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Old 12-08-2013, 11:03 AM   #121
SeanPNW OP
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32. San Cristobal de las Casas

I’m headed for San Cristobal de las Casas. I don’t know much about this place aside from that it’s about a days ride from where I’m at towards the Yucatan and that a German girl said “it’s really fucking cold”. With the morning happenings in Salina Cruz I wasn’t able to get onto the road until around 2pm. Not ideal for a days ride but I figured I could crank the wrist and get the click going.

The road out was more Yucatan-y, if that makes any sense. Maybe it was all in my head but it seemed as if I was obviously heading to a more historically grounded location. One where people dress more traditionally, the geography begins to turn more into rolling valley’s accented with the occasional steps, and the terrain becomes more jungle-y. I’m a scientist and these observations are solid.



I cranked out the miles throughout the afternoon and burned northeast towards San Cristobal. The road began to turn mountainous and I knew I was getting close.



The last 40 minutes was a solid grind uphill climbing higher into the thinner cooler air. I found Rossco’s Hostel in downtown San Cristobal rolled my bike in, and pulled out my cooler weather clothes. In the morning the brisk change in temperature between the oceanside town of Salina Cruz and this inland mountainous city was blunt. Another biker, Dan, from Canada pulled in the next day as well.



Rossco’s is well laid out and it has a lodge type feel to it. The staff are great, the space is nice and open, and they have an inner courtyard that you can bring your bike into.



In addition to the great staff I found two assholes here as well, Shaked and Russell. (Edit: these are my friends I met in Puerto, we hang shit on eachother, they aren’t real-life assholes. In fact, they are quite enjoyable blokes.)



We dropped back down into a warmer town to take a boat ride through a large canyon. The water in places is 200 meters deep. Mind boggling.


During the ride we saw a lot of stuff, including big crocs...



...big birds...



...big canyons…



...big waterfalls…



and two big assholes.



During the ride back our boat ran out of gas.



Shaked wasn’t amused.



We floated down the river for a bit until we saw another boat and we deployed the universal arm-waving and yelling distress call.



After several boats passed by we found one with extra fuel.



After the boat ride the three of us worked to thumb down a ride back into town. While doing so I met this guy. He had made a spear gun entirely out of spare parts and tinkered bits. I love seeing the ingenuity that goes into homemade pieces like this. He was pretty proud of it once he realized I was genuinely interested in the design. He worked through and showed me all the specifics of how he built it and what parts were difficult to make. Nice work man.





Once back in town we spent the day walking around and seeing what’s up. The town feels very laid back and similar to a ski-town. But there’s no skiing. There are lots of little shops and the air is brisk. Everyone seems to be moving about getting little tasks done as if they are prepping for the winter. Autumn is my favorite time of year and I haven’t been in a place until now that actually feels like Autumn weather. Mexico City was colder at times but there’s no nature in the city to watch change and shift into it’s winter state. Here though, the feeling of Autumn is very apparent and I’m loving walking around and soaking up the experience. I can’t place my finger on why I like autumn so much, maybe it’s the sleepy, pensive, and cozy feeling that is unavoidable this time of year. No other place has had this feeling though until San Cristobal, and here, with it’s crisp wispy afternoons, the presence of Autumn is almost palpable.







Strolling around through town we checked out some shops. Chocolate here is pretty popular and we found a good shop with all homemade bits for $.50 a pop.



These guys are so dry and boring to hang out with, really difficult to have fun with them.



Feeling victorious with our chocolate find we went looking for a vantage point to drink it from and scope out the rest of the city.



A group of kids were training for soccer/football by running up and down the stairs.



We sat, sipped our drinks, admired the city, and soaked in the cold nights air. It’s a freshening feeling after being in the sweaty heat for a few days. It’s a climate that I’m much more familiar with being from the Pacific Northwest and reminded me a lot of Autumn in Seattle.



When the sun comes out in the late morning things do heat up. The next day Russell and I headed out to a larger market on the outskirts of town where all the locals shop.



There’s lots of fruit to buy here and it’s super cheap, and super delicious. 4 oranges total up to 6 pesos (~$.50)



Items are usually weighed out by the kilo. The grapes are very sugary, almost too sugary if you aren’t used to how rich they are.



Lots of spices and other items for sale as well.



From the market we caught a bus to go to a small neighboring town that was supposed to be fairly untouched by tourists. Here we hoped we could find some more traditional dress and hopefully sample a local drink that we heard is made only here called Polsch.



The van was tight but this allowed us to shoot the shit with the locals and ask questions. Most were pretty untalkative as this is a more traditional area we were headed to and they seemed more cold or unfriendly towards the attention that us foreign travelers brought to their peaceful and traditional culture.



One mother and her son though were really open and we talked with them for the entire ride. The kid was 5 and really spry and definitely clicked on to the world around him. We asked him if he liked living in the small town where we were going and he said he loved it. He said that’s where all his friends are and that he has everything he needs in the town. We told him that his friends are important and he responded saying “Yeah they are, I don’t want to lose them”. For a 5 year old he’s very tuned in. The honesty that little kids have and the ease of thought that they bring with their answers is refreshing. As we get older we have so much more shit and experiences that we accrue throughout our lives tumbling around in our brains. Everytime we go to make a decision or respond to something we consult all of these experiences subconsciously, aggregate a conclusion and then respond or move forward with that idea. A child though has nothing to clutter up their thought process, it’s much more linear and direct. As an adult we like to hope that with our accumulated experiences we can make more educated decisions about the world around us, but this isn’t always the case. Sometimes I prefer the straightforward simplicity of a kids thought process.



The center of town is pretty much all of town.



Of course there is a central plaza as well as a church.



We checked out the local market. It was pretty empty and dead as it only really serves the local community and it was the middle of the afternoon on a weekday. You aren’t supposed to take pictures of the traditionally dressed people here because apparently they really don’t like it. I felt a little guilty but I did unscrupulously snap a photo of one of the local women. The majority of the women I saw were dressed like this.



Back outside in the plaza I also ashamedly snapped a shot of a bunch of men walking through town. There was a rank system to who could wear what. It seemed like the elder men or more highly ranked men wore black skins (not sure what animal?) and the others wore white.



Next to the church we saw several of the traditionally dressed men sitting in a small tienda in the plaza sipping a clear liquid. We realized this was the Polsch that we had heard about and been in search of. We sat down at a table next to them, said the customary apologies for the intrusion, and ordered some of our own to drink. The guy poured us some crystal clear liquid out of a plastic bottle and we sat down to enjoy some afternoon R&R. The liquor smelt really strong. It had a unique smell, but one that I can’t really describe. Similar to Vodka or Mescal but maybe something in between the two. I liked it and we put back a few.



We had met some other travelers from Austria and France on the way into the town so we grabbed some tacos with them before heading back. The tacos were 3 pesos each. I ate 9, trying several of each kind they had.



We crammed 6 people into a 4 person taxi for the ride back to San Cristobal and chatted about the interesting day in this interesting pueblo. When back in town we checked out the main plaza to see what they had going on. Today is Hanukkah so they had a menorah and free donuts (sorry Shaked I forgot what you called them).



We rounded out the night in a small bar huddled around a fire, sipping mescal and listening to live music. San cristobal you have been a nice treat and I have really appreciated having a place that feels like autumn to enjoy for a couple days. Not sure where I’m going next, but I’m glad I got to feel a bit of the season before going back into the tropics.



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Old 12-08-2013, 05:11 PM   #122
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Thanks for the nice read and pics on a cold wet day in Va USA.
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:16 PM   #123
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Thanks for the nice read and pics on a cold wet day in Va USA.
Glad you are enjoying, hopefully I won't have much rain to post about
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:17 PM   #124
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So why were the companions 'ass holes'? Were they too much like Americans? Please elaborate. I had an encounter in Baja near Bay Of LA with a bunch of rude A whale watcher Americanos. It was embarrassing to be an American.

Always here Sean. Applause applause.
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:43 PM   #125
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So why were the companions 'ass holes'? Were they too much like Americans? Please elaborate. I had an encounter in Baja near Bay Of LA with a bunch of rude A whale watcher Americanos. It was embarrassing to be an American.

Always here Sean. Applause applause.
Should have specified, my humor is to berate those that I enjoy. For example, "Russell and Shaked are shitty terrible people and I hate their company" is better translated to "they are pretty rad dudes". So nope they are quite fine gentleman indeed, we just like to hang shit on each other day-in and day-out.
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:44 PM   #126
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33. Tonina Ruins, A Childhood Dream Realized

Itís just now sunrise and Iím already on the road. Early bird gets the worm right? Iím bundled up in thick riding gear, I canít feel much of whatís around me, but the air that passes through the front vents in my helmet tastes crisp and cold. The sun is cresting over the surrounding hills, sending light crackling through the tree branches and onto the road. At a leisurely pace I roll my bike into the smooth corners, one after the other waking my body up and smoothing out the pace of the motor. I pass through wisps of smoke, the smell of wood burning fires cooking breakfast fill my helmet. Itís beautiful here in the Yucatan. Peaceful and quiet.



As a little kid I grew up on National Geographic magazines. Sitting crosslegged on my grandparents floor I would pour through the endless volumes, dating all the way back to the very first editions. I would skim the bindings which contained the topics of that volume, waiting for interesting words to jump out at me. ďpolar bearsĒ, ďthe serengetiĒ, ďredwood forests hidden secretsĒ, etc. Without fail several times a year there would be a topic on the ancient civilizations of Latin America. If I was lucky it would be a special print with big flip out charts and maps of their ancient cities. I loved these volumes and would spend hours late into the night enchanted by the information they dispelled. To this day the childhood fascination of everything that involves these ancient cultures is just as strong. Today, I was up and on the road early, excited to see one of those ancient places first hand.

The scenery along the way is green and there are many farms and small forests dotting the landscape.



In between the farms and forests there are small pueblos.



Some, as with many other small towns, have a central sculpture signifying something important from the past.



As the sun was heating up the countryside I stopped for a pee and to take a couple layers off. I assumed it was too early for people to be out and about so didnít go further than right next to my bike.



Should have known that people work very hard here, as right then 3 guys came out of the forest hauling big slabs of wood and stacking it next to where I was. Judging by the size of the pile they had been working for several hours. We were mutually interested in the oddity of each others random appiration and spoke for a bit. They told me about the Yucatan and good places to go see before heading back into the forest to haul out more wood.



I kept on riding, pushing northeast towards the town of Ocosingo, where I would find the Tonina ruins.



About an hour later I found the town then veered south east 10 miles out to the ruins.



The road out was perfect, not for riding, but for the scenery. I like these slow paced backroads through farms. Maybe it reminds me of where I grew up? Or maybe I just like the smell of cow shit.





There is no pomp and circus here. I came to these ruins because I heard that they are very under populated because of their relatively remote location, yet still a great medium-large sized representation of an ancient Mayan civilization. To me this means that there will be less rules, less people, and a much more powerful experience to hit you right in the feels. As I rolled up to the entrance, I felt like I was entering someones farm. Maybe they would ask me in for some mescal before seeing the ruins?



I paid my 46 pesos (~$4) and walked down the lane that lead to where the ruins where. Here I got my first glimpse of them.



I walked through a small forest, crossed a little stream, and then found myself on the footsteps of an ancient powerhouse for the Mayan people.



The site was very quiet with only 3 other tourists milling about. The only sound being the faint stacking of rocks as workers cleared and reconstructed areas of the ruins. At the base of the central plaza there are two ballcourts. This particular Mayan site was the home of a particularly powerful group of mayans that were notoriously violent and at war constantly. Sculptures of the torsos of 6 captured rival king's vassals are used as markers for the ballcourt.



Looking up at the ruins you can see the workers on the left for scale.





This is at the base as you I first began to climb up.



The steps are steep and no rails exist. You can see the workers on the left clearing debris.



There are a series of terraces each with differing significances and uses.



As I work my way up I find different spaces with different items to see. All are approachable and itís remarkable how open and accessible this place is to the average meanderer. What if I was drunk and took a wrong step? You could easily tumble to the bottom, or decide to bring a brick back home. Guess thatís the perk of going to an underdeveloped site.











As I get towards the top I find another asshole (said with love) perched on top. Hey Russell!



Looking down from the top you can see in every direction. This city used to be immense, itís people and surrounding towns spreading far into the valley. They think they have only uncovered about %20 of it.





Looking behind the peak that Iím standing on, you can see lots of jungle. The entire ridgeline in this picture, is actually other ruins that they havenít uncovered yet. They say the Yucatan is full of places like this, just waiting to be dug out of the jungle that has consumed them.



I climbed up on the highest point that I could and sat there in awe. I couldnít stop saying ďwowÖ..Ē to myself. Over and over again I was kicked in the head with the reality of this drastic place, the sheer awe of the culture, and the fact that I had finally made it here after all these years and on my own accord.



I soaked it all in for as long as I could. I feel lucky enough to have had a couple brief moments in my life where I had hoped to experience something for many years and then finally was able to do it. This goal was a long time coming, from childhood until now, and today, at this place, I was able to add it to the list. Itís a great feeling of accomplishment, one that leaves me feeling very satisfied, yet as with all accomplished goals, also looking to whatís next.
















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Old 12-10-2013, 05:54 PM   #127
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34. Kicking It In Bacalar

After visiting the tonina ruins I hit up some waterfalls before making it into Palenque shortly after dark. There was a road washout which caused a bit of delay but no real problems. There are some pretty famous ruins in Palenque which make it a touristy little spot with big groups of people from China and Russia milling about. After such a great experience at Tonina I didnít have much interest for the hoards at Palenque so I slept the night and then pushed out of town in the AM. I heard that a place called Bacalar further north up the coast towards Cancun is supposed to be pretty chill. I like the sound of this so I pointed my bike that way. Russell said he might be heading that way as well so we figured we would bump into each other there at some point.

The road from Palenque up the coast towards Bacalar really isnít that great if you are a motorcyclist. Itís well maintained, groomed, and even had quite a bit of improvements underway, but it was just really boring. Straight, flat, every now and then a curve thrown in. All good though, canít have awesome roads everyday, they wouldn't be special then now would they.



To break up the monotony I stopped for some food and downed a small well cooked chicken..



Came across a sign I had never seen before. The speed through here dropped from 110 to 40 because of bats. Didnít see any though, was hoping for something out of an Alfred Hitchcock flick for entertainment.



Every now and then Iíd come cruising into a town. Usually slamming into the first speed bump that indicates thereís a town coming up at speed and then slowing down for the rest of them. They sure get your attention if you werenít paying any before.



As I was exiting a small pueblo I went cruising past a sweet custom chopper. I shot the kid a big thumbs up but then just had to double back to get a better look. This thing was the definition of ďchopperĒ. Every piece on it had been chopped off of something else to build it. The rear tire was a radial from a small car and the swingarm had been adjusted to fit it. The exhaust was held on with bailing wire and there was a harley davidson sticker on the crank case. The kid that had been riding was stoked I was so in to it but didnít understand why I liked it. He asked arenít there way cooler choppers in the US? I answered that yeah, there are lots of cool choppers. But it takes so much more ingenuity and creativity to make on out of the limited materials that he did. In the US you can just jump online, make a few clicks on ebay, and bam you got a chopper. To go to the effort he did to make this bike was much more in line with the ideas of creating a chopper, and thus I thought his was just as rad.



One of the kids friends showed up as well and then they asked a lot of questions about my bike. I told them I just chopped and modified it until I had what I wanted as well. Same process, just easier because lots of parts are readily available to modify with. They invited me to come kick it with their friends but I needed to get going as it was getting dark. I followed my GPS into town where I had mapped a hostel out to be. Apparently it was incorrect as it lead me into a weird part of town that wasnít even in Bacalar, but in the much larger city of Chetumal about 20 clicks before Bacalar. I asked a drunk man in the alley if there was a hostel anywhere in this area of town and he looked really surprised. He said there arenít any hostels here, just lots of bandidos with machetes that would slit my throat for my bike, or shoot me if I was lucky. He gave me wobbly and slurred directions on the best way to get out of the area and back towards a better part of town. I got the feeling that there werenít any hostels here, but not that it was a particularly sketchy area, in either case I took his advised route back out and went looking for the center of town where I knew I could find a place to stay the night. After checking in with a few hotels that were way out of my budget (60 bones a night is just not gonna cut it) I went looking for something more economical. I asked some locals where cheep places to stay are with no luck. Found the bus station so that I could ask some cabbies where all the dirtbag backpackers stay and they werenít any help either. Eventually I ran into someone who knew of a hostel and was kind enough to ring them up and find out where they were located for me. Thanks again random dude with a cute boxer pup. I found the place easy peasy lemon squeezy after that and called it a night.

The next day a short jaunt up the road I came into Bacalar and found the place I had originally been looking for on the northeast corner of town, Magic Cabanas.



They have camping here and I set up my tent for the first time since Baja. Found some La Paz sand wrapped up with it as well.



Itís a cool place with everything being open air and the atmosphere is laid back. It was still 100 pesos a night to camp though which seemed expensive for camping. Apparently itís officially the Ďhighí season now though, as last week it was 40 pesos cheaper to camp. Still a decent price though at around $8 per night. This area of Mexico, Quintana Roo, is known for being one of the most expensive as well so I guess it is to be expected.







After getting my shit squared away, I knew I needed to get my priorities straightened out as well. Time to find the local taco stand and see what we are working with here in Bacalar. The one I settled on is King Camaron.



This spot looked the most taco-stand-y and my sniffer had a hunch it was the place to grub down. I chatted with the owner/chef Tony for a bit and he told me the camaron tacos are his specialty. They had just opened up here a week ago and business had been slow. With these places itís a word of mouth game. He has opened one of these stands in several other locations around beach towns over the last decade. This is his new attempt. After tasting the food, it is the best prepared and tastefully (pun intended) balanced shrimp taco I have had. The bread and batter is the perfect density and texture, and the shrimp is cooked just long enough to put it in that delicate range of firmness. If you arenít a fan of creme though, go somewhere else, as the taco is first based on some sort of cream sauce, then also topped with some creme. If you are a chipotle fan, stay seated and ask for the sauces, because his chipotle sauce is a killer complement to the tacos. They have a great menu, or at least it had a lot of other stuff on it besides tacos. I canít comment on the other items though because Iím a creature of habit and tried nothing else besides those god damn delicious shrimp tacos. Went back again the next day and couldnít bring myself to risk ordering anything else.



After eating some tacos I went to check out the town. Itís a small place and mostly locals with some mexicano summer homes there. The roads are slow and windy as they fan out along the coast from the center of town.



Houses line the water, some are small and quaint, some are large and elaborate.







The center of town, as always, has a plaza, garden, and some sort of large circular cabana for people to gather in.



In addition to the plaza, this small town is also sporting fort. Back in the day this place used to get sacked by pirates periodically. The town would roll on into the fort for safety and ride out the tomfoolery and blast away at the pirates via canon fire.



Nowadays though life is a lot easier around here. When not slamming tacos into my face there is cenote swimming to be hadÖ



Local art hunting to be doneÖ



Local Amish spotting (donít know why they insist on wearing the denim suites in the heat down here, does their religion say anything about having to wear overalls?)Ö



And some pics with cop bikes to be snapped. This looked like a KLR, sounded like a KLR, but was in fact a Chino. Everything is Kawasaki in itís parts and design, but stamped out by the Chino motorcycle company. The cop seemed pretty displeased with the bike as he described it. I told him not to worry as there is an enormous aftermarket part market should the department wish to upgrade anything, you could basically build an entirely new bike :-)



Itís nice to snag the morning sun out on the lagoon too.



Bring your own chair though as the local birds usually have first dibs on the ones out there.





If you dip in the water you can save the $100 dollar spa treatment and have the little fish groom your body instead.



Good crew here with fun people. Russell excluded of course (on left).



Where to next? I am antsy to head south, I think Iíll go kick it with the the guys in one more spot before pushing on. Tulum? Yeah letís do that.



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Old 12-11-2013, 02:05 PM   #128
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freakin awesome! i can remember thumbing through my grandparents piles of National Geographic as well, thank you for bringing that memory back to me.

looking forward to the next installment!
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TAT-2013: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=913898
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:09 PM   #129
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freakin awesome! i can remember thumbing through my grandparents piles of National Geographic as well, thank you for bringing that memory back to me.

looking forward to the next installment!
NG has been doing it right since the start, if I was stuck on a desert island I would want a knife, a cast iron pan, and a NG subscription.

*and maybe a boat
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Old 12-11-2013, 08:22 PM   #130
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35. Time To Get Out Of Dodge

Alright, this Mexico place has turned out to be pretty rad. Itís much bigger than I had previously thought and in pretty much every way. Itís culture, people, food, scenery, insert whatever you want here, etc has all but blown me away. I came into Mexico knowing that I should expect the unexpected, but spending the last 2.5 months here I have come to appreciate Mexico in ways that I couldnít have predicted I would before. I could easily spend another couple months here working my way further through the Yucatan and then back down into the South, but there will always be more to see no matter where you go, and itís about damn time I put the Mexico Kool-aid down and try out another fucking country! I had planned to go to Tulum before and meet up with Shaked and Russell for one last spot so I blasted 2 hours further up the coast and met up with them.

The road up North is just as straight and boring as the road to Bacalar. Yucatan is both gorgeous and fascinating for many reasons, itís coastal roads though do not appear to be among those reasons if you have been graced by the rollercoaster embrace of the tarmac beauties in Oaxaca or Chiapas beforehand.



Tulum is a beach town with Mayan ruins and itís on the main eastern beach drag that leads up to Cancun and Playa del Carmen. Itís still an hour or so from either though so it really just gets the tourist run-off from those places. Here diving and beaches are the name of the game so the shops are stocked accordingly.



The beachtown activity of chasing women is also in high season, here Shaked demonstrates the Ďchase and approachí phase with Jaz.



To cut back on costs we cooked a few of our own meals and opted to Ďdrink-iní rather than out. When a Litre of beer purchased at the corner store tienda only costs $2 it makes paying double that for a single beer at a bar sound like crazy talk.





The name of the game here is beach hopping and cenote dropping. There are many of both to be had and the options branch out both north and south along the coast. Here we went to a beach where there were lots of turtles in the water to chase. There were also lots of tourists in life vests to watch try and chase them.





The people watching was good so we lounged the afternoon here and swam looking for turtles to ogle at.



Iím still a ginger though and am built to burn, I tend to opt for the shady spots when not in the water.



Having a bike sure makes jumping up and down to the different beaches easy. Hey there bike, I love you.



Iím getting antsy though so itís time to get outa here. The crew at the hostel in Tulum were cool, and kicking it with Shaked and Russell is always a fun time, but I gotta role. Iím too close to the border and all I can think about is if Mexico is this cool, what could the other countries be like?? Time to find out. Catch you two cheeky bastards later.



After sitting in the front lobby and dancing around with when the sky looked the least threatening for rain I decided to say fuck it and just get on the road. About 30 minutes into the ride south towards the border town of Chetumal an ocean decided to be drained and dumped from above.



Bike actually shut off again while clicking down the highway in this mess. Jus like it did the last time I was riding in heavy rain. It couldnít have been raining for longer than 2 minutes though (albeit very heavily) so it leads me to believe that something else is happening rather than water getting into the carb, maybe I have an exposed wire that is killing my spark when it getís wet? Or water dripping down my choke cable into the carb (this happened before back in Seattle a couple times while the bike was parked in the rain with the cable loose). Hmmm, Iíll have allot some helmet time to ponder that one.

The rain comes and goes here so the next time it dumped I tested out dropping the speed back and that seemed to help but she still ran like she was fairly underpowered (even for a KLR :-)). Maybe itís just all the humidity in the air thatís making her run weird...for the third bout of torrential rain I decided to just take shelter in a palapa until the heavy part rolled over.



At least itís just wet, rather than wet and cold. The weather is so nice here that it feels like you are taking a shower while riding a motorcycle rather than sitting in a wet freezer box like some other places. With all the delays I got into Chetumal around dark. Gotta have the priorities straight so before finding a hostel I found some fucking TACOS. The ladies cooking at the taco stand wanted a photo so I obliged. If the photo looks odd and scrunched itís because it is. These lovely ladies had to have been 3 ft tall and I was basically kneeling to get in the photo. Thanks for the great pork tacos ladies.



The La Posada Chetumal Hostel has convenient and secure gated parking in their front area if anyone is rolling through.



Itís now high-season though and a dorm bed is $170 pesos!! Thatís around $15. Thatís crazy talk but Chetumal is close to the border so Iím biting the bullet. Iíve been asking every person I meet if theyíve ever been to Belize or Guatemala in an attempt to get some info about where Iíll be going tomorrow. I havenít been able to get a ton of info via my preferred method of just asking folks so I jumped on the web. Looks to me like Belize is pricey, potentially dangerous in the south side of Belize city and the capitol (this is always so subjective though and via the typed out words on the internet I canít get a good gauge for the writers danger-bar, hence why I prefer asking real people in person), and is is a place that has some amazing diving. I donít have my dive permit though so I think Iím going to jump right on through and just transit Belize into Guatemala. Shit, looking at info on Guatemala now and Iím excited. itís a whole new land of places and culture to explore. How am I ever going to get to south america? I feel like a kid in a grown-up candy shop that canít decide what he wants to try because everything sounds great. This travel thing sure is a great time and opportunity, the second you want to experience something new you can just turn the key and go find it. Tomorrow morning Iíll turn the key and see what I can find in Guatemala.




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Old 12-12-2013, 11:20 AM   #131
vintagespeed
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i've never owned a KLR, but i've had similar issues with my DR in the wet.

what i found is that the float bowl vent line hanging down under the bike sucks up water into the bowl, thus fouling your fuel and running like shit. i also had that line plug up after washing the bike, the dirt in the line turned to mud and blocked it 100%. turned a great running bike that always started every time into an unpredictable, miserable bitch that wouldn't run right or idle.

fuel floats on water, so next time just turn that bowl drain & let the water out. check your vent line routing and maybe move them around or add a disposable filter to the bowl vent.
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TAT-2013: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=913898
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Old 12-12-2013, 11:55 AM   #132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagespeed View Post
i've never owned a KLR, but i've had similar issues with my DR in the wet.

what i found is that the float bowl vent line hanging down under the bike sucks up water into the bowl, thus fouling your fuel and running like shit. i also had that line plug up after washing the bike, the dirt in the line turned to mud and blocked it 100%. turned a great running bike that always started every time into an unpredictable, miserable bitch that wouldn't run right or idle.

fuel floats on water, so next time just turn that bowl drain & let the water out. check your vent line routing and maybe move them around or add a disposable filter to the bowl vent.
Yup.
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Old 12-12-2013, 01:37 PM   #133
Ruckusment
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Thumb Loving it!

If you are headed to Tulum, which is the only coastal Mayan city and amazing, be sure to check out Coba too. I think it would be way more your speed: I think only 30% of it is uncovered, it's in true jungle, you can rent a totally thrashed rust covered bike for $2 and cruise for hours, and you can climb on everything because they haven't even found everything.

Wishing I was down there with you man, the beer freezes in the can when hiking the North Cascades.

Good luck man, keep living the dream.

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Old 12-12-2013, 01:43 PM   #134
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Nvm

Nevermind, you are definitely well past where I was talking about. Regardless though your trip is looking amazing, I look forward to your posts, so much so that it is the only one that I have ever had send me email notifications to remind me. You are that important!
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Old 12-13-2013, 05:52 PM   #135
SeanPNW OP
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Location: Somewhere in Latin America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagespeed View Post
i've never owned a KLR, but i've had similar issues with my DR in the wet.

what i found is that the float bowl vent line hanging down under the bike sucks up water into the bowl, thus fouling your fuel and running like shit. i also had that line plug up after washing the bike, the dirt in the line turned to mud and blocked it 100%. turned a great running bike that always started every time into an unpredictable, miserable bitch that wouldn't run right or idle.

fuel floats on water, so next time just turn that bowl drain & let the water out. check your vent line routing and maybe move them around or add a disposable filter to the bowl vent.
Yeah first thing I did was drain the bowl both times this happened. The bike started up again the first time this happened a couple weeks ago, but this time I don't think it was raining long enough for this to have accumulated any water that way (only had been raining for 30 seconds, albeit very hard). I did drain it though and oddly it didn't start back up like the other week. Ended up tipping the bike onto it's side seeing if maybe there was any water somewhere pooling I could dump it. The bike did start after this magical gesture but there's no saying that's what actually did it.

I have a 'Y' splitter with a re-route for the carb vent line up under the seat so hopefully that shouldn't be the problem either. Definitely odd. Not a big issue as it's only happened twice though. Yesterday I rode in the pissing rain most of the day but as long as I kept it under 55mph no tomfoolery was had. I'm gonna take a look at my hoses down there though and see if anything else could be letting water into the airbox and thus the carb.
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