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Old 09-18-2013, 04:59 PM   #1
brian72 OP
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Question Yamaha YX600 Radian (Gas Question)?

I'v been around bikes for some time now but the inline 4 cylinder is new to me. My question is...

If the petcock on a gravity fed inline 4 in left on, does the fuel get into the oil? I was told you have to change the oil as the gas will overflow (somehow) and mix with the oil.

Is this true? My new to me bike is a 1988 Yamaha YX600 Radian. I'm looking to keep it running well.

Thank you.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:15 PM   #2
kraven
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It can.

Just turn the fuel to the off position when you pull in somewhere.

Mental check list goes like:
stop
neutral
fuel off
kill switch to off
sidestand out

If you forget the fuel is off, you'll know in about 200 feet.

I had a Radian last winter as a salty weather bike. I wish I'd never sold it. Beautiful parts bin 80's bike that there aren't many of left functioning.

Just get used to turning off the fuel. Riders did that for decades. It's not that hard.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:21 PM   #3
2whl-hoop
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I believe the Radian has a vacuum petcock, and it won't flow gas when the motor isn't running unless it is left in the prime position. If your letting it sit for a long time then I would shut the petcock off as a precaution, but overnight or for a few days I wouldn't worry about it.

If gas is in the oil, that's another story, and I would change the oil, but I would figure out how it happened. Either the petcock was left in prime or it's worn out and needs replacing.

It's been nearly 25 years since I had a Radian, but I don't recall ever shutting the fuel off except for long term storage.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:40 PM   #4
JerryH
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The Radian does have a vacuum petcock, and under normal circumstances, it does not need to be turned off. It only flows fuel when the engine is running. However, vacuum petcocks can cause a lot of problems, and it is not really the fault of the petcock, but the ethanol gas they have now. It melts the rubber parts in the petcock, and causes them to leak. The leak is usually at the petcock itself. The float needle valves in the carbs will prevent the carbs form overflowing even if a manual petcock is left on. They seem to hold up to ethanol better than the rubber parts in the petcock. I believe you can get a Pingle manual petcock for the Radian if you are having problems with the oem one.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:52 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kraven View Post
It can.

Just turn the fuel to the off position when you pull in somewhere.

Mental check list goes like:
stop
neutral
fuel off
kill switch to off
sidestand out

If you forget the fuel is off, you'll know in about 200 feet.

I had a Radian last winter as a salty weather bike. I wish I'd never sold it. Beautiful parts bin 80's bike that there aren't many of left functioning.

Just get used to turning off the fuel. Riders did that for decades. It's not that hard.

Just get used to turning off the fuel. Riders did that for decades. It's not that hard. I totally agree with that one, but keep in mind that riders used carbs for more than a century. Some, like the Amal, did have problems, but most of the later ones were trouble free, and also easy and cheap to work on. Yet today everybody wants almost impossible (and VERY expensive to work on) fuel injection, the most common reasons being that you can start them without a choke, and they do not need to be warmed up. Only an idiot would take off without completely warming up their engine anyway. The
minuscule functional gains you get from FI do not even begin to justify the added complexity and cost.
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Old 09-18-2013, 06:08 PM   #6
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Old 09-18-2013, 06:27 PM   #7
brian72 OP
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I do appreciate the petcock advice about turning it off.

I had a bad petcock and just replaced it. Over the last 48 hrs it apparently leaked into the carbs. Flooded with fuel I managed to start it, but some (by some I mean a lot of) fuel spilled over in the process. Also I just changed the oil. Should I be concerned that fuel got into the engine oil?

Thank you.
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Old 09-18-2013, 07:36 PM   #8
radianrider
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I'd be checking. Small price to pay for ensuring proper lubrication while running.

Had a Radian (otherwise my username would make little sense,) but sold it years ago. Fun bike.
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Old 09-19-2013, 12:34 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brian72 View Post
I do appreciate the petcock advice about turning it off.

I had a bad petcock and just replaced it. Over the last 48 hrs it apparently leaked into the carbs. Flooded with fuel I managed to start it, but some (by some I mean a lot of) fuel spilled over in the process. Also I just changed the oil. Should I be concerned that fuel got into the engine oil?

Thank you.
Yes. You should be concerned.
As JerryH mentioned, gasoline in most pumps includes ethanol at a minimum 10% concentration. That's enough to break up all the sludge in the engine and catch it in the oil pump screen or clog the filter, break the filter media, etc and it doesn't even need that much run time to do it. And it's just bad mojo to have diluted oil.

Check the oil level, smell the oil to check for gasoline smell. If it's higher than it should be or smells of gasoline, change it and change the filter.

Otherwise you can lunch the engine.

Remember this bike is over 2 decades old. Parts are aging and aren't what they used to be, like carb floats and whatnot. Just because it shouldn't do something doesn't mean it won't. It's getting old. When you get old, you'll be feeble and leaky too.
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Old 09-19-2013, 01:11 PM   #10
Dilligaf0220
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A petcock won't flood carbs and dump gas into the sump all by itself if left on. The floats in the carb need to be stuck as well. Turning off a manual petcock is insurance against a carb getting stuck open.

For gas to get into the oil sump you need neglected carbs, and for the petcock to be open. If you are spilling gas, your carbs need to be pulled & cleaned, and float level checked.
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Old 09-19-2013, 10:58 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brian72 View Post
I'v been around bikes for some time now but the inline 4 cylinder is new to me. My question is...

If the petcock on a gravity fed inline 4 in left on, does the fuel get into the oil? I was told you have to change the oil as the gas will overflow (somehow) and mix with the oil.

Is this true? My new to me bike is a 1988 Yamaha YX600 Radian. I'm looking to keep it running well.

Thank you.
The petcock on my '89 Radian is vacuum-operated, with no OFF position. I don't think it's easy to replace with a different petcock either, because it's part of the tank shroud.

I use Sea Foam in my Radian regularly and have no fuel problems. Check your oil level before every ride. If the level looks high, or if you see a clearer liquid floating in the crankcase, you might have fuel in it.
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Old 09-20-2013, 04:53 PM   #12
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I have a new petcock on.

Emptied the bowls and shot cleaner into them. Tapped the bolws with a screw driver (in hopes to unstick any stuck float).

Next I will change the oil and take it for an aprox 100 mile ride with carb cleaner in the tank.

Man I hope this works I really don't look forward to removing those carbs, but if it has to be done, it has to be done.

The more I've researched the more I am convinced it's a carb problem.

So...wish me luck that my half assed attempts work.

I do appreciate the trouble shooting advice and will follow up on what happens next.
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Old 09-20-2013, 08:33 PM   #13
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Even if the petcock is leaking, fuel will not get into the crankcase UNLESS one or more float needles are not seating properly. Even manual petcocks will eventually leak. Pull the carbs, do a thorough cleaning (not just spraying them with carb cleaner; but don't dip the carb bodies unless you plan on replacing the throttle shaft seals), and replace all of the "soft" wear items. The petcock can be rebuilt, and rebuild kits are available, just be sure to polish the interior of the petcock so the new gaskets can seat properly. A nearly 30 year old bike NEEDS to have all of the undone maintainance caught up on, or you'll spend all of your time chasing down issues instead of riding. Invest in a shop manual, and plan on spending the winter checking everything over. Onc that's done you'll have a Like-New bike for less than the cost of a 10 year-old used bike.

k-moe screwed with this post 09-20-2013 at 08:42 PM
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Old 09-21-2013, 07:11 AM   #14
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A nearly 30 year old bike NEEDS to have all of the undone maintainance caught up on, or you'll spend all of your time chasing down issues instead of riding.
Yep.
there's no free lunch with any bike, especially a Jap 4.

Suck it up, cupcake. This is the trade off for not spending a lot of money- elbow grease.

Eventually, those carbs have to come off and get cleaned or totally gone through with a soaking or time in a sonic cleaner. This is just how it is with carburetors. The longer you wait, the more chance you have of running a cylinder lean or innundating the crankcase with fuel again.

Then you need to make sure the valve clearances are ok because it's probably never been checked. The clutch is probably old too, and you'll need to see to that within probably 10k miles.

In the meantime, there's chain maintenance and tires to pay for if you ride it much.

This is how it is with old Jap bikes. The Radian is a great bike, but they all have to be maintained.

If you can't afford to pay someone to do it, you're going to have to roll up your sleeves and get to work on it.

If I were you, I'd buy a rack of carbs off eBay for 1 - 50 dollars and tinker around with them, get them rebuilt, then spend a day swapping them over for the originals. Start it and see what happens. Correct mistakes. repeat.
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Old 09-28-2013, 04:55 AM   #15
brian72 OP
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Yep.


Suck it up, cupcake. This is the trade off for not spending a lot of money- elbow grease.


I hardly think asking a question about carbs and an issue I've not yet experienced makes me a "cupcake" F Y Ya one-up'n F F.

Today's the day. A three state ride with a new petcock, new oil and my half assed carb cleaning. I'm hoping this works, if not it's onto craigslist for this one. No way am I investing alot (of time or money) into this new to me 1988.
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