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Old 10-11-2013, 10:19 PM   #166
Cyclic Rival
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Awesome to see you were in my area of the world, Portland. You happen to come at a bad time, it was pretty much completely dry all summer from June to the end of September. It did rain pretty damn heavy towards the mid/end of September, but that was the first rain of the season.

Motocorsa is a wonderful dealer, they have wonderful costumer service and are very down to earth. Their gear section is just as awesome as their bike selection. Every single one of their employees are very down to earth too, Arun (the GM) is very chill and you can tell he loves his job. I actually bought my SV-650 through their used department and have nothing bad to say about them.

There is an Uwijimaya in the Portland area too (Beaverton), it is the only place I can get my favorite drink from when I was living in Okinawa.
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Old 10-11-2013, 11:19 PM   #167
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Rain? Did someone say something about rain?

(Video)

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Old 10-12-2013, 12:19 AM   #168
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After Whidbey:



Reason enough to visit Seattle:


And a very good reminder, boys and girls, that we're all mortal, we all die and our lives are bookended by two dates--only one of which we know. Tragedy isn't dying young trying to achieve a goal. Tragedy--real tragedy? Dying old with unfulfilled dreams.


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Old 10-12-2013, 12:09 PM   #169
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That right there is something nobody I know seems to understand. All of my friends have graduated college and are settling into 40-50 year long careers with a gracious two weeks of vacation of year!

What does it matter if you live to be 80 if all you ever did was work?

All they talk about is buying a house, gotta have a house so you can have long term financial stability and security.
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Old 10-12-2013, 09:27 PM   #170
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Originally Posted by KustomizingKid View Post
That right there is something nobody I know seems to understand. All of my friends have graduated college and are settling into 40-50 year long careers with a gracious two weeks of vacation of year!

What does it matter if you live to be 80 if all you ever did was work?

All they talk about is buying a house, gotta have a house so you can have long term financial stability and security.
+1,000... I don't get it...
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Old 10-13-2013, 08:18 PM   #171
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Originally Posted by Tallbastid View Post
+1,000... I don't get it...
Some people desire greatly to have a family (kids). The nomad lifestyle is not usually great for that. There are folks who do it though. Maybe Dennis has some insight on what might trigger a person to go one way (suburbs/family) or the other (travel/explore).

Personally, I have both bugs. That means I did a little adventuring, and now I have a family. I will adventure with them as they get older.





Is that a shot from under the bench? What's the zm?

Sent from my fat thumbs on a small touch screen.
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In short, adaptation is the precursor to growth and seeking out difficult, uncomfortable and challenging situations accelerates development, enriches our lives and provides us with the kind of awesome fucking memories that will sustain us until a final sleep rounds our little lives.
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Old 10-13-2013, 08:59 PM   #172
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Originally Posted by AntiHero View Post
Rain? Did someone say something about rain?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/98307946@N06/10220182486/
Yeah, that's the only time my bike gets washed too.
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Old 10-13-2013, 09:41 PM   #173
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by fifthcircle View Post
Some people desire greatly to have a family (kids). The nomad lifestyle is not usually great for that. There are folks who do it though. Maybe Dennis has some insight on what might trigger a person to go one way (suburbs/family) or the other (travel/explore).

Personally, I have both bugs. That means I did a little adventuring, and now I have a family. I will adventure with them as they get older.

Is that a shot from under the bench? What's the zm?

Sent from my fat thumbs on a small touch screen.
I think most people do what they do because of social proof. People do what other people do and people avoid doing what other people aren't doing. That's why we don't find many LDS types in, say, Tehran, and that's why we don't see many Muslims named Bubba who live in Louisiana. Sometimes reward is a direct result of fulfilling those expectations. Think about how smoking a cigarette as a teenager felt....physically it was gross, but there was a particular 'rush' that came from feeling like all those people you looked up to your whole life who smoked. There is a pleasure that's intrinsic to having children, but how much of that pleasure comes from the biology of maternalism/paternalism (think oxytocin), how much of it comes from the experience itself and how much of it comes from the satisfaction of fulfilling duty? Dunno, that's a question for every person probably shouldn't ask themselves. If it makes you happy, go with it.

There's just no right or wrong answer on the surface. Everyone needs to develop a sensitivity to what it is they want and why it is they choose a course of action (or for that matter, don't choose at all). Being able to block out your own fear and desire to appease the expectations of society, those we love, etc., lowers the chance that resentment and misery will be the only reward for doing whatever it is we think we have to do.

And yes, that's a shot from under the bench. "Zm" is perhaps a story for another day....
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Old 10-13-2013, 10:02 PM   #174
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By the time we get to a point where we begin ‘prioritizing’ our lives, a lot of those expectations have already sunk in, rooted. It’s a perfectly timed topic, because I had a series of pictures I wasn’t sure if I’d include, but now it all collides into making some sense.

Bike was still at Ducati Seattle, and I found myself meandering with my two feet around the area surrounding the hotel I was staying in, which happened to be near the University of Washington. Students were just returning to school, talking about course loads, housing, new people they met, how many books they had to buy. Guys were buying hair gel at the drug store, girls panty liners and tweezers (I just needed some fingernail clippers-swiss army knife got chucked at the airport.)


I kept walking with the flow until I wandered onto campus and into a building. Students chatted nervously in the halls with professors about goals and expectations, others gushed with each other about ideals, policies and opinions of the world. Enthusiasm beamed, lines were drawn, important matters were discussed. On campus awkward hand-holding between new couples could be seen, along with shy, unreturned glances for some without a hand to hold.





Voices, expressions, gaits, gestures, mannerisms all carried with them a sense of hope, the feeling that the future would be better than the present. I’d always loved school, but the ‘hope aspect’ was something I’d never really considered because it was so omnipresent. I’d felt it, I, too, had that expression of confidence and was quite certain that my will, alloyed with hard work and dedication, would bring about a brighter future. I couldn’t help feeling fearful, and I’m not sure why. It was a strange response. I didn’t belong there anymore. I feel as if I had seen the future and it’s not what it once was.



Surrounded by kids who had their whole lives in front of them I felt disgust and a tinge of envy. Disgust because, I hate to say it, collectively they were all so wrong. And envy because that kind of blind hope, of revolution and change and right triumphing over wrong has been replaced by a world that is very much imperfect and likely will stay that way. I had the clarity of someone returning from the future, knowing more about inevitability than I wished I did.

(I still had some great memories, though…)


Most will graduate into well-paying jobs, look forward to trips to Ikea on the weekend, marry a sweetheart, buy a house, raise a family, go to Disneyworld for Christmas. Some would have children and be happy, some will have children and feel trapped. 50% would be divorced, some will be jobless, a couple dead. Some will have found the love of their life and lost him or her, and some will believe themselves chained to that person, despite not loving them or being loved by them for many years. But nearly all those students will eventually try to connect the dots from that day they didn’t notice I was among them to where they ended up and still not know where the broken lines went awry. Other lines will simply just fade, ending with an event or explanation. All will wonder where the past 20 years went. Maybe they’ll keep the hope up, maybe not. Maybe they’ll even return, trying to get not an education, but a sense of possibilities.



Whatever the case, it’s not depressing to me. I’ll still continue to create and attempt. The absence of hope doesn’t negatively impact my desire to try—and it certainly doesn’t devalue the importance of hard work or the significance of having balls.
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Old 10-14-2013, 10:07 AM   #175
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There is an argument that the choices society offers individuals are designed to lead individuals into behavior that is in the best interests of society, rather than the individual's best interest. I think nomadic biking runs counter to that. Being an outsider is tough until you wash up on the Island of Misfit Toys.

I just spent 20 days overseas (driving a car many hours per day) with hardly any internet access and found it strangely comforting to know that you were out there on your ride. Don't know why that was, maybe being locked inside a steel box day after day triggered a subconscious search for signs of freedom. Just caught up now on the RR....great, great stuff. Thanks.
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:14 AM   #176
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Old 10-14-2013, 12:56 PM   #177
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There is an argument that the choices society offers individuals are designed to lead individuals into behavior that is in the best interests of society, rather than the individual's best interest. I think nomadic biking runs counter to that. Being an outsider is tough until you wash up on the Island of Misfit Toys.

I just spent 20 days overseas (driving a car many hours per day) with hardly any internet access and found it strangely comforting to know that you were out there on your ride. Don't know why that was, maybe being locked inside a steel box day after day triggered a subconscious search for signs of freedom. Just caught up now on the RR....great, great stuff. Thanks.
Glad to have you back. Love the reference to the Island of Misfit Toys. And yeah, I suppose most of us who ride bikes are accustomed to a man vs. society struggle. The more I witness the consequences of large groups and/or organizations trying to change the world for the better the more I conclude that positive outcomes and overall satisfaction are only abundant when near the 'halos' of individuals pursuing their own peculiar forms of happiness and fulfillment.
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Old 10-14-2013, 01:40 PM   #178
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'Social proof' is a great way to put it.

I've always been more impressed by those who allow their passions to dictate their lives versus societal expectations. Ski bums, gear heads, actors and artists always intrigued me more than any big wig businessman or sports hero has, yet I know I'm in the minority. If more people took a few days and wandered off somewhere on their own to question it themselves, perhaps we'd have more Muslims named Bubba in the bayou - who's to say? Ignorance, fear, emptiness, depression, violence, obesity; it could all be avoided by choosing our path versus riding the safety wave society has constructed around us. Many of our issues stem from the methods we use to cope with not following our passions.
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Tallbastid screwed with this post 10-14-2013 at 05:03 PM
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Old 10-14-2013, 03:01 PM   #179
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AntiHero, I know this is a bit off topic ( although there are actually two themes going on here), but when I was a young Marine, I would read books from the Commandant's Reading list and profited greatly from their experiences and thoughts. Did this intermittently into my later years and always grew from it.

I am curious, if you don't mind, what would be the books in your reading list ?
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Old 10-14-2013, 03:21 PM   #180
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AntiHero, I know this is a bit off topic ( although there are actually two themes going on here), but when I was a young Marine, I would read books from the Commandant's Reading list and profited greatly from their experiences and thoughts. Did this intermittently into my later years and always grew from it.

I am curious, if you don't mind, what would be the books in your reading list ?
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