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Old 03-30-2014, 12:39 PM   #151
RoloMoto
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In Chilecito you have to visit La Mexicana mine. This mine is at 4.600 meters, with a cableway (cablecarril, i don't know how to speel it) contructed in 1904 with mules. All the towers and engines where packed in Germany in special boxes with the weight that a mule could carry.
Then head to Fiambala.


http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mina_La_Mejicana
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:41 PM   #152
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:11 PM   #153
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In Fiambala you have to go to a thermal bath and here are some hughe dunes, the Dakar never miss this place. From Fiambala head towards Palo Blanco, in the way is Medanitos, here you can enter the Dunes. Well, here is the tricky part, you have to go a place called Las Papas, that is an indian village, i dont remember exactly but when you pass Palo Blanco, 12 kms ahead there is a little village, you pass though and there is an intersection, you hace to go right and from there 5,4 kms ahead there is a road on your left, you have to take it (shown carefull in the map). When you arrive to Las Papas buy something (a coke, beer, crakers) and ask the chief for the thermal waters, there is a sign though. You have to walk 700 mts. but don't miss this, is like being in Mars !!
The road will leave you into the Campo de Piedra Pomez (Pumice Field). The road ends in asphalt, take to your left and head to Antofagasta de la Sierra.
This route is not very dificult but there is nobody over there, so drive carefully, take gas and water, and never leave the main road or you will get lost.
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:24 PM   #154
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In Antofagasta there is a place called Volcan Galan, that is the greater volcanic bolier (caldera volcanica) in the world. If you want to go, you better ask a guide to drive you there, its very extreme for the CG.

Well, know you have to go down to Hualfin.
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:30 PM   #155
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Thanks, thought it was easier !!. I like doing this, it brings me old memories, found some new roads to explore and at least someone likes it !!
I let you know when i post some photos.
Regards


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Old 03-30-2014, 01:41 PM   #156
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Near Hualfin its located the mayor opencast mine : La Alumbrera (check it out in google as there is no way you can enter )

Head to Calafate and stop at the Ruinas Quilmes. Here used to live an indian tribe called Quilmes. At some moment in history they where relocated in Buenos Aires, thats why there is a place called Quilmes down here. They where brought here walking, so hundreds died in the way.

Calafate is one of the most popular wine maker region in the world. Please taste them... all !!!
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:01 PM   #157
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ok. We have reach a point that you have to decide if you want to go to Salta and Jujuy, or leave them behind. If you ask me, leave them behind.

Well, hope you are better after a few bottles of wine. Now you are going to enter, as i consider, one of the three most wonderfull places that the ruta 40 has to offer you : Los Valles Calchaquies (The Calchaquies Valley) They go from Cafayate up to La Poma. Dont leave any village without visiting. If you decide not to visit salta you will have to climb up to 5.000 mts, through El Abra del Akay, to reach San Antonio de los Cobres. Again, in La Poma you have to do three things : gas, water and tell Gendarmeria (not the police) that you are going to San Antonio de los Cobres. Please remember and dont forget to tell Gendarmeria in San Antonio taht you arrived. Tell you this because everyone warns when they go but dont bother to notify they arrived well. Then we sufer this because Gendarmeria will not go to look for you until its to late.
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:11 PM   #158
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From San Antonio head north towards RN 52 through RN 40, its all gravel (spall ?) until the RN 52, there take left to Paso de Jama, and on your left will be el salar Salinas Grandes, you can enter it at some point ( remember to eash the bikes in the hotel ) . Then take the RN52 again and head east to Pumamarca, you will pass La Cuesta de Lipan at 4.170 mts, visit Pumamarca and head towards Tilcara.
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:22 PM   #159
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In Tilcara there is some indian fortress or something. From here you are at only 200 km to leave us. In the way visit La Quebrada de Humauca and the Cerro de los Siete Colores (Seven Colors Hill). Then head to La Quiaca.

Hope this will help you. I have a .kmz file of this, give me your mail and i will send it to you as long as the routes so you can put them in your gps. Can i upload them here ?
Also let me know if you want to go to Salta, there is another good road to do.
If you need help with Bolivia and Peru, please let me know.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:15 AM   #160
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Thanks!

Thanks so much for the info! Tom already did that first section near San Juan, into the Andes, and really liked it. He stayed back while I took a bus to Buenos Aires, to see family (and where I've now been sick for the last 2 weeks!). Looking forward to getting back to the bike and heading north.

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In Tilcara there is some indian fortress or something. From here you are at only 200 km to leave us. In the way visit La Quebrada de Humauca and the Cerro de los Siete Colores (Seven Colors Hill). Then head to La Quiaca.

Hope this will help you. I have a .kmz file of this, give me your mail and i will send it to you as long as the routes so you can put them in your gps. Can i upload them here ?
Also let me know if you want to go to Salta, there is another good road to do.
If you need help with Bolivia and Peru, please let me know.
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Old 04-02-2014, 03:14 PM   #161
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Cgl-125!

Very cool idea of bike-hopping across the continents.

I love your choice of bike for LA, but I am partial to the CGL-125 having bought one in Costa Rica.



Will be interested in seeing how yours holds up for you. Looking forward to more...
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Old 04-04-2014, 04:50 PM   #162
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CGL Family

That's my bike, but in silver! Tom's on the Storm, but I'm loving my CGL :)

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Very cool idea of bike-hopping across the continents.

I love your choice of bike for LA, but I am partial to the CGL-125 having bought one in Costa Rica.



Will be interested in seeing how yours holds up for you. Looking forward to more...
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Old 04-04-2014, 05:08 PM   #163
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Thanks!!

Ok, I've mapped out the route you gave all the way up to La Quiaca. We'll do most of it, if not all. I've never been so organized in my route planning :) I am a little worried about the CGL at those altitudes, but it'll be a great trial run! Please do send more info for Bolivia if you have the time. I haven't looked into it at all yet, but know I want to see the salt flats, then head for Lima. I won't have much time to spare in Bolivia as I'm meeting friends in Lima on May 10th.

I was in Machu Picchu a few years ago, so if I don't do that region again, it's no big deal. More importantly, Tom really wants to avoid the crazy Peruvian traffic we've been hearing about! We're considering a coastal route. I haven't seen the Atacama desert, so maybe head through there after Uyuni?

Post here again if you can, so Tom can hop online and check out the maps. Thanks again! Huge help.



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Originally Posted by RoloMoto View Post
In Tilcara there is some indian fortress or something. From here you are at only 200 km to leave us. In the way visit La Quebrada de Humauca and the Cerro de los Siete Colores (Seven Colors Hill). Then head to La Quiaca.

Hope this will help you. I have a .kmz file of this, give me your mail and i will send it to you as long as the routes so you can put them in your gps. Can i upload them here ?
Also let me know if you want to go to Salta, there is another good road to do.
If you need help with Bolivia and Peru, please let me know.
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:27 PM   #164
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Best of luck madam!!

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Old 04-06-2014, 03:00 PM   #165
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Argentina

I was recently working out how to summarize Argentina and its culture, and was forwarded a hilarious article that does more justice to the nuances of this place than I could ever do. Although I was raised by an Argentine mother, some of these come as a surprise and an "aha! So that's why" moment... Such as direction giving in Argentina... And the 4 way stops, which seem like suicidal endeavors even after 6,000km of riding in this country.

Note: "Boludo" is the equivalent to "dumb-ass", or some such insult. It seems to be a real favorite amongst Argentines. At the Buenos Aires zoo a couple weeks ago with my little nephew, a 5-6 year old boy looked at a picture of a tiger and proudly said, "Dad, look! It says "lion!" (He was obviously just learning to read).

Dad's response? "That says 'tiger', boludo!"


Matador Network's "How to piss of an Argentine"

Fart in public.

In the US, kids are taught to say “excuse me.” In Argentina, kids are apparently taught a zero tolerance policy. People fart unabashedly in public restrooms across the US, while bathrooms in Argentina are deathly quiet.

Argentina is a nation where public flatulence is so offensive, so unforgivable, that a dancer named María Amuchástegui who accidentally farted on her popular (and unfortunately, live) aerobics show literally fled the set, ending her career, and not appearing in public for another 30 years. It’s a nation apparently holding it in at all times, accounting perhaps for the preponderance of people walking around with cara de culo, or “ass-face,” particularly in Buenos Aires. Por favor, wait until you’re safely out of anyone’s auditory / olfactory range before tirarte un pedo.

Don’t have change or small bills.

Just try paying for your 12-block taxi ride with a 100-peso bill.

“Microphone” while you’re drinking mate.

Drinking mate has a pace to it. It’s not like sipping coffee. When you really get it, you see how it sets the rhythm of a conversation, or charla. When it’s passed to you, sip purposefully until the mate is completely empty (you need to hear a gurgling sound), and then pass it directly back to the cebador (person serving the mate). Don’t say “gracias” unless you want to communicate to the cebador that you’re finished and don’t want another round.

Argentines take a lot of care in how mate is prepared and served. In any way tampering with the bombilla (straw), stirring the yerba around, playing with it, trying to prepare it yourself and then mess up the temperature of the water, the amount of yerba, etc, or most of all, sitting there talking while you’re holding the mate (microphoning) — all of this gets people ornery.

Be surprised when people microphone while smoking pot.

Contradictorily, Argentines seriously bogart joints and other smokeage. It’s not puff puff pass but puff puff talk puff puff talk. This is frequently how big bottles of Quilmes and other beers are passed around circles of friends as well. Tranqui: There’s no hurry.

Talk shit about their pizza.

Be prepared to feel the wrath if you start comparing your organic veggie-topped, dank microbrew-accompanied, non-greasy pies to Argentines’ beloved “peek-zas.” In general, praise everything culinary, as Argentine asado, vino, and pastries sort of make up for its soggy pizza, dearth of vegetables, (and any solid concept of “breakfast” for that matter).

Misinterpret the kissing thing.

In Argentina you greet people with besos. It’s not about hugs or fistbumps or handshakes. Regardless of gender, people’s friends, family, their friends of friends, even casual acquaintances are greeted and said goodbye to with a quick peck on the right cheek. So don’t start having panic attacks when you’re suddenly stubble to stubble with some dude, or mistake that the girl is actually interested in you. Check yourself: It’s a saludo, nada más.

Refuse to engage in absurdly dangerous handling of fireworks.

Somewhat self-explanatory. Happens on New Year’s Eve and Christmas. Either stay in if you’re not ready to lose an eye/eardrum, or just be ready to duck. Either way, complaining gets you nowhere.

Obey traffic rules / give right of way to a pedestrian.

The roads in Argentina are a shitshow. On every conceivable level, laws, lanes, common sense, and courtesy are thrown out the window, replaced with a kind of machismo hierarchy based around balls and the size/velocity of your vehicle.

Q: Who has right of way at a four-way stop? A(1): Whoever doesn’t stop, and (2) whoever’s momentum and vehicle size would inflict the most damage on others.

There is one universally followed law: No matter what, you do NOT stop for peatones (pedestrians), and if you do, prepare yourself for a chorus of raised fists, ¡boludo!s, and possible rear-endings.

If you’re a guy: Don’t flirt with girls to some degree.

If you’re a guy and you don’t flirt at least a little, then you’re basically written off as un aparato (an “apparatus”).

Leave a party or social event early.

And by “early” we’re talking 2am. In Argentina, the phrase/excuse “I’ve got to get up early for work tomorrow” doesn’t exist.

Refuse hospitality.

In the same spirit, Argentines will want you to eat, drink, party until you reach a comatose state. When you’re literally passing out on someone’s sofa, that’s when you’re done. You can try to claim dietary restrictions or simply say you’re too full for a fifth porción of meat, but you’ll be doing irreparable damage.

Ask if they speak Portuguese.

Buenos Aires is not the capital of Brazil (where, yes, they speak Portuguese), but Argentina, where they speak castellano, aka Spanish.

Doubt their directions.

If you stop and ask for directions, Argentines have two rules: (1) Never say “Sorry, I don’t know,” and (2) Even if you don’t know or aren’t sure, create elaborate, ultra-convincing, and completely false directions as a bluff. With enough language skills, perspicacity, and time spent in Argentina, you can begin to recognize when somebody is actually telling you the truth versus “playing the guitar,” but either way, just smile, nod, and enjoy the show.

Bring up the Nazis.

Juan Perón, Argentina’s at once reviled, revered, and at one point exiled president, seemed to have a hard-on for Nazis. He made Argentina a safe haven for war criminals, helping sneak in Josef Mengele and Adolf Eichmann (among others), where they were protected and able to prosper for decades.

But while this is true, it’s also given rise to unfair, undeserved, hyperbolic associations of Argentina as “full of Nazis” (I’ve personally experienced / witnessed much more anti-Semitism here in the US). Ultimately the most far-reaching fact is that post-WWII, Argentina accepted more Jewish refugees than any other country in Latin America, and is now home to the 6th-largest Jewish population in the world.

Be from the US. . . and be right about something.

I’m not saying it isn’t somewhat deserved (just check your history: Operation Condor), but an obscure antipathy towards Los Yanquis definitely exists in Argentina. Even if you manage to ingratiate yourself with a local crew (and it’s surprisingly easy as long as you’re not an apparatus), there will always be this tiny layer of something like jealousy, suspicion, a sense that you’ve had it easier somehow…. I’m not exactly sure how to describe it. All I know is that if you just go with it, outwardly accepting, that yes, you’re a boludo when it comes to carving meat, building fences, tending horses, hitting on girls, whatever it is, all will be fine. But as a gringo, as soon as you suggest something — like driving slightly faster on a dirt road to smooth out the bumps — and your (likely male) Argentine friend discovers you’re right? Shit, prepare for extended sulking, bitterness, even outright rage.

Don’t give up your place in line for a pregnant woman.

This is a truly beautiful (if inconsistent with the pedestrians thing) part of Argentinean culture: People in lines always give up their place for pregnant women. Are you a healthy 20-something backpacker waiting for the ATM where you’ll leverage ridiculous euro or dollar exchange rates to extract more pesos for your night in San Telmo than the pregnant woman at the back of the line (with four nenes pulling on her) will withdraw in a month? God help you, let her pass in front.

Call yourself an “American.”

While this is true in other Latin American countries, Argentines seem particularly sensitive to the fact that technically all of us throughout the Americas are “American” and that the proper term is estadounidense.

After getting made fun of for your accent, ask about their English.

Imitating gringo accents is just a kind of national pastime in Argentina. You can live there for years, speaking with so much fluency, grace, and jerga that no Latino outside of Argentina would ever guess you weren’t from there…and still, the second you round off the the d’s and r’s of “Puerto Madero,” you’re gonna get made fun of. And you’re expected to just take this in good humor. The second you laugh at their version of “Bob Marley,” “Pink Floyd,” “Rolling Stones,” etc. — the second you ask about their English — preparate.

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