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Old 09-29-2013, 06:29 PM   #16
dhallilama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudmantra View Post
Cool. What year was your YZ490? I had to fix the wires on my stator to get it to run right at first. The 1982 stator/ CDI type is the same as the IT490, only the IT490 has a lighting coil. So yes it would be a drop in mod. My YZ490 had a lighting coil and lights, when I got it. Did your YZ490 have a stock pipe?
mine was an '82... stock pipe, stock silencer.
got it with aluminum renthal bars, replaced them with steel bars filled with lead shot & silicone caulk (drunken idea to kill the vibration... worked pretty well).

i accumulated a bunch of bikes and the YZ ended up sitting for a couple years. became single & had to sell off a bunch of the bikes, the YZ being one of 'em. it's one that i wish i didn't let go. kept a KX500 instead, that threatened to kill me every time i rode it.
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Old 09-29-2013, 07:31 PM   #17
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Twin Sucker seems unable to see others may want something different than he does.

Sending the top end off to Gorr will result in a nice rideable albeit fast motorcycle. However do not skip suspension set up. As power levels go up it tends to magnify suspension shortcomings. At the least springs to suit weight/use if not mods like the aforementioned cartridge emulators. I have them in my 465 and big improvement. In fact the 43MM forks are from an '82 490.

Enjoy and post up the results.
I have a set of new fork seals. I'll install the new seals and test the forks with some fresh clean fluid. Pretty cool that you can still get improvement parts for them.
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:05 AM   #18
Mr. Carts
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I got a 75watt lighting coil from Ricky Stator.

I have a set of YZ490 forks and a 18in rear wheel buried in my shed. I am not sure what year they are off.

Would the it be worth the efforts to swap them out on my IT465?

Thanks
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:45 AM   #19
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What year is your IT465? If you already have 43MM forks no gain.

The advantage of the forks for me was 43MM vs. 39MM. Much beefier. Had to hunt down the appropriate brake backing plate as the brake anchor boss is in a different location on the 43MM fork. Between the size and damping upgrade the difference in handling was stunning. Took that hinge in the middle feeling away and gave a precision feel to corner turn in. In soft stuff I can plow the front wheel and let off just a touch and the bike hooks up and turns. It always turned well with the throttle but now I have a choice of throttle or handlebars.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:27 AM   #20
Mr. Carts
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I have the front wheel that came with the YZ490 forks.

I was wondering about the rear wheel and brake if they will bolt on or will I need to do some modifying.
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:26 PM   #21
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I believe the rear wheel/brake are the same.
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:10 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by dhallilama View Post
mine was an '82... stock pipe, stock silencer.
got it with aluminum renthal bars, replaced them with steel bars filled with lead shot & silicone caulk (drunken idea to kill the vibration... worked pretty well).

i accumulated a bunch of bikes and the YZ ended up sitting for a couple years. became single & had to sell off a bunch of the bikes, the YZ being one of 'em. it's one that i wish i didn't let go. kept a KX500 instead, that threatened to kill me every time i rode it.
Yes the YZ490 has some vibration. A lot more than my YZ465. But I was told it could be reduced a lot by having the motor balanced. I'll see how the head mod and porting effects it first. Maybe I better not install the aluminum handle bars.
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:17 PM   #23
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Pretty much stock, with a bunch of wear and tear. Much more to do on it.
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:26 PM   #24
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I rode an 82 YZ490 for years as an all around bike...tight trail, open sand, hills, dales, tracks, jumps, occasional paved road speed runs. Owned it from 1984 to 1995...so lots of years riding it.

Most of the responses are correct. My friends nicnamed it "the school bus" because it was long and yellow. Mine had a few modifcations: Works GP modified fork and rear shock and had some head and carb work done. Now for specifics...I don't know/can't remember but it had a sweet ride.

For jumping it was awesome...so long it was very stable in the air. It took a little muscle to move it around, but it flew nice and landed better than any bike I ever owned (I credit the reworked suspension). The front brake is a dual leading shoe, works pretty darn well...as much power as a disk but it will fade under heavy use. I couldn't push it that hard for too long.

If you get the engine to run right, it is a beast. It never had the power of the KX or even the CR since they were both water cooled. But I would swear on a bible it would crack a ton on pavement (100 mph). In a full on drag on paved road every 250 and big bore would get the jump on me (stupid 4 speed), but by the time I was in 3rd I could match or exceed every other bikes top speed, then you shift into 4th and it was like the millenium falcon. Everyone who tried it said the same thing...it is brutally fast and never ever quit gaining speed.

Unless you ride a ton (which I did for years), it will beat you to death on tight trails. The long chassis makes it more work in the tight stuff, and the power just wears you out. Three hours is all I could do at speed on it before I had to dial back just to survive. It really took a toll on your arms.

If all you are going to do is trail ride it, gear it down so you can use a lot of 3rd. When we road, I used second almost exclusively. Second could bring you off the line quickly, yet had a lot of legs to it. First is nothing but wheelspin, so used only for puting around at slow speeds.

I ran a Terra Flex 6.00 on it, then when is became too expensive, I would find the biggest knobby I could (5.60) and just be ready to change them a lot.

I really miss mine. I think it was the best pure dirtbike i have ever owned. Granted, I owned it way too long and thus it has held a place of favor for me.

Oh yeah...forgot...have fun starting it! Though mine ran clean, no pinging and could run the same plug for a season...5 kicks warm...a dozen or so cold. They better be strong kicks or you will pay for it. I learned early to stop on top of hills or mounds...the less kicking the better.

Kenny
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:28 PM   #25
mudgepondexpress
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look like the standard Answer Products replacment silencer. Be careful, they fold like a cheap knife if you loop it out. Really the only game in town though.

Yeah...I replaced a few.
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:42 PM   #26
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Thanks Kenny. Lots of good info. I was told by the previous owner of this bike , that it would hit over 100 mph also. He said he passed an XR650 with a speedo that was reading 95mph, and he thought he was doing about 10mph faster than the XR. So yes, I'll be gearing it down. I've got the starting routine down pretty good. Once I get fuel down to the motor, it's 2 to 4 kicks, cold. And yes good full solid kicks, right from TDC or your wasting your time. Hot, it might start on the first kick if I get it right. And I can push start the beast, if I forget my MX boots. So far I've been told, that getting the head and ports done right well make it even easier to start. And that's worth a lot. Plus I have a 16 oz Stealthy flywheel weight I want to try. Along with smoothing out the midrange hit, the extra inertia might even help the motor start.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:10 AM   #27
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The flywheels on the 465/490 are big heavy muthas. Get the port/headwork done before you try the flywheel weight.
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Old 10-03-2013, 10:44 AM   #28
JR Greenhorn
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There's no reason to add flywheel weight to an open classer. Instead of "smoothing out" an open classer to ride woods and trails, I'd recommend changing your riding style.

An open class 2-stroke will out-torque almost any 4-stroke on the low end, especially when you get down to the stall threshold. A big 2-stroke will pull down to like 7 rpm before stalling. There's no need to try to stay on the pipe when the going gets tight; just shift up a gear and "torque surf." The big engine inertia and torque these bikes have contribute to one of their greatest strengths: versatility.


The chassis on your '82 favors stability in a big way. That'll make you work harder on the tightest trails, but it will reward you elsewhere, especially for more relaxed (like 7/10s pace) all-day trailriding.


One thing that's key on a big-bore 2-stroke is dialing in the idle. If you have the idle stop screw set too high, a big-bore won't "shut down" the instant you close the throttle. Sometimes you get one or two unwelcome power pulses when coming into a corner. Take the time to set the idle air screw properly, and then dial the idle stop screw down to as low of idle speed as possible. You don't want a bike that will sit and idle on the stand all day. You want just enough idle time to put a glove on between throttle blips, and that's it.

Does your '82 have the YEIS? That may help too.



A close friend of mine has had an '83 YZ490 for the last dozen years or more. I've had plenty of seat time on it myself over the years on all kinds of woods trails (tight & gnarly, wide open & fast, sandy, whooped out, etc.), and also in sand, mud, snow, and on the ice. I myself have had a '94 KTM 440 EXC for the last half dozen or so years. We also have an '89 KDX200 as a spare bike. Both of us are used to riding open classers, and the KDX isn't any easier or faster for us on any terrain. If you fight an open classer it will beat you up, but it also will let you be lazy in a way you can't do on smaller bikes.

I came up on '70s dirt bikes, DT's and such, a '79 YZ125, etc. The bikes from that era encouraged what used to be called a "European" riding style: feet up, smooth cornering, etc. (vs. the MX style of foot down, squared off corners, etc.). The "European" riding style is much better suited to big bore 2-strokes. Modern dirt bikes are all built for the MX riding style (even non-MX bikes).
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Old 10-03-2013, 02:31 PM   #29
dhallilama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR Greenhorn View Post
...
I came up on '70s dirt bikes, DT's and such, a '79 YZ125, etc. The bikes from that era encouraged what used to be called a "European" riding style: feet up, smooth cornering, etc. (vs. the MX style of foot down, squared off corners, etc.). The "European" riding style is much better suited to big bore 2-strokes. Modern dirt bikes are all built for the MX riding style (even non-MX bikes).
i haven't seen it put that way in quite a while; the "European" riding style. such a great way of explaining the general difference between the old and new era of bikes.
moderns sure are quick and easily flick-able, but i just don't enjoy them the same as the bikes i grew up with.


i remember my old YZ490, climing a hill just above idle with no clutch work... the same hill that i had to feather the clutch and work the throttle on my XR600... or hit wide open and try not to die on my at the time brand new CR-F.
kinda wish i didn't read this and the other 490 thread that's active here right now... i have enough bikes, but have found myself searching craigslist for a 490 to replace the one i sold years ago.
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Old 10-04-2013, 06:25 AM   #30
mudmantra OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR Greenhorn View Post
There's no reason to add flywheel weight to an open classer. Instead of "smoothing out" an open classer to ride woods and trails, I'd recommend changing your riding style.

An open class 2-stroke will out-torque almost any 4-stroke on the low end, especially when you get down to the stall threshold. A big 2-stroke will pull down to like 7 rpm before stalling. There's no need to try to stay on the pipe when the going gets tight; just shift up a gear and "torque surf." The big engine inertia and torque these bikes have contribute to one of their greatest strengths: versatility.


The chassis on your '82 favors stability in a big way. That'll make you work harder on the tightest trails, but it will reward you elsewhere, especially for more relaxed (like 7/10s pace) all-day trailriding.


One thing that's key on a big-bore 2-stroke is dialing in the idle. If you have the idle stop screw set too high, a big-bore won't "shut down" the instant you close the throttle. Sometimes you get one or two unwelcome power pulses when coming into a corner. Take the time to set the idle air screw properly, and then dial the idle stop screw down to as low of idle speed as possible. You don't want a bike that will sit and idle on the stand all day. You want just enough idle time to put a glove on between throttle blips, and that's it.

Does your '82 have the YEIS? That may help too.
Thanks. I haven't had the YZ490 in the woods yet. But I have rode the YZ465 in the woods. The 490 feels like it has more low end torque that the 465, and the 465 seem to get on the pipe quicker. So the 490 powerband may be easier to ride in the woods. Even so, I have noticed this with the YZ465, It has a lot of torque even before it gets on the pipe. Even there, it has enough torque to pull the front end off the ground. I've almost flipped it going up hills, in the below the powerband range. Both bikes well idle down pretty low, But I think it could be smoother. I'm hoping the head and port work well help. I've been told that a Honda CR500 carburetor works better than the VM38, on the YZ490. I have PJ38 from a 89CR500, I'll try it once I get everything else sorted out.
I don't have the YEIS on the 490. The 490 intake was cracked and I'm using a YZ465 intake. I could only find new aftermarket 82YZ490 intakes, and I don't know how well they fit/work.
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