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Old 04-10-2013, 11:37 AM   #1
KingKong_500 OP
big size ding dong
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
Oddometer: 40
East-West Across the Ghats, South India

Hi,

Been lurking on this site for many years now, even before I registered. I have been vastly influenced to ride by this website. So here I offer you a ride report as a sacrifice. (oh god this is not going well).



The People

Me - I am Varun and I work as a freelance cameraman/editor for television documentaries and news, currently based in Chennai - south of India. Although I work in Tamilnadu in the East coast, I am from Kerala, on the West coast. I am gonna hit 30 soon and have had my share of adventures on the bike. Just that I am lazy to write about it.

Jacopo and Sheerja - My co riders, husband and wife, are also based in Chennai. Where as J is in between jobs right now, S is an architect. J also happens to be my Kayak guru. That is one point that binds us all, we are all kayakers at some degree of expertise. J being the most experienced.



Here is Jacopo and Sheerja enjoying a day of flatwater kayaking near Chennai.



and here is me.



The Bikes

Both me and Jacopo are fans of Royal Enfields. Chennai also happens to be the home of the Royal Enfield since 1956. I own a 2010 year 500cc model where as Jacopo has two - a 350cc and a 500cc. Both are at least a decade old. The main difference being mine is an aluminium engine with more efficiency whereas his is the good old Iron cast engine with a fun to ride feel. For this trip, J, would be using the 500 which is just running in after an engine re-build. So his speeds are restricted to 50 kmph.



Here is my bike three years ago, clean and shiny.



The Route

Planning did'nt help. It never does. We initially planned to head north but then soon dropped that idea. The previous night to our weekend ride we decided to travel to the Eastern ghats. The plan was to scout rivers where we could possibly do a run during the rainy season. The plan was to get out Saturday morning, the Easter weekend and ride for four days and three nights. Route and rest stops would be decided along the way. My kind of travelling.

As far as I was concerned, I was just looking forward to getting out of the city. Coincidentally, my best buddy who is in the army was coming to town on the west coast of Kerala, so I decided to continue my journey west to meet him.

So our route was to be roughly,

Chennai > Jamunamanthur > Yercaud > Pondicherry > Chennai

I would ride with J&S till Yercaud and then travel south and west to Kerala over the Western Ghats, where as they returned to Chennai.

Chennai > Jamunamanthur > Yercaud > Munnar > Cochin > Guruvayoor.

Guruvayoor was my hometown, and I intended to park my bike there after the trip. I would see her a month later.

1 hot post coming up !!!
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Old 04-10-2013, 02:12 PM   #2
KingKong_500 OP
big size ding dong
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
Oddometer: 40
Day 1

Day 1: Getting out!


Saturday 30th March. The plan was to leave by 5 to hit our breakfast point by 8. I, was ready on time - waiting on my ride. Where as the couple were delayed. Wife still packing her gear i guessed. Anyway we met on the road, shook hands and headed off with big grins on our faces. Anyone who has been here can easily tell the nightmare of having to ride in day traffic. Leaving early didn’t help as we had to encounter lot of traffic from IT and call centre companies getting home from the night shift. It took us an hour to get out of the City. And what a great feeling it was.



Some pictures.



Here is Kong (that is what I call her), all set to roll at 5 in the morning.




This is an hour outside Chennai. Ahh, haven’t felt so good in a while.



J&S were puttering along at their set speed of 50kmph. I was more comfortable with 80kmph, so I would often zip away and then wait for the couple to catch up. Often taking short deviations to do some photography.





Saw this beautiful temple en route. The Eeswaran Kovil near Kanchipuram.



We were on the Chennai - Bangalore highway and our first change in route came in at Arcot on the banks of the Palar river. I have never seen water on that river. It is sad how many rivers in India are dying due to bad management. Makes a kayaker very sad.

At Arcot, as we were filling in fuel, J found out that his engine oil level was very low. Desperate calls to his mechanic were made and fresh oil procured. He did not want to take any risk with his bike, so we patiently topped out the bike with fresh oil. Only to realize later that it was a little too much. All this meant we were late for breakfast. It was 9.30 already, waaaay past my breakfast time. We hit J's favourite breakfast point on the route. Soon the waiters rolled out the standard fare of Dosa's, Idli's and Pongal's.





Here is a pic of J&S happy with a serving of hot Dosa's and Pongal. It might look messy, but it taste's quite nice.



From Arcot, we travelled West by South West in to the Eastern Ghats. From here, till the end of the journey, it would all be rural roads. I have a personal grudge against Highways (or freeways). I don't feel comfortable in them. I feel bored and the riding leaves me exhausted. On these rural/country roads, it is a different matter. Speed's are low, there are a lot of twists, turns and bumps on the road. The scenery is fantastic and your mind begins to fly.






As soon as we turned off the highway, the views became more interesting. Here a women dries her crop of rice. And on the right, a very brightly painted tourist bus has the portrait of Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, former President of India on its back.



We had to take many tiny village roads to get on to the main route to our night stop at Jamunamanthur which sits on the Javadi hill range in the Eastern Ghats. I have not travelled much on the eastern ghats, but I was liking what I saw. On the foothills were lush green fields of paddy, coconut and banana plantations.







It was slow going as the roads were hardly 12-14 feet wide. Traffic was occasional - a motorcycle or a tractor would go by with its occupants curiously looking upon us travellers. We were in no hurry and I would often stop to sip water or take a few photographs. I ran into trouble once when I hit a bad patch of the road and the speedometer cable came off. I stopped to fix it which also gave the couple some time to build a gap between us.

We soon reached a forest check post where we were asked to alight and purchase tickets for a nearby zoo. We were not interested in going to the zoo and just wanted to carry on our journey on this 'public road which happened to go through a forest'. I do not want to start writing about the Forest Department, they are trouble. Anyway the head guard let us go asking us to return before sunset as it was elephant country. Much of the Eastern Ghat range is protected although very poorly and its more degraded than preserved. We nodded in agreement, even though we had no plans to return - our journey was to get to the top and stay there in a little town. As soon as we left, Sheerja changed her mind and wanted to visit the zoo. A few seconds of angry stare later we decided to have tea outside the zoo, and that’s as far as we go near the zoo. As we were having tea, we saw a group of monkey's stealing stuff from bike's parked near the zoo. With amazing dexterity the monkey would open the velcro seal and the zipper of tank bags to look for food or any other item of interest. We watched in amazement on this show of skill. We continued on our journey and started to climb.






A settlement inside the forests. Although life might seem peaceful, existence is a daily struggle for the people who live here.



Soon we were at the first scouting location. The Amirthi river might be dry now, but Jacopo says in full flow it would be a very exciting river run. A good class 2+/3 run. We spent some time imagining ourselves doing slides and boofs on the river. We carried on slowly along the river, reading the river as it twists along plantations of forest dwellers. We stopped at a house to ask for information on when the best time would be to run the river. The man of the house gave us information on rainfall months and amount of flow. He was excited to hear we would come one day to paddle the river.





Jacopo scan's the river bed.




Asking the locals for information on the Amirthi river.


Once we left the house, it was an hour of ghat climbing session. I was having fun throwing the bike into the corners. There were 8-10 hair pin bends and my ears were popping at the speed at which we were climbing. At one corner I applied my rear brakes as I was leaning in, and due to the bad design of the brake pedal, it scrapped the floor and the bike almost threw me off. Had a scare. The couple were having a great time too except that their bike was burning away all the excess engine oil we had put earlier in the morning. We rode till we almost reached the top, then stopped for some pictures.




Jacopo's CI Enfield 500.




Styling it on his bike.




My EFI Enfield 500. Which do you think looks better. Mine or Jacopo's ?




Almost at the top, we had a photo op.




You can see how the climb was from the plains below. Twisty, I say.




The picture on the right is my favourite from the entire journey. It looks like a perfect trip photo.




Finally when we reached the top, the terrain looked dry. This brightly painted church stands in contrast to the surroundings.



We were at the top (at least for today), at a small village called Jamunamanatur. Nothing major about this place except for a small lake and a waterfall, both of which are dry. We searched for a place to sleep for the night and ended up at a co-operative run tourist house. One look and you would walk away, but we were not looking for luxury. The manager was away and the entire place was locked up, so we went to have lunch. It was 3.30 and waaaaaay past my lunch time.




Lunch was a traditional meal served on plantain leaf.



Lunch was traditional Tamil fare consisting of rice with lentil curry, beetroot side dish, curd and crispy pappad's. The owner of the shack surprised us with some freshly cut pappaya's on the house. The total came in for less than 140 Rupees (about 3 dollars). I relished the food so much that I over ate. Now must lie down.

And as it went, we finally traced the manager of the guesthouse who brought us the keys to our place. It was very run down; the beds had no linen on them; the floor had not been cleaned for ages and dust was everywhere. I opted for a Non AC room (Rs 450/$9) and the couple for an AC room (Rs 700/$14). They figured an AC room would be cleaner. The manager tried his best and got us some pillows and fresh bed linen but hardly enough to cover the entire bed. I gave mine to the couple as I had a sleeping bag. We agreed that sleep was top priority and that we would meet at 5.30 to have tea and go star gazing at the nearby observatory.





My room at the guesthouse.



We met at 6 in the evening and went to town for some tea. We had called the nearby observatory to ask them about coming over. They warned us that if the sky was cloudy, they would not be to blame. We had to travel around 10 kms out, through the forests to get to the observatory. Since it was elephant country we made quick reaction plans.

The Vainu Bappu Observatory, is home to the largest telescope in Asia.You can read all about it on the wiki page, and the discoveries they have made at the place. Now we were in for two big disappointments. One, even though it was a Saturday - there was a huge load of noisy annoying school kids on a field trip. This meant waiting for a long time for a chance to look through the telescope. Secondly, no one was allowed into the main telescope tower and we had to do with a six inch field telescope. Sheerja made a comment about the six inch something and we had a nice laugh.

She has been here before to do her thesis and was very excited at looking through the telescope. For me, this would be a first time and listening to Sheerja I started to get very excited. As we waited for the school kids to leave I saw three shooting stars. The night sky was clear and in the pitch darkness one could see millions of stars with the naked eye. Finally after almost an hour of waiting everyone had left, except us and a family from the plains nearby. They had two daughters, aged 12 and 8, and the elder one named Kalpana wanted to be an astronaut.

The four from the family along with Sheerja were making all kinds of wonderful comments as they looked through the telescope. "Wow, the colour...the texture OMG I can see the rings of Jupiter...OH Look the moon of Jupiter...". Jacopo was more timid in his response. He saw and sighed. Now it was my turn to look at this giant mass called Jupiter. I put my eyes against the glass and.......I saw nothing. I twisted and turned every knob on that little telescope but I saw nothing. Angered by my actions the in charge of the centre blasted me for blaming the telescope. He said something was wrong with my eyes - I panicked. I thought I had good eyesight, yet here are people seeing things I clearly could not. I could not see the planet except for a little dot. I could not make out its colour nor its moon or the ring around it. More stars, planets and clusters followed and all I saw were little dots of light - nothing more that what I saw with the naked eye.

The in-charge, now calmer, explained that different people have varying sensitivity for light and that I should try eating fish, carrots and cycling to improve my eyesight. At least Sheerja had a good time. I gave the little girls a candy each and wished them well.

We left the observatory wiser (maybe) and rode back into town. I encouraged Jacopo to do some lightless night riding. Guided only by the stars and their reflected light, we rode through the forests slowly sans any traffic. It was a great experience. By the time we got back to Jamunamanathur, it was already 9 and the entire town was shut down. We were hungry and the only thing that was open was a bakery. We bought an assortment of snacks and headed back to our guesthouse. Over conversations about the universe and what life actually means, we ate our dinner consisting of fried peanuts, biscuits and buns.





No kidding. This is how we saw Jupiter, atleast how we thought we saw Jupiter.




Dinner was an assortment of snacks.



It was a good first day of riding. More coming soon in the next post. Stay tuned.



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East-West Across the Ghats, South India

KingKong_500 screwed with this post 04-10-2013 at 02:17 PM Reason: Baah...some pics had to aligned. What do you care.
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Old 04-10-2013, 02:33 PM   #3
BenYork
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Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Tahoe/ Humboldt
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Cool pictures, looking forward to more!

Do you do much boating over there? I am from California, boat a bunch here. I went to the western ghats once in the dry season, and saw tons of potential there. Do you guys do a bunch of creeking out there? I know there is good kayaking in northern India, but I always wondered about the south.
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:23 AM   #4
KingKong_500 OP
big size ding dong
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
Oddometer: 40
BenYork: Sorry forgot about this post. Yes we do a bit of WW kayaking here. Monsoon is the peak time. We have bases in Kerala, Karnataka and around Goa. In the dry time we head to the sea to surf kayak. We (a bunch of friends) conducted the South's first white water river festival recently. You can see more info and pics of the Malabar River Festival here: http://www.malabarfestival.in/

I BTW won the beginners Slalom :)

You should come in 2014. Its quite a gathering.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:14 AM   #5
KingKong_500 OP
big size ding dong
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
Oddometer: 40
Continuing the story

I blame my internet connection. I was back home and high speed internet bandwidth was a luxury I did not have. Now that I am in one of the big cities, I can continue to post pictures.

I actually forgot how to post pictures. So lets try some,


Day 2: The Off road




An anthill becomes a site of worship. Long winding roads through the forest. And the observatory as seen from the road


The ride to the breakfast point was down smooth roads through the reserve forest. We did not encounter much traffic. The more we descended on to the other side, the more the forests gave way to farming. I lost track of the couple and I waited on the side of the road. Five minutes later I turned around and went back looking for them. About three kilometers behind and I see them coming towards me. I signalled them to continue ahead. We were heading towards the small town of Alangayam. This was to be our breakfast place.

Its a small town that hardly sees any outsiders, so three motorcyclists must have been quite a sight for the locals. J had been here before and knew of a special little place hidden among the many lanes where we could get some authentic breakfast. It did not have any signage indicating there was a restaurant (we call these hotels) here.





The little breakfast point. Hard to spot from the road. The owners busy serving customers.




The place was busy with the usual morning rush. Hot idlis (steamed rice cakes) and puris (fast fried wheat rotis - I am lost)
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KingKong_500 screwed with this post 12-30-2013 at 08:16 AM Reason: spell check :)
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:30 AM   #6
KingKong_500 OP
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Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
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Day 2 Contd:



Ok. Now that post works and the photos are showing properly.

So, as I was saying. Getting authentic Tamil food is getting harder these days especially in the cities. Most of the restaurants in their need to make more profit end up cuting down on ingredients and portions. This place was an exception. The food was great and filling. I had the usual Idli's, Poori's and Pongal (One of everything I say). Coffee was average but better than the last place. During breakfast I asked the couple what the delay was earlier on the road. It seems they had seen this man who lives inside a shipping container. S, an architect was immediately curious. He had all the works inside the little container. How he got it there and why is a mystery. I don't have a picture of it unfortunately.






J finishing up on the breakfast. Coffee was average, but hey.


The whole breakfast came to around Rs 150 which is quite inexpensive. We made our way out of the narrow lanes and on to the main road, on our way to the nights pit stop: Yercaud. The couple on the newly rebuilt Enfield wanted to take it slow and not stress the engine. For me, in my riding gear and my air cooled engine, had to be at a certain speed to keep my head and engine from melting. So I offered to ride ahead and wait every now and then. Traffic was more prominent on this main road. The road did not have shade all the time, so I would ride till I found shade and rest there for the couple to catch up. The scenery though kept changing every now and then.




A colorful Mariamman Temple (dedicated to a goddess). Shade under a big Banyan tree.





Juicy palmyra palm fruit being sold under a tree shade. A flower seller.






Sunflower field. Kong set against the field.





Cattle feed involves a soup of left over food. The couple catches up.



The road so far was very good and smooth. We would pass a dusty village every thirty minutes or so. After three hours or so on the bike, I stopped at a small village where the couple caught up. J had been opening up the bike every now and then, or probably he did not like me in the lead all the time and was trying to catch up. :)

We had a few locally made refreshments and also some coconut water - El Neer. We rested for a while and asked around to fix on our directions. We were to ride on this highway for another 10 kilometers or so and then take a deviation through narrow village roads and then starts a long off road section. There is another main route to Yercaud, but we wanted to do this one.





The bridge was out. The couple at the start of the offroad bit.





It was reserve forest again.



Enfield's are not generally made for off road use. But they are generally built tough so getting them to hit a few berms does'nt hurt. I like to go off road - I had some years in mountain biking - but nothing fancy.

We exchanged bikes for a change. My new design engine revs easy and has good soft suspension all around, including the seats. It sits low. J's enfield rev's quite slow, so it was a challenge to be riding hard stuff without stalling. We rode quite a bit through the forest and hardly saw a soul. Patches of agriculture came up now and then, and so were also visible the tops of huts through the trees. We found a nice pool and decided to take a splash - It was quite hot, so that helped. It was quite and peaceful. Why S decided to start a conversation on Candiru's, I don't know. But that very instant I got out of the water.





J riding my bike hard. Preparing for some soaking. And the pool.



After we got going, there was more off road or to say no roads. After about 10 kilometers, we hit the bottom of the Yelagiri range. Although there are no roads here, there were enough signs of construction material to suggest something might come up soon. Sad that.

The path turned deep, dusty and loose. The front wheel would get caught up in the dust and the engine ended up stalling. I had to turn my bike around - go down the hill - kick start - and then try again. It was tiring but looking back now, worth every moment.






Me, climbing a steep bit (not obvious in the pic). J and S on my bike kicking up some dirt.



Soon the dusty path made way to broken pavement and we started some serious climbing. The air cooled which helped the bikes quite a lot. J had been going full throttle on my bike. I guess being on his bike was like being a Buddhist.





J and S on the 'Hair pin' bends close to Yercaud.


As we climbed, the roads improved and the flora changed as well. There was quite a lot of plantation happening at this height. Every thing from cardamom to coffee and even oranges. We soon reached Yercaud town by about 4 PM. We were exhausted.
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East-West Across the Ghats, South India

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Old 12-30-2013, 10:05 AM   #7
KingKong_500 OP
big size ding dong
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
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Day 2 Contd: The horror's of Indian hill stations


Let me tell you something about Indian hill stations. Almost all of them were made popular at about the 19th century during British rule. They have since gained in popularity among all economic quarters of Indian tourists. Most of the infrastructure at these hill stations however still date back to pre Independence. Imagine a serene setting - now imagine concrete buildings - littering and garbage - vehicle pollution and traffic - overpriced everything - and you shall get a typical Indian hill station. Yercaud was no different.

We had'nt had anything to eat for most part of the day, so we went looking for a decent bite. Our initial plan was to stay in Yercaud and split in different directions the next day. J and S would continue towards Chennai where as I was to ride down the Eastern Ghats and head towards the Western Ghats.

It was a sunday night and every hotel was full.

We went to the government run hotel in town. They had rooms and were mostly out of my budget. J and S kindly offered to share their room with me to keep costs down. This did not go down well with the manager of the hotel. He refused to let me stay and wouldn’t offer me any of the cheaper beds as well. As per his policy a man can share a room with two women, but two men couldn't share a room with one woman.

It was about 7 PM by then and I had nothing in me to argue. I had to make a decision quick. I was in no mood to ride as I had woken quite early and ridden through tough roads. Against everything shouting in my head, my heart told me to just get on the bike and go on. J & S were quite saddened by the turn of events. They wished me well. We bid our goodbye's.

After giving the hotel manager another nasty stare, I got on my bike at about half past 7 and rode hard down the ghat roads towards the industrial town of Salem. I do such stupid stuff every now and then which after a couple of years I would regret. Anyway there was nothing I could do. I wanted to cover maximum distance before I stopped for the night.

I crossed Salem and got on the main national highway - eight lanes - and rode full throttle towards the border with Kerala. I missed my initial turn off the highway and had to take another one. During dinner people warned me not to go too close to the border at night as it was 'infested' with wild elephants. When I did get off the main highway, I ended up being the only vehicle on the road. It was a full moon night, so I would switch off my lights and putter along for a change. The cool breeze and moonlight with nobody on the road - it was sheer bliss.

By about 10 PM I had travelled around 200 kms from Yercaud. By now my body was hurting badly. I was in the middle of nowhere and no hotels in sight. So I rode to the nearest village on the road and decided to sleep on the porch of one of the shops. A street dog decided to keep me company. I fed him some biscuits.




My room was the porch of a village departmental store. Meet itchy the street dog.


It was quite windy and any small noise would wake me up startled fearing elephants. After a while the pain overcame fear and I went into deep sleep.
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Old 12-30-2013, 10:50 AM   #8
KingKong_500 OP
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Joined: Sep 2011
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Oddometer: 40
Day 3: A new day. A new beginning.

The previous nights episode was history. I woke up quite early again, at about 5 and quickly made my way towards the border with Kerala. I was probably the first to reach the forest check post near the border. Here the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and Tiger reserve began. The road exists because its a major gateway to transport tea from Kerala to the ports of the east.




Glorious morning. The western ghats emerges in the distance.


The road through the park is quite narrow and not so well maintained. Birds were very active and one could hear calls all around. Peacock's far and near welcomed the morning. At about every now and then a big board would announce that you are very close to an elephant corridor. At one of the boards, I saw this big guy lazily grazing on the tree leaves.




Fresh dung. And making an appearance.




The forest road and the towering western ghats.


Other than the tusker, I saw a couple of wild boars, a bison and some monkeys. I was happy. But that soon turned sour. As I got closer to Kerala, I started to notice the vast amount of litter on the road. Especially plastic bottles. I started to collect them one by one - and tied them to the back of my bike.




At the Kerala - Tamilnadu border inside the sanctuary. Collecting litter inside the forest.


As soon as I entered Kerala, I went to the forest department office and informed the senior authority of the plastic menace. He thanked me for my thoughtfulness but explained his inability to stop the local traders at the border from stocking plastic. He said he would act to improve the cleaning operations to twice a week from the present one.

On the way, I noticed the Pambar river. Although it was running quite dry it had potential for white water kayaking.

(It turned out that the same senior forest officer would invite me and my friends to kayak the rapids to test possibilities of rafting operations. My friends from USA, Nepal and Italy did most of the Pambar river, whereas I kayaked a smaller bit).




The Pambar running dry. Sandalwood protected behind a fence.


The road from the border to the hill town of Munnar was AWESOME. To the average tourist, Munnar is a tea paradise where the British planted some of the earliest tea plants on earth. To me it was a smooth twisty dream. All I remember is throwing my weight around from one corner to another and tea everywhere :) Here are some pictures.





Munnar is green everywhere with the odd purple.






Endless tea estates.


I soon headed on a secret deviation that not many people know about. Its a secret trail through thick forests. I will not write much about it except that there is hardly a path and you can smell elephants everywhere. That's how wild it is in there. Here are some photos.





Tea soon gave away to old growth forest.





Through some wild trails. I will admit that I was not looking forward to elephants.




Deep inside the forest.





Kong was performing well, which helped me stay calm.





At the end of the trail. One battered smiling man.


When I had ridden for about 5 hours through the trail, I began to come back into human settlements. I was pleased and thanked my bike for pulling me through the entire journey without a hitch. From here civilization grew more intense. The more I descended into the plains, the better the roads got and the more the traffic worsened. Soon by evening I was riding through very congested roads close to my home. My heart and mind wanted to head back towards the ghats.


In three days of riding, I got to experience the highs and lows of being on the road. Thankfully I had great company for two days, and then the third day's loneliness let my mind wander and take in the nature. I got to understand my bike better and have ever more respect for it now.


At the end of the day, I always ask myself - Will I do it again ?

You never know. :)






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East-West Across the Ghats, South India

KingKong_500 screwed with this post 12-30-2013 at 11:02 AM Reason: spell check :)
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:49 AM   #9
L.B.S.
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Joined: Feb 2010
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Thank you so much for this ride report! It was awesome!

Great pictures, great narration (Candiru's, lol Auuugh!)

Jupiter:



Superb
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Old 01-01-2014, 12:56 AM   #10
KingKong_500 OP
big size ding dong
 
Joined: Sep 2011
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Oddometer: 40
Thank you for your kind words L.B.S :)

I hope to write some more ride reports I have had on my enfield here in India.
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Old 01-01-2014, 01:41 AM   #11
L.B.S.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KingKong_500 View Post
Thank you for your kind words L.B.S :)

I hope to write some more ride reports I have had on my enfield here in India.
I look forward to them all
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:13 AM   #12
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Great Ride

Looks like quite the adventure. Amazing pictures in the forest. I worry about squirrels and you have to worry about elephants.
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Old 01-01-2014, 04:34 PM   #13
tedmarshall
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Groovy

Thanks for sharing.
A true adventure. Nice to see you using the bikes off-road.
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Old 01-02-2014, 05:06 PM   #14
Ridin Dirty
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Joined: Apr 2008
Location: WMASS
Oddometer: 178
Great pictures and great ride. Thanks for sharing! I've ridden without a light before...but never in elephant country!
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Old 01-07-2014, 09:08 AM   #15
KingKong_500 OP
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Joined: Sep 2011
Location: India
Oddometer: 40
Eek Thank you for the replies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Groovemaster View Post
Looks like quite the adventure. Amazing pictures in the forest. I worry about squirrels and you have to worry about elephants.
I would prefer elephants to squirrels as well :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by tedmarshall View Post
Thanks for sharing.
A true adventure. Nice to see you using the bikes off-road.
Ted
Thank you ted. The new engine enfields are built quite tough, although mine is bare stock there are many who modify it to take it to the next level of off road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridin Dirty View Post
Great pictures and great ride. Thanks for sharing! I've ridden without a light before...but never in elephant country!
:) Hey if you can't see the elephant, it can't see you either, right ???
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