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Old 09-28-2013, 06:01 PM   #46
ME 109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
The o ring.
No they're not. You're just playing payback.

Fat high or fat wide o ring?
If I get a fat high one, I'll go through more oil.
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Old 09-28-2013, 06:04 PM   #47
disston
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O-rings are round. It's why they are called OOH-rings. They are the same size width and height.

The flats on the threaded portion of the dip stick are probably a manufacturing feature.
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Old 09-28-2013, 07:17 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by disston View Post
O-rings are round. It's why they are called OOH-rings. They are the same size width and height.
Quite right disston, quite right.
While on the subject, how often should one replace the squarering in the oil filter cover on the thermostat equipped models?
I fear mine may have become rectangularring.
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Old 09-28-2013, 07:22 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by batoutoflahonda View Post
This is an OBSERVATION only.

I have been trying to get the oil pump cover on my G/S to seal for a few years now (leaves a couple drops on the ground). Every time I go in for a spline lube, clutch change, etc. I change the "O" ring, last couple times I have used Honda bond around the periphery of the cover. That would hold for about 2 to 3 thousand miles. I had been using Valvoline 20-50. And have used Mobile 1 synthetic, or whatever I could get. On long trips where I'm going to be on the road for weeks in high temps and doing 12hr days, I will put synthetic in it.

Now the point. Last summer I put AmsOil in as it was all the local Napa had. The oil leak stopped. Switched back to Valvoline, leak returned. Back to Amsoil, it stopped. So I am wondering if AmsOil has an ingredient that swells seals. Has any one else experienced this with oil brands? I have read that some oils use seal "conditioners". Some don't, and from what I've dug up Amsoil is one that doesn't?

Any way. Going to try a new cover this year. Still not convinced it's not just an anomaly, machines just don't work that way.
I'd think about polishing the cover with sandpaper on a piece of plate glass. This would increase the clamping pressure on the o-ring. I'd also have a look at the oil pressure.

My research on synthetic oils is pretty old, but IIRC, there are two synthetic base oils. One causes seals to swell and the other causes them to shrink. The blender of the oil makes a choice of mixture of them, so different brands may behave differently.
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:56 PM   #50
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I'd think about polishing the cover with sandpaper on a piece of plate glass. .
Not sure if there is variation from one cover to another but I noticed on my cover that there was precious little o ring sitting above the machined face of the cover.
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Old 09-28-2013, 11:31 PM   #51
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Not sure if there is variation from one cover to another but I noticed on my cover that there was precious little o ring sitting above the machined face of the cover.
Put a spacer under it. Either a regular o-ring spacer if one is available in the proper size, or a metal shim. But the cover has to bottom out, metal to metal. The o-ring cannot prevent that. This is why I would avoid sealant. The cover to rotor gap should not be increased. You can use the thinnest smear of colored grease against a spotless mating surface to check the contact.

You could also see if the o-ring can be sourced elsewhere. Go for viton. They may run in the upper end of the tolerance range.
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Old 09-29-2013, 02:10 PM   #52
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It has bolts. I will check it for flatness when I pull it next. Kinda leery about making it flat. The clearance for the pump gears is kinda critical. But if it's not too bad.
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Old 09-30-2013, 05:09 AM   #53
Plaka
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Originally Posted by ME 109 View Post
No they're not. You're just playing payback.

Fat high or fat wide o ring?
If I get a fat high one, I'll go through more oil.
I'm sorry, I misread your post. I believe you've been sooooo paid back it's your turn anyway.

I believe Disston is correct. Look at the flats very closely. You will see a very fine rib. it runs all the way around the head. This is the parting line of the mold. it's an insert molding. The steel dipstick is clamped in the mold and the metal or plastic is shot around it. But you always get that rib at the parting line where a bit of material leaks between the halves of the mold. Sometimes its a thin flange called "flash". The molding machine operator makes a fast pass with a scraper to clean this up (knock it down to a small rib) as the mold is cycling the next parts. BUT, if it runs through the threads you have to chase it with a die. Too slow. The mold processes several parts at once and you need to be able to clean them up before the next batch comes out and cools. So, you put a flat there. Then you can hit it quickly with a scraper.


If you look at a plastic handled one, you will see two small circles up on the finger grip. These are the ejector pins to push the part out of the mold. They are not using them on the metal ones (although it is done). Here I doubt they worried about the flash in the threads so no flats. Screwing it into the aluminum will wipe them off.

On the /5 dipstick there are no flats. it's been chased with a die. You can see the parting line heading into the first few threads then taper out. You can do this with a two piece chasing die. It is the full height of the threads. You clamp it around the threads so the flash is in one of the hollows between the cutting teeth then give it a twist to take off the flash. They probably got tired of doing this.
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Old 09-30-2013, 05:48 AM   #54
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Lets face it cross threading becomes an increasing possibility as thread diameter goes up so is that what the flats are for to help initial thread engagement ?

I'm not sure if they help or hinder. Regardless they don't in any way affect sealing with an O ring on mine. The plastic ones are designed for an O ring so surely there shouldn't be a problem there either if the correct O ring is used.
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:37 AM   #55
Plaka
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Lets face it cross threading becomes an increasing possibility as thread diameter goes up so is that what the flats are for to help initial thread engagement ?

I'm not sure if they help or hinder. Regardless they don't in any way affect sealing with an O ring on mine. The plastic ones are designed for an O ring so surely there shouldn't be a problem there either if the correct O ring is used.
if cross threading were an issue then the plastic ones would have flats---and wouldn't be plastic.

I agree on the o-ring inlet into the plastic ones---but only it you're using the right oil.
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