ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Regional forums > Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-04-2013, 06:28 AM   #151
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Wheeler County, Alamo GA







Location: Alamo

Date Built: 1917

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Frank P. Milburn

Other Information: It is not known what served as Wheeler County courthouse for the first two years following its creation, but in 1914 a courthouse was built in Alamo. This structure burned in 1916. The present courthouse was built in 1917 and completely renovated in 1961.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here

County History: On Aug. 14, 1912, the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Wheeler County from that portion of Montgomery County west of the Oconee River (see map). (Ga. Laws 1912, p. 41). In that year's general election, Georgia voters ratified the proposed amendment on Nov. 5, 1912, which marks the official date of Wheeler County's creation (although a state historical marker on the courthouse grounds incorrectly cites the county's creation as the day the legislative act proposing the constitutional amendment was approved).

Why was Wheeler County created by constitutional amendment instead of an act of the General Assembly? In 1904, Georgia voters had approved a constitutional amendment limiting the number of counties in the state to 145. The next year, the General Assembly created eight new counties, bringing the total number to 145 -- the constitutional limit. Nevertheless, there was continuing pressure to create more counties. Beginning in 1906, lawmakers got around the 145-county limitation by creating new counties through constitutional amendments that were not subject to the limitation. By 1924, Georgia had 161 counties -- 16 of which had been created by constitutional amendment. On Jan. 1, 1932, Milton and Campbell counties merged with Fulton, leaving 159 counties. In 1945, Georgia voters ratified a new constitution -- one which provided an absolute limit of 159 counties, with an additional provision (see text) that no new country could be created except through consolidation of existing counties.

Georgia's 148th county was named for former Confederate general Joseph E. Wheeler.

County Seat: The 1912 constitutional amendment creating Wheeler County designated the town of Alamo as county seat. Alamo had developed around 1890 as a railroad depot on the new Seaboard Air Line Railway (see map). Kenneth Krakow indicates that the daughter of a local judge suggested the name of the town after the San Antonio mission destroyed by Mexican forces in 1836. The legislature incorporated Alamo on Aug. 16, 1909 (Ga. Laws 1909, p. 498).
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:31 AM   #152
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Toombs County, Lyons GA







Location: Lyons

Date Built: 1964

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: W.P. Thompson, Jr.

Other Information: Toombs County's first courthouse was a brick structure built in 1906 (see postcard). The building was destroyed by fire in 1917 and rebuilt in 1919. The present courthouse was built several blocks from downtown in 1964.

County History: Toombs County was created on Aug. 18, 1905, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1905, p. 62). Formed from portions of Emanuel, Montgomery, and Tattnall counties, Georgia's 144th county was named for famous politician and unreconstructed secessionist Gen. Robert Toombs.

County Seat: The law creating Toombs County provided that Lyons be the county seat. The town was settled in the 1880s or 1890s and became a railroad stop on the Central of Georgia line connecting Albany with Savannah. The town was named for a Mr. Lyons, who reportedly was instrumental in getting the railroad built through the town. Lyons was incorporated by an act of the legislature approved Dec. 9, 1897.
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:36 AM   #153
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Tattnall County, Reidsville GA







No Historical Marker

Location: Reidsville

Date Built: 1902

Architectural Style: Second Empire influence

Designer: J.W. Golucke

Other Information: When created in 1801, Tattnall County had no towns, so the legislature provided that county business be conducted at the home of Zacharia Cox, whose home was located on the western boundary of the new county. In 1828, the General Assembly appointed a committee to select a central site in the county for location of a courthouse. In 1832, a U.S. post office opened in the small Tattnall community of Reidsville, and that year the legislature designated the community as county seat. The third building used as a courthouse was built in 1857 (see sketch). The current courthouse was built in 1902 (see photo soon after completion). It was remodeled in 1915 and again in the 1960s, at which time the tower and mansard roof were removed (see photos before and during renovation) . The courthouse was renovated again in 1991.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here


County History: Tattnall County was created from Montgomery County on Dec. 5, 1801 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1801, p. 88). Later, parts of Tattnall County were used to help create Toombs County (1905) and Candler and Evans counties (1914).

Georgia's 25th county was named for Josiah Tattnall, Jr., who played a prominent role in repealing the infamous Yazoo Act. In 1796, the General Assembly elected Tattnall to fill the term of U.S. senator James Jackson. At the end of that term in 1799, Tattnall returned to private life. However, on Nov. 7, 1801, the General Assembly elected him governor and immediately named a new county after him.

County Seat: Reidsville [named for Augusta superior court judge Robert Reid; designated county seat in 1832; incorporated Dec. 31, 1838].

jub jub screwed with this post 11-04-2013 at 02:09 PM
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:38 AM   #154
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Long County, Ludowici GA







Location: Ludowici

Date Built: 1926

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: G.M. Harrington

Other Information: Interior renovated in 1974.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here


County History:

On Aug. 14, 1920, the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Long County from Liberty County (Ga. Laws 1920, p. 48). In that year's general election, Georgia voters ratified the proposed amendment on Nov. 2, 1920, which marks the date of Long County's creation (although a state historical marker on the Long County courthouse grounds incorrectly cites the county's creation as the day the legislative act proposing the constitutional amendment was approved).

According to the 1920 constitutional amendment, Long County's boundaries (see map) were defined as:

Beginning at a point on the Altamaha River where the same is intersected by the county line between Liberty and McIntosh Counties; thence northeast and north along the aforesaid county line between McIntosh and Liberty to intersection thereof with South Newport River; and to the northwest corner of McIntosh County, at the point where said Liberty and McIntosh line is nearest the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad's main line; thence a straight line northwestward to the main line of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad at a point one-half mile southwest of said railroad's depot at Lambert, Georgia (Post Office) and Walthourville Station; thence due north a straight line to the Walthourville and Smiley public road, north of Lambert, Georgia; thence northwestward a straight line to a point in the Ludowici and Hinesville public road three hundred (300) yards north of the residence of W. H. Devereaux in the 1756th G. M. District of Liberty County; thence northwestward a straight line to a point on the Roderick and Hinesville public road where same is intersected by the Walthourville public road from the southeast; thence west along the center of said Roderick and Hinesville public road a short distance to where the Walthourville public road leaves same towards the northwest; thence northwestwards along the center of said Walthourville public road past Gum Branch Post Office, old site to intersection thereof, with the Savannah public road or Beards Bluff public road about one and one-eighth (1 1-8) miles east of the Cross Roads School House; thence west along the center of said Savannah public road or Beards Bluff public road to where said Walthourville public road leaves same going northwest; thence along the center of said Walthourville public road to intersection of same with the Moody Bridge public road; thence northwards along the center of said Moody Bridge public road to the point where same crosses the Savannah and Southern Railroad right of way at Strain on said railroad and to the north line of said right of way; thence westward along the north line of the Savannah and Southern Railroad right of way to the first public road crossing at Lida depot on said railroad; thence westward along center of public road from Lida past Bear Branch School House to forks of said public road; and thence along the center of the northwest fork thereof, in a northwesterly direction to where said public road crosses the Liberty and Tattnall County line nearby and east of Hampton School House; thence southwards and south along the county line between Liberty and Tattnall to the Altamaha River and to the line between Liberty and Wayne Counties; thence southeast along the channel of said Altamaha River and along the county line between Liberty and Wayne to point of beginning.

Why was Long County created by constitutional amendment instead of an act of the General Assembly? In 1904, Georgia voters had approved a constitutional amendment limiting the number of counties in the state to 145. The next year, the General Assembly created eight new counties, bringing the total number to 145 -- the constitutional limit. Nevertheless, there was continuing pressure to create more counties. Beginning in 1906, lawmakers got around the 145-county limitation by creating new counties through constitutional amendments that were not subject to the limitation. By 1924, Georgia had 161 counties -- 16 of which had been created by constitutional amendment. On Jan. 1, 1932, Milton and Campbell counties merged with Fulton, leaving 159 counties. In 1945, Georgia voters ratified a new constitution -- one which provided an absolute limit of 159 counties, with an additional provision (see text) that no new country could be created except through consolidation of existing counties.

Long County was named for Dr. Crawford Long, who in 1842 pioneered the use of anesthesia during surgery.

County Seat: Ludowici. The proposed constitutional amendment to create Long County provided that Ludowici serve as county seat. Incorporated in 1905, Ludowici was named for a German businessman who settled there and became successful manufacturing red clay roofing tiles.
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:41 AM   #155
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Wayne County, Jesup GA







Location: Jesup

Date Built: 1902-03

Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival

Designer: S.A. Baker

Other Information: Although Wayne County was created in 1803, it was not until 1829 that a site was selected for the county seat. Where superior and inferior courts met for the county's first 26 years of existence is not known. In fact, it appears that Wayne County did not have a permanent courthouse until one was built in 1860. According to Jordan and Puster, the county's first courthouse was a small wooden structure built in the woods nine miles northwest of Waynesville.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here


County History: Wayne County was created on May 11, 1803, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1803, Extra. Session, p. 3). Formed from land ceded to Georgia the previous year by the Creek Indians in the Treaty of Fort Wilkinson. Georgia's 27th county was named for American Revolutionary War hero General "Mad" Anthony Wayne. The new county was located in a region of the state known as the Pine Barrens (so-called because the land was barren of most large plants except pine trees), and the lack of fertile soil attracted few settlers. Wayne County was not organized until two years after its creation, and settlement of the county proceeded slowly. For example, an 1822 map of Georgia showed only two named settlements in the county -- Tuckersville and an abandoned Fort James on the Altamaha River.

In 1920, part of Wayne County was used to create Brantley County.

County Seat: A good deal of uncertainty clouds the story of Wayne County's seat of government for the first 50 years of the county's existence. Tuckersville reportedly served as the first county seat, and several different maps from the 1820s show Tuckersville as the most prominent town in Wayne County. One 1835 map of Georgia shows a new town -- Waynesville -- as the county seat. However, as late as 1838, most maps of Georgia showed Tuckersville as county seat. An 1851 map shows Waynesville as county seat, with Tuckersville omitted from the map. However, a map the following year included Waynesville but still showed Tuckersville as county seat. Maps of 1861 and 1862 clearly show Waynesville as county seat and as a depot on the Brunswick & Pensacola Railroad. A Georgia map of 1871 shows a new county seat -- Jesup -- located at the intersection of the Macon & Brunswick Railroad and the Savannah, Florida & Western Railroad.

Turning from maps to the legal story, in 1806, three years after Wayne County was created, the legislature passed an act naming commissioners to select a county seat. Apparently, the commissioners had difficulty living up to their responsibility, for in 1808, the legislature passed an act naming a new group of commissioners and directing that county courts and elections be held at the house of Capt. William Clements until a county seat was selected. In 1823, legislators named a new group of commissioners to select a county seat, which "shall be as near the centre of said county as convenience will permit, on the north side of the river Great Satilla. . . ." The next year, however, the legislature enacted new legislation directing that court sessions and elections for Wayne County be held "at the house of Wiley Robertson in the county of Wayne until suitable buildings are erected at the county site." In 1825, the legislature acted again, this time directing that the Wayne County courthouse "shall be located where the court-house stood near the Buffalo. . . " [This may be a reference to the Little Buffalo Swamp, which today is situated on the Wayne-Brantley boundary about 12 miles north of Waynesville; Buffalo Swamp in western Glynn County near the Wayne County line; or Buffalo Creek in southern Brantley County.]

Apparently, the commissioners named by the legislature in 1823 had decided to build the courthouse at a site near Wiley Robertson's home. For whatever reason, the legislature stepped in Dec. 1826 and passed an act directing the commissioners "to sell and dispose of the lumber and site which were got for the new courthouse at Wiley Robson's. . . ."

In Dec. 1829, the legislature provided that as of the first Monday in January 1830, "the site for the court house and public buildings for the county of Wayne, shall be established and made permanent on a four acre lot of land, given to the said county by William Clemants, Esq. for the purpose of establishing said court house and public buildings thereon, on the south side of said Clemants' mill branch, near where the court house road crosses the said branch about one mile from the Village of Waynesville, and about four miles from Ammons' ferry on Great Satilla River."

In 1832, Wayne County residents upset over the location of the county seat petitioned the legislature to take action. This time, lawmakers passed legislation directing Wayne County voters to elect commissioners for choosing a county seat. If it was possible to move the county seat, the commissioners were directed to determine where the center of the Wayne County was.

Finally in 1843, the General Assembly designated Waynesville as county seat. However, many Wayne County residents felt Waynesville was too far south, so they continued to call for a more centrally located location. In 1847, the legislature provided for election of commissioners to select a new county seat. The election was to take place in May 1848, with voting in the 134th district to take place "at the old court-house near the residence of James Rawlinson." The newly elected commissioners were to meet "at the residence of William Flowers, near the old ford of the Buffalo, and proceed to select and fix upon a place in the vicinity of the residence of the said Wm. Flowers as near the centre of the county as the public convenience will admit."

Apparently, this election of commissioners was never held, for in Feb. 1854 the General Assembly provided for the election of two commissioners from each militia district in Wayne County in April 1854. These commissioners were directed to select a site for erection of a courthouse. Then, on the first Saturday in May 1854, the commissioners would to meet at the house of "James Raulerson" and put construction of the courthouse out for bid.

In March 1856, the legislature passed an act that gave residents of Wayne County a voice in determining their county seat. A county-wide election would take place in April 1856. Voters would be given a ballot that indicated "Removal" or "No Removal." If they wanted Waynesville to continue as county seat they would vote against removal. However, if they wanted the county seat moved, they would vote for removal and then indicate what place they wanted it moved to.

According to the legislation calling for the referendum, Wayne County inferior court judges were directed to immediately take steps to purchase land and erect a courthouse and other public buildings. However, lack of funding caused a delay. So, in 1857, the General Assembly authorized Wayne County's inferior court to levy a special tax for two years to fund construction of the new courthouse. According to Jordan and Poster, a courthouse was finally built in the woods miles miles northwest of Waynesville in 1860.

After the Civil War, t. The new Macon & Brunswick Railroad crossed the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad at a point in the northern section of Wayne County. Here a train station serving two different railroads was built. A town quickly sprung up around the station and was named Jesup, in honor of U.S. Army Gen. Thomas Jesup (1788-1860), who gained fame during the Creek Indian War of 1836. By 1870, the legislature had incorporated the new town.

Jesup's growth led to a renewed call for designation of a new county seat. In Feb. 1873, the General Assembly called for a new election to determine the issue in March 1873. From the language of the Sec. II of the act, it appears that neither Jesup nor Waynesville were then serving as county seat:

Sec. II. That the voters voting at said election shall vote "no removal," or if in favor of removal shall designate by their ballots in the manner following, to-wit: "Removal, Jesup," "Removal. Waynesville," "Removal, Screven," their choice of the location of the new county site.

In the election, voters finally solved the long controversy by choosing Jesup as the permanent county seat for Wayne County.
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:43 AM   #156
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
McIntosh County, Darien GA







Location: Darien

Date Built: 1872

Architectural Style:

Designer: Unknown

Other Information: The first courthouse was built in 1800 and was used until 1864, when Union troops burned it down. The present courthouse was completed in 1872, was remodeled after a fire in 1931, and had several additions built around the original structure in 1973. In 1986, the courthouse was damaged by fire.

County History: McIntosh County was created from Liberty County on Dec. 19, 1793 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1793, p. 10). Georgia's 18th county was named for the McIntosh family -- particularly Capt. John McIntosh (who in 1736 led a group of Scot Highlanders in the settlement of Darien) and his son Gen. Lachlan McIntosh (who was a hero of the American Revolution).

County Seat: The first Europeans to occupy the locality were Spanish missionaries who settled the Santo Domingo de Talaje mission at or near the site of Darien near the mouth of the Altamaha River. In 1721, South Carolina built Fort King George at the site of Darien. However, sickness, climate, and biting insects led Carolina to abandon the fort in 1727. Three years after the arrival of the first Georgia colonists, a group of Highlanders (many from the county Inverness-shire, Scotland) settled the site as New Inverness. There, on the bank of a waterway, they built Fort Darien, named to honor a former Scottish colony in Panama named Darien (believed to be a mispronunciation of the Indian name, Tarena). Shortly after the fort was built, the name of the community was changed from New Inverness to Darien. When McIntosh County was created in 1793, Darien served as seat of county government. On Dec. 12, 1816, the General Assembly incorporated Darien as a town. Two years later, on Dec. 18, 1818, the legislature reincorporated Darien as a city and designated it permanent county seat of McIntosh County. In 1864, Union troops burned down the courthouse, and after the war a new home for county government was needed. Some McIntosh residents sought to have the county seat moved to a more central location, and in 1866 the General Assembly directed that an election be held. Each voter was entitled to indicated the site preferred for McIntosh county seat, with the site getting more votes than any other being selected. In the Jan. 1867 election, Darien polled more votes than any other site, so it remained as county seat.
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:46 AM   #157
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Ware County, Waycross GA







Location: Waycross

Date Built: 1957

Architectural Style: Modern with elements of Stripped Classical

Designer: William J.J. Chase & Associates

Other Information: Ware County's first courthouse was a log building at Waresborough (1825), the original county seat. A larger wooden building was erected and served as courthouse until the county seat moved to Waycross in 1873, where a small wooden structure was built. This building soon burned, and the older courthouse at Waresborough was taken apart and reconstructed in Waycross. A two-story brick courthouse with tower was built in 1891 [see postcard 1 and postcard 2]. This served as Ware County courthouse until the current building -- constructed of Georgia marble -- was completed in 1957.


County History: Ware County was established on Dec. 15, 1824 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1824, p. 44). Created from portions of Appling County, Georgia's 60th county was named for U.S. Sen. Nicholas Ware.

Portions of Ware County were used to create the following counties: Clinch (1850), Coffee (1854), Pierce (1857), and Bacon (1914).

County Seat: Waycross [first settled around 1820; became a railroad stop known as "Old Nine" or "Number Nine"; then known as Pendleton; renamed as Tebeauville in 1857; incorporated as Tebeauville in 1866; designated county seat in 1873; and incorporated as "Way Cross" (because it was the intersection of three railroads plus several dirt roads) March 3, 1874].

Previous county seat: Waresborough [designated county seat 1824; incorporated 1858; replaced as county seat 1873].
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 06:49 AM   #158
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Brantley County, Nahunta GA








Location: Nahunta

Date Built: 1930

Architectural Style: Colonial Revival elements

Designer: Unknown

Other Information: Hoboken was Brantley County's original county seat, and the county's first courthouse was built here in 1921 -- the year following its creation. In 1923, the legislature designated Nahunta as Brantley's new county seat. It is not clear what happened to the courthouse in Hoboken or what served as the county's new courthouse for the seven years following removal of the county seat. A new two-story, brick courthouse was built in Nahunta in 1930 and continues to serve today, though an addition was constructed in 1978.

County History: On August 14, 1920, the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Brantley County from portions of Charlton, Pierce, and Wayne counties (Ga. Laws 1920, p. 34). In that year's general election, Georgia voters ratified the proposed amendment on Nov. 2, 1920, which marks the date of Brantley County's creation (although a state historical marker on the courthouse square incorrectly cites the county's creation as the day the legislative act proposing the constitutional amendment was approved).

Why was Brantley County created by constitutional amendment instead of an act of the General Assembly? In 1904, Georgia voters had approved a constitutional amendment limiting the number of counties in the state to 145. The next year, the General Assembly created eight new counties, bringing the total number to 145 -- the constitutional limit. Nevertheless, there was continuing pressure to create more counties. Beginning in 1906, lawmakers got around the 145-county limitation by creating new counties through constitutional amendments that were not subject to the limitation. By 1924, Georgia had 161 counties -- 16 of which had been created by constitutional amendment. On Jan. 1, 1932, Milton and Campbell counties merged with Fulton, leaving 159 counties. In 1945, Georgia voters ratified a new constitution -- one which provided an absolute limit of 159 counties, with an additional provision (see text) that no new country could be created except through consolidation of existing counties.

Two years after Brantley County's creation, local authorities discovered that the legal description of the county's boundaries contained several errors. As a result, the General Assembly passed an act on Aug. 5, 1922, which corrected the language of the 1920 constitutional amendment (Ga. Laws 1922, p. 335). According to this act, Brantley County's boundaries were now defined as:

Beginning at the southeast corner of Pierce County, at the southeast corner of lot of land number three hundred (300) in the ninth district of Pierce County, and thence northwards along the line between Pierce and Charlton Counties to the southwest corner of land lot number thirteen (13), in the second district of Charlton County; thence eastwards along the south line of land lots numbers thirteen (13), fifty-two (52), seventy-seven (77), one hundred and sixteen (116), one hundred and forty-one (141), one hundred and eighty (180), two hundred and five (205), and fractional lot two hundred and forty-four (244), and thence continuing in a straight line to the Big Satilla River, and thence northward along the channel of said Big Satilla River to the Camden County line;' thence northwards along the line between Wayne and Camden Counties to the Glynn County line; thence further northwards along the line between the Counties of Wayne and Glynn to a point on said county line one mile north of the main line of the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railway; thence westwards along a line one mile north of and parallel with the aforesaid main line of the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railway to the Little Satilla River and the line between the Counties of Wayne and Pierce; thence southeast along the channel of the Little Satilla River to the southwest corner of land lot number one (1) in the third district of Wayne County; thence southwards along the west lines of land lots numbers thirty-two (32) and thirty-one (31), in the second district of Pierce County to the channel of the Big Satilla River; thence westwards up the channel of the Big Satilla River, through Pierce County, to the county line between Pierce and Ware Counties; and thence south and southeast along the county line between Pierce and Ware Counties to the Charlton County line; and thence eastwards along the county line between Pierce and Charlton to the southeast corner of Pierce County, the point of beginning aforesaid.

There is a debate as to whom Georgia's 158th county was named for. The state historical marker on the grounds of the Brantley County courthouse and several other sources (including an article that appeared in a Savannah newspaper in 1920) say the county was named for Benjamin D. Brantley (1832-1891). Other sources, however, say the real person being honored was Brantley's son, William Gordon Brantley (1860-1934). The younger Brantley worked for a while with his father, but left home to attend the University of Georgia, where he graduated from law school. After practicing law in Pierce County, William Brantley represented Appling County in the Georgia House of Representatives (1884-85) and Georgia Senate (1886-87). He also served as prosecuting attorney (1888-96), but is most remembered for serving eight terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1897-1913). For sixteen years, William Brantley represented the area that would become Brantley County in Congress. In 1913, after thirty years in public office, Brantley decided to return to the practice of law. Seven years later, the legislature created Brantley County. Which Brantley was the legislature honoring? The act creating the county did not say, and notwithstanding the Savannah newspaper account, there is not conclusive evidence. However, most Georgia counties are named for politicians or military heroes, and William Brantley seems far more likely to have the record of public service for which the legislature would honor when naming a new county.

County Seat: Nahunta. The Aug. 14, 1920 legislation proposing a constitutional amendment to create Brantley County provided that Hoboken serve as county seat. Two days later, legislation was approved incorporating Hoboken. Soon, many Brantley County residents petitioned for removal of the county seat to Nahunta. [Click here for the story of the controversy over location of Brantley's county seat.] A referendum was held on June 21, 1923, and of the total votes cast, 1,446 favored Nahunta and 458 supported Hoboken. Subsequently, the General Assembly designated Nahunta Brantley's new county seat effective Aug. 16, 1923 (Ga. Laws 1923, p. 216). In an act of July 28, 1925, the legislature incorporated Nahunta (Ga. Laws 1925, p. 1273).

The name "Nahunta" appears to be of Indian origin, and Kenneth Krakow has identified an Iroquoian word of that spelling believed to refer to tall trees. However, that does not account for why the name was adopted in Georgia. Krakow offers as one possible explanation the story that a timber producer by the name of N.A. Hunter lived in the area. After the railroad came through, a siding was built to load his timber onto railroad cars. This siding was identified as "N.A. Hunter," which in time was noted on maps as "Nahunta." However, Brantley County genealogist Thomas Earl Cleland has checked census records from 1850 to 1900 and can find no N.A. Hunter living in the area. Probably the more plausible explanation is that many of settlers of southern Wayne County came from North Carolina. There is a Wayne County in North Carolina, and in that county was a small town known as Nahunta, which was south of a Nahunta Creek. Thus, when residents of that town came to Wayne County, Ga., they may have thought it fitting to also bring their old town name. [Click here for more on the story of Nahunta.]

Whatever the truth, Georgia's Nahunta owes its existence to the railroad. Around 1860, an east-west railroad was built from the future site of Waycross across southern Wayne County to Brunswick (see 1863 map). (After the war, this became known first as the Brunswick and Albany Railroad, and then as the Brunswick and Western Railroad.) After the war (and likely in the 1870s), a railroad stop by the name of Nahunta developed (see 1881 Georgia railroad map). This Nahunta, however, is not the same as today's Nahunta. In 1902, a north-south railroad from Jesup to Folkston was completed through Wayne County. The new railroad intersected the old east-west railroad about a mile and a half east of Nahunta. Because of the importance of the railroad, residents began moving to the new junction, where a new Nahunta emerged. With that, the old Nahunta became a dead town
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 07:35 AM   #159
GAVic
Largely unnoticed
 
GAVic's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: Middle GA
Oddometer: 759
I thought this was a motorcycle forum, where is your bike?
GAVic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 08:11 AM   #160
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GAVic View Post
I thought this was a motorcycle forum, where is your bike?
From the first post:

Quote:
You can have your motorcycle in the picture if you want, it's up to you.
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 11:30 AM   #161
GAVic
Largely unnoticed
 
GAVic's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: Middle GA
Oddometer: 759
From the first post:
Quote:
Originally Posted by jub jub

Since this is a motorcycle forum, I like showing mine off.
GAVic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2013, 02:08 PM   #162
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GAVic View Post
From the first post:


I wasn't talking about the bike. Everyone knows what it looks like.
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 05:09 PM   #163
GAwoody83
Gnarly Adventurer
 
GAwoody83's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Good Hope, GA
Oddometer: 185
Walton county, city of Monroe. Built in 1886






Location: Monroe
Date Built: 1883-84
Architectural Style: Second Empire
Designer: Bruce and Morgan
Other Information: Shortly after Walton County was created in Dec. 1818, court was held in a cow barn. Other buildings served as seat of government until the county's first courthouse was completed in 1823. That building served until 1845, when another courthouse was built. Walton County's third -- and current -- courthouse was completed in 1884. The clock tower was added in 1910, and the building underwent major restorations in 1933 and 1996. The 1996 renovation left the building's exterior in pristine condition (see photo). Additionally, the large courtroom on the second floor was restored, and the purpose of the courthouse was changed from a general-purpose county government building to a facility for holding superior court trials. As a result, county judicial and administrative officials and departments are housed in a number of courthouse annexes situated immediately across the streets to the north, west, and south of the courthouse square, while the Walton County commission has its own building at the rear of the courthouse.

GAwoody83 screwed with this post 11-08-2013 at 05:56 PM
GAwoody83 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 05:23 PM   #164
GAVic
Largely unnoticed
 
GAVic's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: Middle GA
Oddometer: 759
If not for the clock tower I would think I was looking at the front of someones house.
GAVic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 08:43 AM   #165
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 13,374
Thanks GAwoody83 for your contribution!

That makes 102.

57 left to go!

jub jub screwed with this post 11-06-2013 at 09:07 AM
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 07:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014