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Old 02-07-2014, 09:14 AM   #211
GuateRider
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It was good meeting you the other day (with James)

Suerte en el Acatenango !!!
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Old 02-07-2014, 09:53 AM   #212
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Originally Posted by GuateRider View Post
It was good meeting you the other day (with James)

Suerte en el Acatenango !!!
You as well Julio, Suerte en su proximo viaje. Oh and by the way, I smelt the chicken you guys hooked James up with when he left, that was some finger licking good chicken.
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Old 02-07-2014, 10:05 AM   #213
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50. A Package From North of The Wall, Green Light Go

I ran into Guatemala City yesterday to pick up my package from customs. A big thanks to Danielle and Kosh for hooking me up with some awesome shipping, and also to Jose at CATours in Antigua for letting me use their mail-forwarding address out of Miami. Put these two together and the package got from Seattle to Miami to Guatemala City in 5 days (two of those being weekend days) for an end cost of 339Q (about $40). If you are ever shipping down to Latin America, I highly recommend finding someone with a mail-forwarding address (and some solid homies). No tom-foolery at customs and a more secure shipping option for what is generally a better price.



Along with my camera, a few miscellaneous parts, and my bike title, I also got a few added keepsake pics tucked in as well. This was taken on the first day of my trip. Some friends came along for the first night and we camped on the Washington coast.



And some old photos of drunkenness, that I like to assume is still occuring back home on occasion.





Thanks for package and all of it’s extra contents, you guys are champs.

--------------------

I talked to Victor (the owner of OX Expeditions) and he said that I could jump on their trip going up Volcan Acatenango tomorrow for free if I wanted. This means I have direct transport to and from the base of the volcano, and Andrew (a guide and friend here) will be taking the group up. Once at the top Victor and Andrew said I could break off from the group and camp alone on the summit if I want, then just meet the them back down at basecamp the next day. I really wanted to do it completely solo but this option seems overall to be better. Cheap (free) and still allow me some solitude for the night while on the summit.

I met another rider, Brett, two days ago when he came in to grab a drink at the hostel. He’s 27 and from Canada. He’s a great example of how you don’t need to overthink what is ‘necessary’ to travel with in Latin America. He’s got jean pants, a leather jacket, and a big Suzuki 800 cruiser (Boulevard maybe). Through him you can see you really can take any bike. He hasn’t been able to do a ton of serious offroad with the cruiser, but how many people really do? He hasn’t had a single mechanical trouble in 60k some odd miles, this is an envious statistic for anyone. How many of us can say the same? He came in yesterday to the hostel and said he just got robbed at gunpoint riding around the volcanos. It’s a bummer to hear about, but good he was OK overall. There was a crashed vehicle in the road that he was riding on so he had to turn around and head back. The people who robbed him must have seen him go by earlier and known he would have to turn around at the road block and eventually and come back. When he did, they were waiting for him. These people aren’t gangsters or anything like that, just locals that saw an opportunity to feed themselves and their families for quite a while and decided to take advantage of that opportunity. It’s unfortunate that we can be targets for stuff like this, but it’s good to keep in mind that most of the time that’s all it is, just an opportunity for them, not a mission to kill or hurt us. It’s good to remember this and keep a cool head, like Brett did, and just ride it out. Him telling me this also inspired me to not do the Volcano solo, as it would be obvious to anyone working in the fields/woods leading up to the volcano that I’m alone, and thus will be returning at some point solo as well.

Heading up there tomorrow at 6am, hopefully my ankle holds up, super stoked.



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Old 02-07-2014, 07:01 PM   #214
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Oh and by the way, I smelt the chicken you guys hooked James up with when he left, that was some finger licking good chicken.
Actually I expected you to come back with James for lunch ; let me know when you get back from the Acatenango , would be great to exchange stories over lunch or dinner at our place
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:20 PM   #215
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Actually I expected you to come back with James for lunch ; let me know when you get back from the Acatenango , would be great to exchange stories over lunch or dinner at our place
This sounds great but it looks like James and I are hitting the road tomorrow in the AM for El Salvador. Excited to be back in the saddle again.
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:21 PM   #216
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51. Volcan Acatenango - Short

Got back today from Volcan Acatenango. Had a great trip and managed to get a couple decent photos, even though the whether wasn't the best. Camping on the summit got a little hectic, but it was one of those experiences that pushes your understanding of what you are capable of, and all-in-all it was a fantastic experience. I'll do a more thorough write-up with pictures and a bit longer video later, but here's a short to give an idea.



With Acatenango in the bag, I'm ready to hit the road again. Tomorrow AM Jame's and I are headed south into El Salvador. Yeehaw!
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:53 PM   #217
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With Acatenango in the bag, I'm ready to hit the road again. Tomorrow AM Jame's and I are headed south into El Salvador. Yeehaw!
Shiny side up, brother!
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Old 02-10-2014, 10:04 AM   #218
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I'm looking forward to seeing the full length video with some explanation of what happened. Looks like it was whippin' on the top of that volcano.
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Old 02-10-2014, 11:53 AM   #219
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Inspiring story, be safe!!

btw, you better get that subframe looked at
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Old 02-11-2014, 09:39 AM   #220
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Shiny side up, brother!
Kosh, you would like El Salvador, so far it might be a favorite place. We'll see though. More on that in a bit.

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I'm looking forward to seeing the full length video with some explanation of what happened. Looks like it was whippin' on the top of that volcano.
Whippin' it was for sure, wasn't my brightest idea ever to pitch my tent right up on the summit, but hey, sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do. I'll be writing something more thorough up in a bit.

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Inspiring story, be safe!!

btw, you better get that subframe looked at
Totally thought it would snap right off.
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Old 02-12-2014, 04:33 AM   #221
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52. Wrapping Up Guatemala, Volcan Acatenango

With my work almost done, the weekend almost here, and my exit of Guatemala eminent, I had one last thing that I wanted to do. Get on top of Volcan Acatenango and soak the last month all in. Victor, the owner of OX Adventures where I have been working, said that I could jump on one of their tours going on an overnight trip to Acatenango. He said I could even peel away from the group and camp on the summit solo if I really wanted to. Cool beans, man, itís a deal.

We all met at 6am at OX and loaded up. We stopped for a quick coffee run before the 45min ride up to the Volcano base.



These ozzyís were here for their buddyís Ďbucks partyí (bachelor party) and had been having a good time the night before. Morning today looked a bit tough.



We knocked our energy boosters back and headed out.



We arrived at the unload point and took the first of what would be many steps towards the top of Acatenango.



There are several distinct zones that you go through along the way. The first is farmland.


Photo credit to Robert Tremblay



Technically this part is private land, but Ďtollsí havenít been implemented yet, so you weave your way through the farms upwards.





Here we reach the next zone, tropical rainforest. Here we take our first rest.





We continue climbing upwards. Vytaus (Lithuania) and Che (Argentina) lead the way.



Next we reach cloud forests. The diversity of plants is remarkable, yet there appear to be no animals at all, not even birds.



Next we cross into alpine forest.



And soon we are peaking through the clouds.



Here we rest and take lunch. I took a cat nap, as like a kid on christmas eve, I was too excited to get any sleep the night before. Andrew thinks this shit is easy.



We continue upwards and the trees begin to thin out.




We are getting close to the first of the two summits on Acatenango, the forested walking trails are giving way to deposits of volcanic rock and ash.



We push on towards the first summit.



After about 5.5 hours we reach the first summit, here we will set up basecamp.



This dog went came up too with another group, she seemed pretty pooped.



I kept my bag packed, as I intended to go to the second summit and set-up shop there. Somewhere in the mist of this picture, about 45 mins higher is the summit of Acatenango.



The weather was shite and we were all tired so not many people were interested in going to the real summit that night. Andrew (my coworker, guide for the day, and new friend) and Che (Argentinian and new friend) were down to go to the top, so Andrew lead the way.



Here is the Ďknife ridgeí as we get about half way to the summit.



Andrew and I striking a pose.





Almost to the summit.



At the top is a big crater of just volcanic rock and ash. You know youíre close when everything else ends and all that is left is this rubble.



Cresting over the ridgeline we drop into the large bowl/crater that is the summit. Here the rock/ash is completely black and nothing grows but a few patches of tough green moss.



We drop down into the crater and look for a spot to pitch my tent for the night. In case things get out of hand and I need to get down, Andrew shows me the way out. ďGo that wayĒ



We cross over to the south side of the crater and climb up to the edge of the large bowl. Here is where you can best see Volcan Fuego. Acatenango is considered a dormant volcano, but Fuego is active and very much alive. Right now we are socked in with clouds, but it should be right in front of us if we were able to see it.



If this is the best spot to see Fuego, then this is where I want to stay. I drop the tent and the guys help me lay down some reinforcements from the wind.



Before heading back down to basecamp, Che, Andrew, and I grab a photo together on the summit. Saweet. Thanks for the help getting bunkered in guys.



Killer view. Should be able to see Fuego right from my tent door...if the clouds ever clear.



The wind picks up a beat, I have some time before dark so I reinforce my tent with more rocks.



The wind picks up more, so I bring rocks inside as well.



More wind.



So again, more rocks.



Itís cold and getting windier, so I retreat inside my tent and wait for sunset, hoping for a clear shot of Fuego. About an hour later I peek through my plastic view hole and see an orange glow. Sunset.



I look out to the south and see Fuego in the clouds.



After all the time in Antigua, after all the work to get up here, Iím stuck in awe at the sight of what I had hoped for. Itís beautiful.



The view didnít last long, but for the 15 minutes of sunset that it was visible for, I couldnít have asked for a better time. I soaked in the moments, snapped a few photos, and then crawled back into my tent and zipped it up for the night. This is when things started to get a bit squirrely.

As the sun went down the winds became more lively and active. I had plenty of stones to keep it from blowing away, but with every passing half hour the wind was gaining fervor and intent. My tent was being battered from one side, then the other, slowing working my guide lines loose and beginning to warp my tent poles as they fought to stay together. At 13,0044 ft we are officially in whatís considered Ďhigh altitudeí zone. At this elevation altitude sickness can be a problem if you arenít accustomed to the altitude. Iíve got a pretty pounding headache, and Iím my thought process is becoming slightly discombobulated. Thinking about stuff is like trying to do math right after waking up from a deep sleep, itís labored and a bit slow. I brush the wind off as some temporary anomaly and bunker down for what I figure might be a bit of a loud night. I pop in some ear buds and crank up the Bill Withers. Shits peachy.

Some time passes and Iím brought back to reality with the top of my tent hitting me in the face as itís crushed by the wind. Welp, looks like our situation has changed a bit since I last checked in to reality now hasnít it. I decide that I may not be thinking completely clearly at the moment, cranking Bill Withers through my earbuds on top of a Volcano. I decide to get rid of the music and pay attention for a hot minute. I watch the tent for activity and check the time. Itís only 8 fucking 30?! Iím starting to feel nauseous and Iím putting the puzzle pieces together piece by piece. I can tell I need to rethink this situation a bit and go over what I know. I know that the wind has become steadily worse since the sun went down about 2 hours ago. I take a look outside and see itís essentially a white-out. I canít see anything more than 5 ft in front of me, and the wind is absolutely howling. Itís looking like being up on the summit may not have been the brightest idea. However, seeing as I canít see anything, getting off the summit safely may not be in my current bag of options. I know that if the wind gets worse, my tent may not be able to last until the morning, and when it rips apart, Iím shit out of luck. I know Iím not going to die or anything, as I can certainly salvage part of the tent and dig a hole in the ash for protection from the wind, then ride out the night until the morning when the winds die down with the sun. I donít want this to be my only reality though, and if I can save the tent, I obviously would prefer this.

I decide to get my backpack packed in case the rain/wind-fly breaks apart and I need to abandon ship quick-like. I bundle up, re-pack my food and water so itís easily accessible in case I get ash in my eyes and canít see, and take note of where my important items are located if I need to find them. I then sit and wait in my empty tent as itís toppled over left and right from the wind. Iím not sure what Iím waiting for. Maybe Iím hoping that the wind will die down and I wonít need to leave and go out in the wrath of fucking mordor. I shake off my pounding headache and realize again that Iím not thinking straight, damn altitude. I check my watch and itís just now 10 fucking 30. Thereís still probably 3 more hours of the wind getting worse. Time to go.

I crawl out of my tent and into the pummeling wind. Iím laying on the ground to stay out of the gusts as I untie the tent one line at a time, being sure to leave the leading side cords securely attached to a rock. I manage to unclip the polls and collapse the tent, removing it from most of the wind. I place rocks on top to keep it all from blowing away. Piece by piece I scrunch the tent up and cram it into my pack. I lose nothing to the wind, I have all of the tent. This is good. If I need to bivy somewhere I can still use the pieces to protect me from the wind. I have my headlamp on but itís like having your high beams on in a snow storm. Everything just looks worse. Before I head off the crater rim, I cover my light and look up to the sky. I find the glow of the moon through the haze, and make out itís orientation in relation to the dark glow of the crater rim. If I get disoriented while crossing the crater, I can use this to get my bearings. I drop down into the crater and traverse across the side towards the other rim. I cover my headlamp occasionally to better see the crater silhouette in the moons glow. Thereís nothing to trip over, itís all just volcanic ash and rock. The wind is blowing less inside the crater, but itís still an incredible amount. Itís not raining, but Iím in the middle of a cloud, so with the wind, all the water condenses on your clothes and body as if it were raining. Iím becoming very wet, very quickly. I find the other side of the crater and the rocks that dot the rim, indicating where the path leads out. I crest the ridge and slide down the other side, desperately looking for footprints in the ash that might indicate a commonly traveled path. I take deep breaths and remind myself to not get excited, and take my time, I donít want to walk off an unseen edge or fall into one of the other more dangerous craters. I cover my light to look for the ridgeline silhouette to follow down towards basecamp. I can see edges, and a ridgeline, but canít tell if itís the one I came in on, and thereís drop-offs between me and it. I look back to the moon, but canít tell if Iím where I need to be for the path. I want to think if I just keep going a bit further Iíll find the path, but I know this is futile. Being back down in basecamp with the group would be more comforting, but I need to accept my reality, itís a more dangerous idea than to stay on top. I hike back up to the craters edge and head down into the bowl, the least wind should be in the very center.

When Andrew and Che hiked me in to the summit they showed me a downed radio tower, or what appeared to be some sort of fallen metal structure in the center of the crater. This is what I was looking for. Something familiar to spend the night next to. In the blur I stumbled across it. I dropped my pack in exhaustion and stacked a rock on it so it wouldnít blow away. I looked up into the sky and took a deep breath. At this elevation doing anything is tiring. I breathe a winded sigh of relief. Iím now in the best place I can be given my options. This is comforting and calming. I just need to carefully unpack and set up my tent, be sure nothing blows away by accident in the process, and Iíll have a perfectly good shelter to stay in for the rest of the night until sunrise. I remind myself to not get lazy now, pay attention and stay focused. I take care to set up the tent well and secure all my guidelines. I bring rocks inside and stack them in each corner of the tent for extra security. Everything is soaked, water is pooling at the bottom of the tent, my zippers wonít close as ash is caked all the teeth, but Iím protected from the elements, and in a good spot. I can now relax, take a breather, and soak in the joyous comfort of being in my tent again. Everythings fine now, Iím just in a waiting game. This is a game I know I can win. The feeling is one of release, I can now let my focus go.

Itís 12:30am, Iím pooped from the last couple hours, as well as the previous days hiking. I crawl into my soaked sleeping bag and drift into a confusing delirium of shivering from the cold and exhaustion. With the other more pressing priorities of shelter solved, Iím free again to think about the nausea. I have an urgent need to vomit suddenly. My zippers donít close so crawling out of my tent is easy. I donít mind the cold, as the after-puke-sleep will be well worth it. Part of altitude sickness is not being able to digest things well. I assumed I wouldnít have a problem with the altitude, so foolishly ate a large meal on the summit. It needed to be gone. I crawled back into my tent afterwards, breathed a sigh of relief, and curled up in a ball to conserve heat. The next 4 hours were spent drifting in and out of Ďawakenessí. I came to again when I heard the sound of voices. Andrew and whoever else from basecamp who wanted to come see sunrise were coming into the crater. I poked my head out and turned my headlamp on in the dusk to attract them to where I was. They looked tired from the hike up and likely lack of sleep as well. Andrew laughed at my new location off the ridgeline, as he had suggested. I chuckled, ďyeah, shit got a little real for a minute, if anyone wants to camp on the crater edge, I donít recommend it. Watch out for my puke.Ē

They walked up to where I had set-up the night before and watched the sunrise. There wasnít much to see as the wind was still pretty strong and the summit was mostly socked in, but just the feeling of being up there, on the summit of a volcano, is beautiful even if only by itself. I crawled out, packed up my tent, and met them on the ridge before walking back down to basecamp together. 4 hours later we were back down at the trailhead and throwing our packs onto the roof of our transport van. Although it was a wild ride of a night, I had such a blast and was so pleased that I was able to get up to the summit before leaving Guatemala. That sense of self satisfaction at a goal and challenge accomplished is incredibly humbling. There are not many places where you can get to a summit that high without some serious alpine equipment, let alone be able to camp out and peep on an active volcano. I like experiences like this, as they make you feel alive more than any other, and they also redefine what you know you are capable of, which makes future difficult life-moments so much easier. This was a great way to wrap up my time in Guatemala, and I left feeling ready to move forward...aside from needing a good siesta of course.


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Old 02-12-2014, 08:07 AM   #222
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Those freak encounters with nature are always exciting as long as you are prepared to weather them. Sounds like you had an awesome time. Looking forward to the next installment. Good luck brother.
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:32 AM   #223
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I like experiences like this, as they make you feel alive more than any other, and they also redefine what you know you are capable of, which makes future difficult life-moments so much easier.


man, i really love your RR and the pics and gnarly experiences. but i gotta say, THAT was one of the most irresponsible things i've read of someone doing on ADV. glad you survived it.

we all want you to make it to the end of your RR.
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Old 02-12-2014, 10:34 AM   #224
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Those freak encounters with nature..
nothing freak about hiking up to the top of a volcano and intentionally camping solo at altitude on the edge of the rim.

i'm pretty sure that nature was doing what nature always does up there..
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Old 02-12-2014, 11:01 AM   #225
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Good story, one for the memory when the trip has long since past. Nice you had a good outcome, you sure have to know when to hunker down and hole up when you get in over your head.
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