added to Habersham and other Georgia counties in 1828 and 1829 (Ga. Laws 1828, p. 88 and Ga. Laws 1829, p. 98). (Later, portions of Habersham County were used to create the following counties: Cherokee (1831), Lumpkin (1832), White (1857), Banks (1858), and Stephens (1905).

Georgia's 46th county was named for Joseph Habersham (1751-1815) of Savannah. Habersham was a leader in the independence movement in Georgia prior to the American Revolution.After the war, Habersham served as U.S. Postmaster General (1795-1801). Prior to his death, Habersham built a summer home near present-day Clarkesville. When the area became a county in 1818, it was named in honor of the famous Georgia political figure.

County Seat: On Nov. 26, 1823, the General Assembly enacted legislation designating directing "parts of lots number two and nineteen, in the tenth and twelfth districts in said county, at a place now known and called by the name of Clarkesville" as the permanent county seat of Habersham County (Ga. Laws 1823, p. 176). The same legislation incorporated the county seat as a village. Clarkesville began as a small settlement sometime prior to 1820 and took on its name during the administration of Gov. John C. Clark (1819-1823). Clark (1776-1832) was the son of Gen. Elijah Clarke, for whom Clarke County was named.
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:48 PM   #146
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Rabun County, Clayton GA







Location: Clayton

Date Built: 1967

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: John H. Harte Associates

Other Information: The 1819 act organizing Rabun County authorized the justices of the county's first inferior court to select a site for the county seat, to purchase land, and to provide for construction of a courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 112). Until this was done, the act directed that courts and elections be conducted at the house of Daniel Love. In 1823, the legislature moved the county seat from land lot 20 to lot 21 in the second district, and the county began laying out the town of Clayton, Sufficient lots were sold so that by 1824, the county had raised enough money to construct Rabun County's first courthouse -- a two-story log building completed in 1824. That structure was replaced by a new two-story log courthouse in 1838. In 1878, the courthouse walls and floor began to collapse, so the superior court judge closed the courthouse and directed that court be held in the nearby Masonic Lodge. What served as courthouse for the following 30 years is unclear, but in 1908 a new two-story brick or stone courthouse with central clock tower was constructed. This building served until 1967, when a new one-story courthouse of modern design was completed. More recently, a second floor, new entrance, and a cupola were added to the 1967 structure.

County History: In the Treaty of Washington signed Feb. 27, 1819, the Cherokees ceded a large area of extreme northeast Georgia. In an act of Dec. 21, 1819, the General Assembly used this cession to create Rabun County, as well as transfer some of the land to Hall and Habersham counties (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 23). [Note: In the official compiliation of 1819 session laws , the act's approval date is listed as Dec. 16, 1819. However, the enrolled copy of the act in the Georgia State Archives indicates that the act was approved on Dec. 21.]

According to the act creating Rabun County:

"That all that part of the [ceded] territory aforesaid, which lies in the fork of the Chatahoochee and Chestatee rivers, and south-west of a line beginning on the Chatahoochee river, where the line dividing the counties of Hall and Habersham corners on the same, and running thence a due west course, until the same strikes the Chestatee river, be added to and become part of Hall county, and that the same be laid out into three districts, as nearly equal as practicable; and that all of the said territory which lies north-east of the before cited line, and north-west of the Chatahoochee and Blair's line, until the same strikes the top of the Blue Ridge, be, and the same is hereby added to, and become part of Habersham county, which shall be laid out into six districts, as nearly equal as practicable; and all the balance of the said territory shall form one county, to be called and known by the name of Rabun, and be laid off into five districts, as nearly equal as practicable."

In an act of Dec. 21, 1819, the legislature organized Rabun County and provided for election of county officials (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 112).

In 1828, the legislature transferred a portion of Habersham County to Rabun County (Ga. 1828, p. 58). According to that legislation:

". . . so much of the county of Hahersham, as lies north and east of a line, beginning near the upper end of the Falls, on Talloola river, at the corner of fraction, number one hundred and eighty three, in the thirteenth district of said county of Habersham, thence the ridge a north west direction, dividing the waters of said river Talloola, and the waters of Panther creek, Deep creek, and Leuque creek, until said dividing ridge intersects, or strikes what is called Blairs line, thence on said Blairs line, until the same strikes Wild Cat creek, the line dividing Rabun from Habersham county, the same being a part of the thirteenth district of Habersham county, be added to, and become a part of the county of Rabun."

In 1838, the legislature redefined the Rabun-Habersham county line (Ga. Laws 1838, p. 80). In 1856, the legislature used portions of Rabun and Union counties to create Towns County (Ga. Laws 1856, p. 121).

Georgia's 47th county was named for Gov. William Rabun (1771-1819), who had died in office two months earlier.

County Seat: The legislation creating Rabun County authorized the justices of the county's first inferior court to select the site of the county seat. However, on Dec. 15, 1821, the legislature designated land lot 20 in the second district as the county seat, named it Claytonsville, and incorporated it as a town (Ga. Laws. 1821, p. 32). Subsequently, some citizens of Rabun County petitioned the General Assembly to change the location of the county seat, so in an act of Dec. 13, 1823, the legislature changed the county seat to land lot 21, named it Clayton, and incorporated it as a town (Ga. Laws 1823, p. 196). The county purchased 67 acres in land lot 21 from Solomon Beck and proceeded to lay out the town of Clayton.
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Old 11-03-2013, 04:03 PM   #147
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Wilkinson County - Irwinton GA







Location: Irwinton

Date Built: 1924

Architectural Style: Colonial Revival

Designer: Alexander Blair

Other Information: In an act of Dec. 10, 1807, the General Assembly provided that house of Willis Anderson serve as temporary courthouse of Wilkinson County until a courthouse could be built (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). In 1809, the legislature named Stephen Johnson, John Eady, Sr., Elkanah Lofton, Philip Pitman, and William Crawley as commissioners to select a county seat, purchase land, lay it off into town lots, sell the lots, and use the proceeds to construct a courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1809, p. 75). Apparently nothing happed, so two years later the legislature named John Proctor, Robert Barnett, John Speight, John Ball, and Daniel Hicks as commissioners to construct a courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1811, p. 123). Until this was done, the legislation directed that a temporary courthouse be built on land lot 83 in the 4th district. By 1817, Wilkinson County apparently had a courthouse, for the legislature designated the town boundaries of Irwinton as all areas falling within 400 yards of the courthouse (Ga. Laws 1817, p. 65). In 1818, the General Assembly authorized a special tax to be levied in Wilkinson County for the purpose of building a courthouse (Ga. Laws 1818, p. 25). It is not clear whether a new courthouse was built utilizing this tax. A courthouse built in 1829 burned down that same year. At some date, a new courthouse was built -- but in 1854 it too was destroyed by fire. A new courthouse built before the Civil War was burned by Sherman's troops in 1864. At an unknown date, another courthouse was built--but it burned in 1924, with the present courthouse built in its place the same year.

County History: On June 16, 1802, the Creek Indians and U.S. commissioners signed the Treaty of Fort Wilkinson, which ceded Creek lands in two different areas to Georgia. The northern cession involved land west of the Oconee River, which the legislature divided into two new counties -- Wilkinson and Baldwin -- on May 11, 1803 (Ga. Laws 1803 Extra. Ses., p. 3).

In 1805, the Creeks signed the Treaty of Washington, which extended Georgia westward to the Ocmulgee River. An act of June 26, 1806 added lands ceded by the Creeks to Baldwin and Wilkinson counties (Ga. Laws 1806 Extra. Ses., p. 3). In an act of Dec. 10, 1807, Laurens and Telfair counties were created entirely from Wilkinson County (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). In an act of Dec. 14, 1809, Twiggs County was created entirely from Wilkinson County (Ga. Laws 1809, p. 75).

Georgia's 28th county was named for Gen. James B. Wilkinson (1757-1825), one of the U.S. commissioners who negotiated the Treaty of Fort Wilkinson, in which the Creeks ceded the land that would be used to form Wilkinson County. Gen. Wilkinson, who served in the American Revolution and War of 1812, was the first governor of the Louisiana Territory (1805-1807).

County Seat: The 1803 act creating Wilkinson County made no provision for a county seat. In 1805, the General Assembly authorized the justices of the county's inferior court to select "some convenient place, as nearly central as circumstances will admit" for the courts to meet (Ga. Laws 1805, p. 51). No action was taken, so the legislature in 1807 directed that Wilkinson County courts and public business take place at the house of Willis Anderson (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). The next year, the General Assembly named Arthur Fort, John Hays, William Biven, Elkanah Loftin, and Jesse Brown as commissions to select the county seat of Wilkinson County, provided that their choice was within two miles of the center of the county (Ga. Laws 1808, p. 70). Until a county seat was designated and courthouse built, the 1808 act directed that Willis Anderson's house continue to serve as temporary courthouse. In 1809, the legislature appointed Stephen Johnson, John Eady, Sr., Elkanah Lofton, Philip Pitman, and William Crawley as new commissioners to select a county seat, purchase between 100 and 202.5 acres of land, and lay off and sell town lots (Ga. Laws 1809, p. 75). Finally, in 1811, the legislature directed that the county seat be located on land lot 83 in the 4th district and be known as Irwinton (Ga. Laws 1811, p. 123). Incorporated by an act of Dec. 4, 1816 (Ga. Laws 1816, p. 72), Irwinton was named for Jared Irwin (1751-1818), who served as Georgia governor for three terms (1796-1798 and 1806-1809).

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Old 11-03-2013, 04:15 PM   #148
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Baldwin County - Milledgeville GA




They don't have a plaque, we looked every where and could not find it. I figured I would just use the picture on the Georgia info site but it says there isn't one, guess that's why we couldn't find it. This plaque is there so it will have to do.





Location: Milledgeville

Date Built: 1995-97

Architectural Style:

Designer: Brittain, Thompson, Bray & Brown

Other Information: Baldwin County's first courthouse was a log cabin owned by George Hill in the settlement of Hillsborough. Here, the first court session was held on June 26, 1806. In Dec. 1807, the legislature created four new counties from Baldwin, with Hillsborough transferred to newly created Randolph (later renamed Jasper) County. At the same session, the legislature designated Milledgeville as the new county seat of Baldwin County and authorized county court sessions to be held in the state capitol. On Dec. 22, 1808, the General Assembly authorized Baldwin County to levy a tax to build a courthouse on the southeast corner of Penetentiary Square. Until the courthouse could be erected, county court sessions were to be held in a rented house. Baldwin County's first real courthouse was completed in 1814 at a cost of $3,975. This building was used until replaced by a larger courthouse built on the same site in 1847. This courthouse burned in 1861, after which court sessions were held in the Georgia Capitol, the Milledgeville Opera House, and the local Masonic Hall. In 1883, the legislature authorized Baldwin County to borrow up to $25,000 to build four fireproof county offices, as well as a courthouse, on the site of the former courthouse. In 1885, work began on the new courthouse, which was completed in 1887 (see photo). This courthouse was remodeled in 1937 and 1965. In 1990, planning began on a new courthouse. After local option sales tax referendums were approved in 1990 and 1992, construction of a new courthouse began in 1995 and was completed in 1997.

County History: In 1802, the Creek Indians and U.S. commissioners signed the Treaty of Fort Wilkinson, which ceded Creek lands in two different areas to Georgia. The northern cession involved land west of the Oconee River, which the legislature divided into two new counties -- Baldwin and Wilkinson -- on May 11, 1803. Georgia's 29th county was named for Abraham Baldwin, one of Georgia's two signers of the U.S. Constitution and founder of the University of Georgia. In 1805, the Creeks signed the Treaty of Washington, which extended Georgia westward to the Ocmulgee River. An act of June 26, 1806 added lands ceded by the Creeks to Baldwin and Wilkinson counties. On Dec. 10, 1807, the legislature divided Baldwin County into four new counties -- Morgan, Jones, Putnam, and Randolph (which was renamed Jasper). In the same act, Baldwin County was given land east of the Oconee River from Hancock and Washington counties.

County Seat: In June 1806, the Baldwin County's first court session was held in a log cabin in Hillsborough (a small settlement today located in Jasper County about 25 miles northwest of Milledgeville). In Dec. 1807, the legislature formed four new counties from portions of Baldwin County. The same month, the legislature designated Milledgeville county seat, since Hillsborough was now part of newly created Randolph County (later renamed Jasper County). Milledgeville was laid out to be Georgia's new state capital and first settled in 1803. Incorporated as a town on Dec. 8, 1806, Milledgeville as named for former governor John Milledge (1757-1818).
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Old 11-03-2013, 04:32 PM   #149
GAVic
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Putnam County - Eatonton, GA

Renovating, this is the back actually, but it 's a better view.


Here is the front, that big ass tree makes it hard to get a good shot.







Location: Eatonton

Date Built: 1905-06

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: J.W. Beeland, remodeled by J.W. Golucke

Other Information: This courthouse rests on one of the largest public squares in Georgia. The oldest portion of the building was constructed in 1824. It has been extensively remodeled, with square brick columns along the facade and an ornate, beautiful clock tower. The final remodeling was completed in 1906

County History: Putnam County was created from Baldwin County on Dec. 10, 1807 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). No counties have been created from Putnam County. Georgia's 33rd county was named for American Revolutionary War general Israel Putnam.

County Seat: Eatonton [named for Connecticut general William Eaton; designated county seat 1808; incorporated Dec. 12, 1809].
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:15 PM   #150
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Thanks for the effort Mike. I would have snagged Putnam but when I saw the scaffolding, I decide to save it for when the repair was done. Hail damage is the reason for the repair work.
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