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Old 10-28-2013, 10:32 PM   #46
Homey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
18 times,dang you are a lucky boy to still be with us. Ive flipped an RD350 over backwards twice on the street,high sided on a greasy new back tire once..... many years ago and nothing since. I hate roadrash.

(knock on wood) I know I could go down at any time though.
I don't know. I've always worn full leathers and a back brace (since the early 80's anyway) so I have lots of scuffed up leather and very little roadrash. I've never been one to spend much time (if any) in the triple digget range, I like going fast around slower corners so most of my get offs were under 60mph. The bike rarely even left the road or hit anything. It's when you actually hit something that things change. It's that sudden stop that gets you.
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Old 10-29-2013, 01:06 AM   #47
atomicalex
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Originally Posted by fallingoff View Post
Less hat wearing drivers.
Not sure how many US guys will get this, but I do and it's funny. Germany is still full of hat-wearing drivers. The really bad ones are in Jettas, so we just look out for those.
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Old 10-29-2013, 03:00 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
That reminds me of a story:

"The other night I was invited out for a night with the “girls.” I told my husband that I would be home by midnight, “I promise!” Well, the hours passed and the margaritas went down way too easily. Around 3 a.m., a bit loaded, I headed for home. Just as I got in the door, the cuckoo clock in the hallway started up and cuckooed 3 times.

Quickly, realising my husband would probably wake up, I cuckooed another 9 times. I was really proud of myself for coming up with such a quick-witted solution, in order to escape a possible conflict with him. (Even when totally smashed… 3 cuckoos plus 9 cuckoos totals 12 cuckoos = MIDNIGHT !)

The next morning my husband asked me what time I got in, I told him “MIDNIGHT”… he didn’t seem pissed off in the least. Whew, I got away with that one! Then he said “We need a new cuckoo clock.” When I asked him why, he said, “Well, last night our clock cuckooed three times, then said “oh shit” Cuckooed 4 more times, cleared its throat, cuckooed another three times, giggled, cuckooed twice more, and then tripped over the coffee table and farted."
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:46 AM   #49
DAKEZ OP
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Old 10-30-2013, 05:15 AM   #50
fallingoff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
Not sure how many US guys will get this, but I do and it's funny. Germany is still full of hat-wearing drivers. The really bad ones are in Jettas, so we just look out for those.
Yeh the best bit of advice my father gave me.
Has saved me many times.
Cheers
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Old 10-30-2013, 09:49 AM   #51
beendog
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
Dirt riding and street riding, I study what is close and what is far from my front wheel, and on the street, what is behind and next to me.
Dirt riding, I always have to pick a line, and look for other bikes/jeeps/horses/hikers on the trail well in advance.
50 or 60 mph does not give you lots of time to slow down for something coming the other way.

Since a very young age, I do not go around blind turns faster then I can react for something being in the trail or street. Even if its a wet spot on the road.

I have not been down on the street in 35 years.
You are basically my hero on these forums.
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:07 PM   #52
NJ-Brett
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Well, I ride the way I like.
I have no problem with people gearing up and pushing the limits if they want, as long as they accept the risk, and don't blame others or other things when shit happens.

I do not think I am a very good rider, other then from the not crashing on the street standpoint.



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You are basically my hero on these forums.
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:15 PM   #53
dwoodward
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
I do not think I am a very good rider, other then from the not crashing on the street standpoint.
Depends on how you define "good rider", doesn't it?

I'm perfectly OK with your riding.
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:45 PM   #54
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They do not call them acts of God for nothing. Some things are unavoidable, and that is something you must contend with every day.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...rash-1.2127008
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:04 PM   #55
Stan_R80/7
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I remember after the September 2001 attacks an Air Force Major gave a brief presentation at the Saint Joan of Arc Catholic Church. There, he described some of the Saudi Arabian Islamic religious culture and laws. One part stood out: If someone is involved in an traffic accident, they are guilty - regardless of who is 'at fault'. If you are in an accident, either you or God is responsible.

A redeeming quality of motorcycle riders is their personal responsibility. If you aren't being responsible, then you had best hope God (or a guardian angel) is watching because you cannot sue the 'at fault' party from the grave. That's a legal precedent.

Stan_R80/7 screwed with this post 10-31-2013 at 01:58 AM Reason: 2011 -> 2001 (whoops)
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:38 PM   #56
Florida Lime
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan_R80/7 View Post
I remember after the September 2011 attacks an Air Force Major gave a brief presentation at the Saint Joan of Arc Catholic Church. There, he described some of the Saudi Arabian Islamic religious culture and laws. One part stood out: If someone is involved in an traffic accident, they are guilty - regardless of who is 'at fault'. If you are in an accident, either you or God is responsible.

A redeeming quality of motorcycle riders is their personal responsibility. If you aren't being responsible, then you had best hope God (or a guardian angel) is watching because you cannot sue the 'at fault' party from the grave. That's a legal precedent.
September 2011, or 2001 ?
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:45 AM   #57
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I love this thread. I went into street riding very timidly this summer, after having ridden dirt for 12 years. I heard all the statistics, the 'donor cycle' remarks, etc. After roughly 3,000 street miles this season, it's amazing how easily close calls can be avoided by simply riding safely. Not saying street riding is safe by any means, but not outriding your sight lines or assuming good road conditions or storming through intersections certainly makes it safeer. I've yet (knock on wood) to have a close call, save for a couple dickhead tailgaters who I simply pull over and let by. As OP stated, we're responsible for ourselves on the road, with dire consequences quickly handed to those who don't take the responsibility seriously. Around here, there's a plethora of frat boys on financed R1s, who ride out of control. They're easily distinguished by their sneakers, shorts, T-shirts and $200 gloves. Those are the donorcycles who make up the majority of statistics.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:54 AM   #58
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I think dirt riding has helped you a lot.
You just tend to look where you are going, study the surface, and you have automatic reactions, you do not have to think about using too much front brake, or what to do when the back wheel starts sliding, etc.

I see all kinds of bikes riding on the road out front of work. Its a deadly road, the kind that has a crash or two every day, and bikers ride it.
45 mph, people turning in every direction, people dodging the turners, the usual texters, etc.
I have seen cars upside down, cars into buildings, cars crash into gas tanker trucks, cars rear ended, broadsided.

I will see a guy on a chopper, no gear, girl on the back in a tank top, shorts and flip flops....

When they crash, they will say there was nothing they could have done.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallbastid View Post
I love this thread. I went into street riding very timidly this summer, after having ridden dirt for 12 years. I heard all the statistics, the 'donor cycle' remarks, etc. After roughly 3,000 street miles this season, it's amazing how easily close calls can be avoided by simply riding safely. Not saying street riding is safe by any means, but not outriding your sight lines or assuming good road conditions or storming through intersections certainly makes it safeer. I've yet (knock on wood) to have a close call, save for a couple dickhead tailgaters who I simply pull over and let by. As OP stated, we're responsible for ourselves on the road, with dire consequences quickly handed to those who don't take the responsibility seriously. Around here, there's a plethora of frat boys on financed R1s, who ride out of control. They're easily distinguished by their sneakers, shorts, T-shirts and $200 gloves. Those are the donorcycles who make up the majority of statistics.
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Old 10-31-2013, 11:31 AM   #59
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Of all the things I've learnt in (road) riding that has adjusted my attitude for the better, this is the one that stands out hands down as yielding the greatest safety benefits.

I had a (fairly minor, in the scheme of things) crash about 7 years ago that at the time, I genuinely 100% considered unavoidable. Witnesses who watched the events unfurl agreed with my perception of events and thankfully, as a result, the doddering old **** who shouldn't have been allowed out on his own, much less behind the wheel of a car, was made to pay for the damage to my bike.

Now, the chap who pulled out was indeed in the wrong and it was absolutely right that he was considered "in the wrong" and made to pay for it all. The thing is, if he'd killed me, that would have been absolutely zero consolation to me, much less my family.

About a year ago, I had a nearly identical incident (roundabout, surface containment, someone else fails to observe ROW), but this time, when the front locked up, I managed to let go, steered into the skid, got the bike under control and brought it to a stop. Gave the driver a finger wagging "don't do that again" gesture and rode off. The difference is, I'm a better rider now.

I can't do much about the idiots on the road. I can do a lot about how well I ride and how quickly my bike can stop. I think it's very healthy to focus on the things that are within my power to change, rather than treat all the things that aren't as excuses.
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Old 10-31-2013, 12:06 PM   #60
Tallbastid
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Agreed. It seems simple, but the biggest thing I think we can all do is to simply slow down a bit. It's tough, especially with how much fun a twisted wrist can provide, but slowing down gives more reaction time, plain and simple. easier to see the gravel in that corner, easier to stop or swerve in time to avoid the Buick pulling out ahead, etc. Following the speed limit is somewhat boring, considering what our bikes are capable of, but then again I've noticed I do enjoy the ride quite a bit more.

And yeah, dirt riding has helped a lot. Riding my bike is second nature, now I'm focused almost purely on traffic, road conditions, wildlife...my hands and feet control the bike without having to think about it. I proved this to myself yesterday. I took my VFR out for a 10 mile loop, then immediately got on my DRZ and did the same loop. I was uncomfortable and awkward on the VFR, but the DRZ felt like a glove, so to speak. People just beginning, who haven't had the dirt experience, must feel like I do on the VFR (I'd imagine). Having to learn to be comfortable on a bike while dealing with traffic and road conditions must be unnerving, to say the least.
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