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Old 03-24-2014, 09:28 PM   #331
SeanPNW OP
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Soldering gun? One of you guys is carrying a soldering gun?! That's a complete kit!!
It sure comes in handy when you really need one, but no we don't have one, we got the guys at place where we purchased the brushes on Pies De La Popa to do the connection for us. Guy was chill, didn't even charge us, and let us use his sandpaper to file down the brushes
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Old 03-27-2014, 06:09 AM   #332
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67. Finding Medellin

James and I had the bikes fixed and ready to roll, so we unloaded them to the docks and headed to customs to take care of our importation paperwork. Catch you later Wild Card.



Except...my bike now wouldnít start. I turned the key but had no electronics, no ignition, nada. I started taking stuff apart, digging down into the ignition itself as this seemed to be where the electricity wasnít getting to, from there, I could work backward depending on what I found.



It didnít take much looking, once I got the ignition apart and opened up, the mountain of corrosion from the saltwater put up a big indicator as to where the problem was. I cleared out the corrosion but could see that the positive lead to the internal switch panel had completely corroded away, wire and all. You can see in the photo there is a blue and brown wire, but the contact point above them is empty, this is where the white wire should be, but the contact and all of the copper cable has dissolved away.





I needed to solder a new connection so James hopped a lift back to the boat and he and Tuna brought back a generator and a solder gun. Thanks guys.



I wouldnít call it the prettiest connection, but 12 volts get through when the contact is made, and thatís all I need.



Of course though, I found problems further down the positive wire, in this case, at the next connection towards the battery. When I pulled on the wire to solder the end to the ignition, the connection further down towards the battery pulled out, it had corroded away as well.



Screw that socket connector, I pulled the positive wire out of the connector and put two individual connectors on either end and routed them around the bad connection. Problem solved.



All of this took the better part of the afternoon and it was too late to go do customs. James went hunting for a place to stay for the night while I cleaned up and put the bike back together. We found space at the same place as Bryan and Sonyea, so we rolled the bikes in next to theirs and and called it a night.



Back in Guatemala I had a socket connector melt on my low beam headlight. After it melted the connection became a bit cattywampus. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didnít. While in Pies De La Popa the other day I stumbled across the exact connector I needed while we were there working out the brush problem on Jamesí bike. This place seems to have anything you might need. We swung back by there and picked up a couple spares to do the fix another day.



We went to customs and the process of importing our bikes was smooth, professional, and simple. In fact, the most professional place we had ever gone to before. There was AC, everyone got their own clerk to work with them through the entire process, and a fine little chair to sit in while they waited. Colombia, you sure have got your shit together. We spent the rest of the day on the road riding towards a place called Monteria where we would spend a night or so to break up the ride to Medellin. I took hardly any photos that day. The landscape was perfectly nice, the people in the road very kind, but for some reason, I just didnít feel like picking the camera up for anything. I spent a lot of time up in my helmet instead, thinking about what we were now starting. Although I have almost been in the road for 7 months, I have just now arrived at where I really felt the journey would begin, South America.

Itís not to say that I thought nothing of Central America, in fact quite the opposite. Iíve been on a beautiful road trip of sorts. Iíve met amazing people, made great friends, and scene beautiful landscapes. As with any road trip though, the whole time that I have been enjoying the journey, I have also been heading towards a destination. This destination is one that holds a great deal of intrigue for me. Like a little boy dreaming of one day going to far away lands, the place I have been dreaming about getting to is South America. Now that Iím here, with my wheels pointed down the road, what feels like an entirely new journey begins.

As I rode throughout the day the passing landscapes punctuated my thoughts. I rode for miles, thinking over the last 7 months. Flashes of where I had been, and the people I had met, came flickering in and out. I thought about the things that had led up to this trip, and what needed to have happened to arrive here. Itís odd to look back so retrospectively on what feels like a time now long past, and only to do so once having arrived at the start of this new journey. I guess you donít think about the road trip while you are on it, you only look back at the experiences you had after the fact. With the sun setting low and the roads thinning out, more so to remember the thoughts, than to remember anything physical in the photo, I raised my camera and snapped a single pic.



We pulled in to Monteria and met up with our couch surf host Vito later that night. Vito is an architect here in Monteria and has cut out a pretty nice life for himself. Monteria seems to have a lot of work and industry. Itís a city that revolves around the work thatís there and the people that do that work. There are many suburbs with middle class families. There are fast food joints and coffee shop chains, malls and shopping centers. Everything is very neat, tidy, and put together, yet nothing is ostentatious or outrageously affluent. Just nice, quiet, and comfortable. Itís a good place to relax and do nothing in particular. We hung out and let the thoughts of the last few days catch up and sink in.



Itís also real fuckní hot, so big one dollar bags of water are a must.



We stay for a couple nights here and then jet town in search of something else. We are headed to Medellin today, should be about a days ride. When we pull in for a break, or stop for food, we both seem less talkative. Maybe we are both up in our helmets now, or just taking it all in. Maybe itís the heat.



We get back on the road and burn further southwest towards Medellin.



The road starts to liven up a bit and makes a break upwards towards the mountains.



Here the roads get great. The air becomes crisper and a cool breeze runs through our jackets.



We stop at the summit and both agree, that was a needed change in scenery and climate.



On the other side of the mountains we get some rain from the clouds piled up against the ridgeline. Our gear is cool now and the riding is refreshing.



We make our way down through windy roads. Pastures and constantly feeding cows can be found on either side. Everything is lush with easy rains. Tranquil beauty.



We take in the scenery, but our asses are getting sore from riding all day.



In the next town we stop for some grub and a rest.



A big plate oí food and a brewsky sure make a good pit stop. Colombia has the best bread in all of Latin America so far. ďBread? Whatís the big deal?Ē Oh trust me, the quality of one's bread is a BIG fucking deal! The modern world was basically founded off bread! Having good bread is a sign of a country with itís shit together in my opinion. This place happened to have some bread ball things that tasted like buttery corn bread, but more bready than crumbly, and they had likely been cooked in an oven tended by bread angels. They melted in your mouth. allallllaaggghhhhhhh, nom nom nom.



Eventually we made it to Medellin, and while rolling through town, we came across the flagship Yamaha store for all of Colombia. James has been looking for some brake pads for a while now, we hoped to find some here. The guys at the shop were blown away by Jamesí bike. One of the mechanics came out and said he had been working at this store for 15 years, and had never once seen another of Jamesí bike. They were even more impressed he had ridden it all the way from Canadia.



They ended up not having the pads, which I guess is expected if they have never once seen another xj650 down there, but the mechanic gave us some solid advice for another workshop of sorts near by. James went and spoke with them and they said ďno we donít have them, but come by tomorrow and weíll just make them for you.Ē Ö.ĒMake them?Ē Well sweet, tomorrow it is.

We found our way to our couch surf host in the southern part of town. Meet Matt (left) and Justin (right) from South Africa.



Theyíve got a rad pad in a great neighborhood. They said we could kick it for a few days so weíll probably be shacking up here for the weekend. Thanks gents.



Just from riding through this town to get here, Iím really stoked to see whatís going on around here. Oddly enough, it feels very similar to Seattle, just 2 or 3 times bigger, and everyone speaks another language of course...and I would suppose the culture is completely different as well, but whatever, point is it feels comfortable and inviting. Thereís something very intriguing about Colombia as a whole, and Medellin is no exception. Iíve only just ridden through it, but something feels fascinating and vibrant, everything is buzzing. Iíve heard people get stuck here very easily. Like one of those siren goddesses singing her enchanting song, Medellin sucks travelers in and never lets them go. Iím not the person to get easily trapped somewhere, so weíll see how strong her sirens sing.

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Old 03-27-2014, 08:02 PM   #333
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(Bullwinkle voice)

"Hey Rocky, watch me make this copper disappear"

Saltwater + stray current = poof! No copper!

Glad you got it sorted quickly! VAYA!
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:25 PM   #334
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Sean, was your bike to against a railing of the sailboat?


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Old 03-29-2014, 02:47 PM   #335
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Originally Posted by Adios Pantalones View Post
(Bullwinkle voice)

"Hey Rocky, watch me make this copper disappear"

Saltwater + stray current = poof! No copper!

Glad you got it sorted quickly! VAYA!
"Poof" is correct Keith, I was pretty amazed how fast it happened.

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Sean, was your bike to against a railing of the sailboat?


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Hey Oldswimr, yeah all the bikes were up against the rail. Mine was at the front. I was told there would be no water on deck by what I assumed was the captain but in reality was a booking agent through a secondary website. All the more reason to not book through an agent and instead go straight through the captain if possible, if I had booked straight through Captain Aquaticus for the Wild Card he would have advised me to bring a tarp for sure. Guess I should have known better though, problems are solved now.
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:49 PM   #336
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PS more to come.
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Old 03-30-2014, 03:43 PM   #337
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Glad to see you guys made it south. Just out of curiosity, what is the milage on James bike? Has it given him any issues during the trip?

Later
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Old 03-30-2014, 05:18 PM   #338
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Glad to see you guys made it south. Just out of curiosity, what is the milage on James bike? Has it given him any issues during the trip?

Later
john
Hey Eagletalon, thanks we are stoked to be down here. James says he's got 75,000 kilometers on her. Aside from replacing the starter brushes, no problems. Just the usual tires, oil, and brakes. She's a pig and just keeps on trucking.
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Old 03-30-2014, 09:38 PM   #339
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68. Dodging Sirens and Chilling in Pereira

We have been in Medellin for a few days now, and I must say the mythical siren gods that pull travellers in to this place and never release their grasp, have quite a sweet and captivating tune.

With 2+ million people living within the city, on paper I would expect it to feel large and possibly hectic, or crowded. But in actuality I find it quite welcoming and comfortable. There isnít a mad-rush feel at all, yet there is a vibrant productive and progressive feel in the air. This city seems to have a forward momentum carrying it into the world business theatre, and thereís plenty to spread around to itís people. Thus itís citizens have a comfortable confidence for what the future holds, there is none of the red eyed money grab feel that can be found in a burgeoning city economy. Everyone seems calm, collected, and excited about the future. Just last year, Medellin was chosen as ďThe Most Innovative CityĒ in the world, largely due to itís advances in politics, social services, and education. Last year it also won the Veronica Rudge Urbanism Award given out by Harvard University due to itís development projects within the city. The UN also selected Medellin as the city to hold their UN-Habitats 7th World Urban Forum coming up next month, and Medellin as been announced as the preferred corporate business destination in all of South America.



There are many neighborhoods as with any city. We are staying in a barrio called Envigado.



It is a desirable barrio to live in and there is a great community feel to it. As usual there are many public parks and gathering spaces.







This is a social city, if thereís free time, people are out in the public spaces socializing. There was no event here in this park, just a normal weekend afternoon.



At night, people of all ages go outside. Whether itís just out on the front stoop to sit and watch the activity, or down to the sidewalk with a glass of wine to play bridge on a collapsable table, or to the corner bar to catch up with friends, people are always out enjoying their evening. Every street has shops that turn into little bars at night, each with itís daily patrons and a handful of new folks that decided to walk in. Tables and chairs invariably merge into the streets and sidewalks as people come to chat and joke.



Most places offer generally the same thing, cheap drinks, maybe a bit of food, and lots of conversation, but some places also have themes to them. This bar is a record bar. They are chocked to the gills with old vinyl and instruments. Awesome music smooths itís way out of a classic phonograph, carefully tended by the ďDJĒ, adjusting the music to fit the ebb and flow of that nights mood.





When the old phonograph fails, they have a modern record player for back-up.



After a day of watching football on outdoor tvs in the streets and drinking at one of the neighborhood bars, wake up and go buy some Bonuelos from your favorite neighborhood panadaria (bread shop), the familiar smile and wave you get when you leave is free.



Iím absolutely loving this place, but not in a wild and exciting way. Itís like falling in love when you donít really know that itís happening. Itís subtle, comfortable, and comes on smooth. You almost donít even notice it, as you are just caught up in the atmosphere of it all, caught in the present moment. I feel like I could easily stay here, maybe find some work, and settle in for a bit. Itís comfortable here, and not in a way that any other place I have stopped in before has been. Itís unique, inspiring, and insightful. Itís livable, and in a way that no other place has been. Iím a bit remiss to keep moving, but just like any good place, there is always more to discover around the next bend, and I have only just touched the beginning of South America. Who knows, if I see more of whatís out there, and enjoy more of this journey, maybe Iíll want to come back to Medellin with even more context and appreciation. Until then, Iíll let her lie. For now, I reluctantly escape her sirens.

James and I hit the road en route for a place called Pereira. Itís in towards the famed coffee region of Colombia, which extends through the west towards the border of Ecuador for several days worth of riding.



Good coffee comes from stressed beans, and stressed beans grow at higher elevations and in tougher climates. This means good riding for us.









After cresting over some passes we drop back down towards the hotter plains and stop for some food.



The standard go to meal around here seems to be soup, with either chicken or beef in it, with a plate of rice and salad, topped off with a juice drank. This was $3.50 and considered a bit expensive.



The road continued and we enjoyed the roadside views.



There seems to be a lot of Willyís around here.



We made it into Pereira and met up with our couch surf host Daniel. He took us to a good street food joint near by and we nommed a bunch of good cheap food to introduce ourselves to this new regions food. Everywhere you go, the food changes slightly. Many places have dishes that are only found in that individual spot.





This is a ball of meat on the left, and another ball of rice, meat, and a boiled egg which has all been breaded and fried. Yep, Iíll take that please and thank you.



Daniel lives outside of town about 10 minutes on a farm/hostel. We stopped to fill his jeep up with gas along the way. I noticed something weird though, what was he doing filling a fuel tank in the hood?



He converted his shit to Ďgasí powered. As in PROPANE gas powered. Not only that, but he can just fill up at almost any gas station! He pays about $20 a week to run his jeep, and pays $500 every two years to have the system inspected. Before he said he was paying $50 every few days.





This concept, as well as the supporting technology for the conversion has been around in the states for quite a while, but the infrastructure has just never been accomplished to make it reasonable. Daniel says that itís been really popular for the last 11 years, and almost all the taxis are propane powered. The conversion is easy, and lots of people do it. He pointed to the truck next to us and said it was filling up on gas too. Well shit, come on folks up north, lets get our shit together and allow ourselves some alternative options.



We rolled in to Daniels joint, and let me tell you, heís got a pretty good life cut out for himself over here. His house/hostel/farm is of the Ďranchí style. It was his family's farm where his grandparents lived and where he spent much time while growing up. 2 years ago his grandparents passed away and the property got much less use and eventually it went up for sale. Not wanting to see it be lost or go into other hands, he asked his family if he could have it and turn it into something to share with others. They said he could have it, but it was his responsibility from that day forward, for better or for worse. What he has done with the place is quite remarkable, and I think it has great potential for the future in terms of what heís hoping it will become.











The land is beautiful and well maintained. He has great open spaces to use as he wishes, whether it be for festivals, weddings, or camping for traveling motorcyclists.







No ranch is complete without farm dogs.



With a good covered place to work and downtime to be had, we took the opportunity to get some work done on the bikes. We are both having electrical issues with our lights that need to be adjusted, and my trailtech dash still isnít working.



We did what we could to deduce what we needed, then went in to town for some food and hopefully to find the parts we didnít have to fix the bikes. This soup meal was 3,000 ling lacks, so about $1.50. Nom Nom.



In every city Iíve been in Latin America there seems to be a strip or region of town that is chock full of shops that have anything and everything you may need to fix whatever piece of machinery you may have thatís in need of fixní.



As well as someone who most certainly will know how to solve the problem. Thanks guy.



We couldnít get Jamesí light problem solved that day so we rolled back to the ranch before nightfall came.



The ranch is a nice quiet place outside of the city to lounge and have a peaceful evening, yet not far enough to make it a drag commuting to and fro.



In the morning James got back into the bike to see if he could find the problem again. I swapped out my front brakes for some freshies and also replaced my counter sprocket. I had a 16 tooth on and swapped it for a 15. She runs at a bit higher revs when on the highway but the lower gearing I think will be better for the roads here.



Around lunch Daniel took us to a local market so we could try out some weird fruits. I would name names, but I canít. Tried a lot of stuff though, and some were pretty good, and others god damn fantastic. Froggy-McFroggy-eggs here was one of the fantastic ones.





This was sweet but savory, so it was served up with salt and honey to help balance it out. Tasted sort of like yams but if they had already been cooked and sweetened up.



The place was big, we went to each floor.





This was sort of like a cherry.



This one makes you poop. We ate a couple then the vendor told Daniel not to let us eat anymore or weíll shit our pants.



The place just kept going.



This one was my favorite, but I couldnít tell you the name of it for the life of me. A bit difficult to eat because of the big pulpy seeds in the middle, but tasted great. Not Ďgreatí like wild explosions of flavor in your mouth great, but like Ďdaily-smoothie materialí great.



Full of fruit we split off from Daniel and went to where we thought we might be able to find what we needed for Jamesí bike.



From 12-2 every day most shops close up for lunch and everyone rolls out. We found a shop open that did have what we needed to fix his light though.



With the bike fixed we went around town for a bit to check it out. Pereira is much smaller than Medellin with around 400k people. Itís more of a typical city being that itís got activity and people going about their daily lives and working on the grind, but with a nicer relaxed feel to it, where everyone has some time for mid afternoon chess in between work meetings.



Tomorrow we are going to head out to a place called Salento for the day. Mainly just to spin the wheels and see another nearby spot.



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Old 03-31-2014, 05:38 AM   #340
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[/COLOR]This one makes you poop. We ate a couple then the vendor told Daniel not to let us eat anymore or weíll shit our pants.
Sometimes it's extra special to have the locals looking out for you!
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Old 04-01-2014, 05:03 AM   #341
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very nice writing, photos and documenting of your voyage. There is a difference between a traveller and a tourist and you are definitely a traveller. A traveller actively seeks out experiences whilst a tourist is passive.

Have a stop in Quito when you get here - we'd love to help you with finding the best routes, places to stay and our favorite hidden places in our favorite country...
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Old 04-01-2014, 08:24 AM   #342
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very nice writing, photos and documenting of your voyage. There is a difference between a traveller and a tourist and you are definitely a traveller. A traveller actively seeks out experiences whilst a tourist is passive.

Have a stop in Quito when you get here - we'd love to help you with finding the best routes, places to stay and our favorite hidden places in our favorite country...
Hey CourtRand, we'd love to pick your brains for a bit about the area, we'll hit you guys up when we get in.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:12 AM   #343
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69. Day Tripn' a Solento and Decision Making

After getting the bikes all squared away on maintenance over the previous few days we decided to take a day and go explore the area. Daniel told us of a place called Solento where we could spend the afternoon so we headed out that way.



Salento is a town of the smaller sorts and can be found a few miles off one of the main thoroughfares near Pereira. Itís off in the woods and the roads to it are a nice like a Sunday afternoon ride.





On the edge of town I pulled over and saw this. I was compelled to take a picture of it, but unfortunately I really have no idea what it is. A art piece, play center, conceptual origins of the species display...your guess is as good as mine.



There is a small square in town with a Cathedral as per usual.





And a statue of an important man in a conquerous pose.




Willyís jeeps here are everywhere. They are like taxiís, and may in fact be just that most of the time. If the fucking darien gap wasnít there it would be cool to buy and drive one of these all the way back up north. Cool old rigs.



If I had ever been to europe I might say that Solento has a european highland dairy cattle feel to it. James has been to europe though, and he concures.



Although small, Solento is fairly trafficked by backpackers looking to enjoy the slow small town feel with the nice green setting. Everything sells for about double the price, but everyone is kind, there are lots of trinkets to buy if you so desire, and the place has a good atmosphere.









We found a cool shop with some old skoots outside. The skoot in the back had a sign that said $.50 for a photo, I took a photo of the front skoot, so I assume I donít have to pay for that one.



I donít think the shop knew exactly what type of shop it was, because it had anything and everything that you could want for...well anything Ďoutdoorsyí I guess? Motorcycles, yep, got those. Old alpine jackets, sure thing. Bouey knives, of course. Water skis and snowboards from the 80ís, well naturally.



They even had everything you needed to go trad climbing.



Stuffed gentlemanly alligator, unfortunately only one left.



At the edge of town we spied a large set of stairs that probably lead up to a good view.



At the top we found some swings.



And the expected nice vista.



Sitting on the swings and chatting a military guy came up and started chatting as well. Nice guy, he had been working in the task force for 25 years and had a lot to say about itís history and the changes over the years. When things were rough, what the issues are now, and the general level of security. They mainly post up in towns like this and key hotbed areas to keep vigilance and make it difficult for narco traffickers to have a point of distribution/transport from the bush to the mainstream. He says that things are quite calm now in terms of conflict that affects the communities that border the bush. The main issue now is the landmines that get placed to break up the militaryís patrols, but there is far less gun fights and exchange of fire nowadays. He snapped a photo of us and some of his friends.



We asked them where they go for good cheap food around Solento and they said nowhere. Because itís so touristy everything is priced really high and the food isnít exactly typical. They recommended we take a drive over to Armenia where there was very little if not no tourism and check out the centro commercial for some bomb Ďsancochoí.

We saw on the map there was a more rural road that took us in the back way, we had no time agenda so took the turn off for it. Itís nice getting off the pavement and onto a slow dirt road rolling through farmland.





Close to Armenia we got spit back out onto tarmac and rolled towards town.





Not sure what goes on in Armenia, but thereís a fair amount of activity and people bustling about during the afternoon.



We found the Ďcentral commercialí and went looking for the Ďsancochoí.



Sancocho is like a soup with a chunk of meat on top of veggies. In each region itís prepared slightly differently, but most versions are either beef or chicken then with whatever regional flair that they may add, be it spices or different veggies. Pretty fool proof recipe, I see why itís a staple here.



With only about an hour or so needed to get back to Pereira we went to the park and watched the people go by. By peoples reactions, I get the feeling we were quite odd here, or maybe they were just wondering why we were both dressed so funny in all our motorcycle gear in the heat.


After sitting for a while and watching people come and go we realized this was a gathering spot for hookers and johns. All the working women wore some article of pink clothing and we could watch the selection process go down, both for the men approaching the women, and the women deciding if the guy was worth it or not.





Later that evening back at the ranch we soaked in the waning sun and cracked a few beers. The days been, being out riding, not doing any maintenance or trying to get anywhere, just riding and enjoying. But my head has been in a different place for most of it, as I find myself with having a decision to make.



Tomorrow we were planning to head out and on to the next spot. After Pereira we are more or less heading for the border. Yes itíll still take us a couple of weeks and yes thereís plenty more to see, but Iím torn as to whether I should go back and stay for a while longer, maybe in Medellin, maybe somewhere else. Iíve talked to James about this over the last few days and while we were in Medellin. Iíve been so intrigued by Colombia since the moment we got here that Iím considering finding work and staying longer. Iíve put out some feelers and contacted some of the distant connections I have here in Colombia, looking for non-profit work and asking them what their overall impressions are about living in Colombia. There seems to be a lot of activity going on in the field here, and all of the people Iíve spoken to have nothing but positive things to say. I feel like there is sooo much to see and discover, one could easily spend a year or more just touring around Colombia, if I slowed down and found work, I could make some money and do both. I sit on the porch in my hammock and think for a long time, pondering about what is it that I want, knowing that if I decide to stay tomorrow and turn back to Medellin, James will keep on rolling. What would I regret if I were to stop and stay? What would I regret if I were to keep moving? The technical answers come easy, but the decision as to what I prefer doesnít. Then night rolls on.



I love the people here in Colombia, there is something in the air and in the culture that I just havenít experienced before on this journey. Itís captivating, and in a way that is hard to explain. Eventually I am able to come to a conclusion though. Iíve learned many things on this trip so far, and one of those things is that no matter how much you like a place, there is always another undiscovered place, with undiscovered people, and undiscovered gems just waiting for you down the road and around the next corner. Although Iím falling hard for Colombia, thereís no reason I canít come back later. Maybe find work, maybe just to hang out for a bit longer. I want to enjoy and embrace where Iím at with no plans, but I also want to keep learning, keep exploring, and I want to keep seeing what awaits around that next bend. Instead of deciding to stop and stay, maybe go back and find work in Medellin, Iím going to instead keep moving for now, thereís lots more to see and with my limited time, it would be great to experience more of these beautiful countries. Later, after all is said and done, if I want to come back somewhere, I always can find a way to do so.

The sun is now down and I tell James Iíve decided to keep on rolling, tomorrow weíll both be headed out to Cali.


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SeanPNW screwed with this post 05-23-2014 at 09:31 AM
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:44 AM   #344
Vato Jinete
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Digging the RR.

If you leave and return, more that likely you will have a clearer understanding
of your initial infatuation with Colombia.
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Old 04-02-2014, 11:50 AM   #345
MrGoldfish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vato jinete View Post
digging the rr.

If you leave and return, more that likely you will have a clearer understanding
of your initial infatuation with colombia.
+1
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