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Old 10-29-2013, 06:08 PM   #31
Douf
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Originally Posted by ABuck99 View Post
Phil don't you have some pics of that section?
Not totally sure which area you're referring to Andrew., but fee free to use any of my Photobucket shots, if there's anything that looks suitable. I think I provided access to you guys some time ago.

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Old 10-30-2013, 08:30 AM   #32
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Day 5

Day 5: Wendover NV – Grays Lake State Forrest, ID
370 MILES

Anthony and I got up early and went down for breakfast to meet up with the other guys at 7.30am. Ironically, Phil, who was always the one to push us along for an early departure….. was absent. A quick call to his room and it was evident that despite all the excuses he gave us, he had slept in. Much laughter and a few snide comments ensued. Once again, even after not having to de-camp, we still managed to get rolling around 9.15am. We said our good byes to Stan who was on his way to Idaho Falls for repairs, and headed back out past the Bonneville Speedway and rejoined the route where we had finished up last night.





Today’s ride would take us around the Great Salt Lake on the old Trans-Continental Railroad line. We made wound around on the fast desert roads for the first 60 miles until we came to an intersection that Byways had let us know was washed out and impassable – we were later to find out from Casey B that he managed to ride through the huge wash out at night. Andrew took over the lead and we made really quick time to the start of the railroad grade.





The run up the rail road grade was a hoot. Super high speed stretches for 20 miles at a time – but we had to be alert for the detours around the abandoned bridges every couple of miles. Unfortunately, none of us seem to have any pics through this section - sorry. Phil said he hit triple digits at one point. Did I say this section was fast? The pattern soon became: flat out straight and flat sections for a mile or so, followed by a huge braking zone then 35-45mph chicane (sometimes filled with mud and water), then back onto the track. Repeat over and over for around 100 miles. Great fun was had by all. I was riding at the back of the pack when I came across Phil covered in mud pushing his bike out of a mud bog. Obviously he pushed the braking zone to the limit and failed to negotiate the 20ft mud hole. He was fine, so as a good friend does…..I laughed, and laughed and laughed.

At around 12ish we pulled into the “Golden Spike” for a quick break. This place was historically significant as it marked the meeting place for the East and West lines. None of us really wanted to pay the fee to check out the tourist centre, but we all checked out the pristinely restored steam engines replete with theme dressed characters through the fence. Unfortunately, I didn’t get any pics, but Phil managed to snap this classic.



We stopped for gas and lunch at a farmers Co-op on the outskirts of Brigham City – the deli here was really good! Leaving Brigham City, we climbed in elevation again and found a nice dirt road. I was leading through here and the navigation was a little dicey as it looked like the track we were meant to be on had been torn up and replaced by a freshly graded road about 400yds to the left. It was heading in the right direction, so I followed it being a little more cautious for pinch flats – it was rocky.

Now, as I have mentioned, we had seen some amazing sights on this trip so far (beautiful scenery, wildlife, drones and dog fights), but one of the highlights was coming up next. I was leading when I came up behind a strange sight that would keep us enthralled for the next day or so. At first I couldn’t make out exactly what it was, but following behind and studying (closely) it was apparent we were following a Polaris RZR with 2 rear flats. All I noticed however was a perfectly shaped woman’s butt (covered with spray on jeans) hanging over the roof and rear roll bar, accented with the occasional bob of a long blonde pony tail. Anthony pulled along side of me and we glanced at eachother through our visors. Then, inexplicably, Anthony sounds his horn to pass. Now I would estimate that Anthony and I have ridden at least 20,000 miles together, and never had I seen him perform such a stupid stunt.

We passed and continued on for a few more miles then pulled over for a chat. It went something like this:
Dave: “What the f#&% were you thinking?”
Anthony: mumble, grumble, excuse, excuse.
Dave: “I would have been happy to follow them all the way to Canada” (Honey, darling wife - if you are reading this, I would only have done this to make sure these poor stranded tourists made it safely to their destination).



The effect of this sight on our very male group was hysterical. Then, sure enough the said RZR comes around the corner and stops to talk. There were actually two beautiful young ladies – one on the roof, and one on the hood in similar attire trying to disembark their rattling transport, with a significantly older gentleman driving with a big grin on his face (must have been from the beautiful scenery…). The brunette on the front asks us how far to Bear Lake, and if we could give them a ride to their truck. A bit of a quandary really: Of course we were fully loaded, and it would have been unsafe for us to provide this type of assistance, so unfortunately we had to politely decline. Upon discussing the situation around the campfire later that night, there was at least one of our group who considered dumping all his luggage on the spot and taking one of the ladies. At least 3 more of the group (remember our group was now down to 4) were trying to work out how to fit the girls on the bikes while keeping our luggage on. I realize this story might not seem very plausible, and since all photographic evidence of the event was destroyed, you will all just have to take my word for it! BREAKING NEWS - A PHOTO OF THE RZR DEPARTING HAS JUST SURFACED.



We said good bye to our stranded trio, got our heads screwed back on, and continued on the dirt roads to HWY 89 where we turned right towards Garden City and Bear Lake. After gassing up, we headed south and east on HWY 30 for our longest slab section towards Kemmerer back in Wyoming. Gassed up again, and decided to push on and find a camp site somewhere up in the Grays Lake State Forest. Soon after Kemmer, the sealed road transformed into the smoothest, fastest gravel road I had ever seen. We followed the river up another 50 miles or so, passed lots and lots of hunters towing apartment complexes behind their trucks, and eventually found a nice state campground – once again, with a pile of firewood.

We were all tired after a fairly long and exhausting day, so we set up camp pretty quickly and sat around a fire having dinner and discussing the days ….events.
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:04 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Tragic Overlander View Post


Being the only single guy, I get stopped on the trail by cowboys & whisky and all the married dudes get cute chicks on top of Razors....bout right.


Before the report continues, I would like to see an in depth review of Phils baby blue onesy
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:18 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseyB View Post


Being the only single guy, I get stopped on the trail by cowboys & whisky and all the married dudes get cute chicks on top of Razors....bout right.


Before the report continues, I would like to see an in depth review of Phils baby blue onesy
It seems that he copped so much crap about it, he bought a new suit as soon as he got back I told him that the old suit would look good on my blow up.....friend.He didn't mention whether he also ditched the pretty Harley ballet slippers
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:44 AM   #35
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The gal in the middle was Pamela Anderson
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:08 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseyB View Post
Before the report continues, I would like to see an in depth review of Phils baby blue onesy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tragic Overlander View Post
It seems that he copped so much crap about it, he bought a new suit as soon as he got back I told him that the old suit would look good on my blow up.....friend.He didn't mention whether he also ditched the pretty Harley ballet slippers
Haven't you heathens heard of Austin Vince?



Looks like the boots are about the right height, and I have the accent down too. Only 80% there on the hair color though...

As David mentioned, upon returning home I did replace the suit, with an even more heinously colored high-viz version, scored off CL. A true onesy as well, rather than the wannabe blue version. However, should I have the distinct misfortune to ride with any of you drama queens in the future, the blue suit remains - much like my Australian friend - firmly entrenched in the closet.

Coincidentally, this months Adventure Bike Rider magazine includes an interview with Vince. He spends most of the article taking aim at LWR for ruining the concept of Adventure riding, since in his opinion - mainly due to Ewan and Charlie - the current perception of adventure riding is that one needs a $20000 bike and a cache of equally expensive clothing/equipment before setting off. It's a $12 magazine http://www.adventurebikerider.com/ne...8-out-now.html

Douf

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Old 10-30-2013, 06:22 PM   #37
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Day 6

Day 6: Grays Lake – Idaho Falls
120 miles

It got pretty cold overnight – which wasn’t helped by the fact that I did not put the fly on my tent. We started up a fire and huddled around until we could jump into an area warmed by the sun poking through the tree’s. This was a really pretty camp site. We had thought that having the pit toilets close by would be an advantage, but we didn’t count on the Griswald’s and their twenty cousins showing up in the middle of the night to destroy the facilities while leaving their diesel toy haulers running. Ahhh, the peace and serenity of remote camping…..

We took things a little slower leaving camp, as we knew we had a pretty short run into Idaho Falls. We hadn’t really set up a rendezvous with Stan when he left as we had no idea of how long it would take, but because of the big mileage we had done yesterday, we figured we were at least a half day ahead of schedule. We rolled out of camp and started climbing into the Idaho rolling hills that were wide and dotted with vast cow camps. This whole section was very busy, with lots of hunters providing a few scares. At one stage Phil and I were forced into a ditch by opposing traffic.





We stopped at a breathtaking scenic overlook for a quick snack, all the while in awe of the beautiful river below us surrounded by a stark granite cliff all around. As the rest of the group departed, I waited to make sure everyone was rolling. Sure enough, Phil’s 950 wouldn’t start. Our combined incredible powers of mechanical engineering determined that the problem was electrical. After 10 minutes of checking as much wiring and fuses as we could to no avail, we decided to trace right back to the battery – sure enough the positive terminal was loose. Phil had been complaining of intermittent power loss the whole ride. It would seem that when he replaced the battery on day 1, he had not tightened the terminal.



Off again, as fast as we could safely travel allowing for traffic, and about 15 miles up the road we ran into Anthony and Andrew who had brought back a whole search party for us – including Stan, Questor and Byways.



We stopped for introductions and a bit of a chin wag, and then continued on to our next stop for gas and lunch just down the road.



Apparently Stan had had his forks rebuilt by a local guy in Idaho Falls that Byways had recommended and he was very happy with the way they felt. He had met up with Questor and camped in his lawn – apparently the three of them had consumed a fair bit of some micro-brew as well. It was nice to catch up with Byways after 5 years, and Questor was also a great guy. I had read many of his ride reports over the years and it was great to finally meet him in person. He was kind enough to guide us the rest of the route into Idaho Falls, and then offered to let us all camp in his back yard – an offer that we eagerly accepted.



The remaining 50 odd miles was a fun and fast, but very dusty route along a windy range covered in huge white windmills. I have driven past these things a few times, but once you get really close you have a much better understanding of just how big they really are – and they were everywhere.







Once again, we battled with traffic on the busy weekend, and once again I ended up in a ditch as a guy in a Toyota Tundra pulling a 25ft trailer waived as he took up the whole road and left me nowhere to go. I think Phil, who was behind me, might have let him know that his actions were…..far from gentlemanly. Others might refer to his gestures as being some type of friendly salute....



Arriving at Questor’s place we were all in good spirits and the whole group was reunited. Questor was an incredibly gracious host and not only let us camp, but offered the use of his pressure washer and a hot shower. He obviously does this for a lot of ADV inmates as there was a sign on the wall explaining that all ADV inmates were to sign the world map shower curtain. Close inspection of the wall map showed many very familiar names – you know who you are.





Feeling relaxed, we heard the purr of a big KTM single and saw CaseyB roll up into the driveway. Apparently he was riding the Heart of the West as well on his 690 but had had Byways customize his route to include a couple of weeks around Moab. He was having the trip of a lifetime, and his was great to hear all about his adventure. Unfortunately, he had crashed earlier on in the day, but seemed to be well.

We all ’d for a while, and then Questor drove us all to a nice restaurant in his tricked out Tacoma. Byways joined us, and we bought him and Questor dinner as a small thanks for the hospitality and support they had both shown us all. We had a great night, a few adult beverages, many laughs.



It was great talking with Byways and we walked away with a new appreciation for his passion when it comes to adventure travel and specifically the historical significance of these remote western routes. He has literally spent a lifetime creating off road routes across the country. I think he was a little shocked at the pace we were travelling his route – especially due to the recent weather that had sometimes severely affected the track conditions. He did implore us to slow down a little and stop to take in the history. I mentioned that I would like to do this route again sometime in a 4x4…. Maybe one day.

Back to Questor’s place, a quick call to my wife and daughter, and then off to bed.
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Old 10-30-2013, 06:49 PM   #38
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H.o.w.

Sorry guys. Took me a little while to rifle through all the emoticons. apparently no good ride report is worth reading w/o them! as for the girls in tight jeans and hot butts go, I suppose I could have waited a few more minutes before sounding the "get out of the way" button.
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Old 10-30-2013, 07:08 PM   #39
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The land speed records you guys set rolling into our fair city shall no doubt stand for ages ...

As for the rituals of hunting season that you so keenly observed ... Well, getting hopped up on Mountain Dew, bailing out the cousins for a weekend of terrorizin' wildlife, haulin' a** down mountain roads with our doublewides in tow ... Now that's livin'. Ha ha ha ...

It really was great meeting you guys. Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you find your way back soon ...
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:51 AM   #40
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Day 7

Day 7: Idaho Falls to Gravelly Range, MT.

We packed up, said our thank you’s and good byes to Questor, and were on the road by about 8am. Casey B was scrambling a little, not used to having the set agenda of a group dynamic, rather soaking up the experience of travelling solo and enjoying the freedom of flowing as the circumstances dictate. Of course, first stop was 2 miles – Wally World for a top up of supplies. Right next door, we indulged in the sacred BMW tradition of……Starbucks. OK, so we all enjoy the luxury of a hot latte every now and then, but a pack of KTM’s lined up in front of a Starbucks??? I am sure, once again, all photographic evidence of said fictitious occurrence was destroyed. Next stop, gas and we were ready to roll……at about 9.15am.

Our route started out heading west into the plains, then north with the constant lure of the mountains in the distance. We blew through around 80 miles where you could count the number of turns on one hand – straight through fields and farm land for what felt like ages. At one point we were forced to stop for a group of ranchers mustering a few hundred head of sheep down the road. It was quite an experience, something that our Georgia boys had never seen.






Phil glanced over to me and made some incredibly ignorant and hurtful comments about “remind you of home”, erections, etc. While the rest of the group thought this was particularly funny, I was hurt mostly because Phil obviously thought that I was a Kiwi!!!





We stopped and checked out the historic school house of Edie – and posed for some pics.



Stanopedia went straight into the role of schoolmaster


Our very unruly class


Phil was quite turned on by this


Obviously requiring some discipline - for some inexplicable reason, he kept begging for more



Anthony of course continued with his book research - this particular bathroom didn't score very highly.



We arrived at the base of the mountain range and started climbing into the low clouds. It was a pretty ride with ominous signs of potential bad weather on the way. The rain held off though as we wound our way through some really fun terrain. We didn’t stop for much, but were forced to break while Andrew quickly fixed a rear flat (our first of the trip).





At one point Phil took the lead for the first time in the whole ride so far – the usually mild mannered and quiet guy (perhaps horribly embarrassed by the gaudy blue strippers riding suit complete with baby Harley booties) and raced off at the fastest we had ridden so far. Determined not to be outdone by a bloody Pom, I set off on his tail. At the end of the section we stopped and I said: “Holy sh#* Phil, that was fairly spirited”. He laughed and said: “Yeah. Now I’ve got it out of my system, I can go back to the back of the pack”.

The ride continued and we made it to the old Historic Town of Bannack, Montana. 
Bannack was a gold mining community and was at one time the capital of the MT Territory, and boasted the first jail in the state. This was a cool stop with old restored buildings, hotels, saloons, & a school house with a Masonic Temple upstairs. We all enjoyed touring about the town, and I was very intrigued by the significant role that vigilante’s played in the history of the region – it would make for a good movie.







Andrew and I were escorted straight to the jail




Old BMW final drives???


We headed into the town of Dillon running on fumes, gassed up and went for a late lunch. It was starting to rain hard by now, and we had to make a decision about where to camp. There wasn’t much in the way of hotels in Dillon, so we decided to push on another 80 miles or so up into the Gravelly Range – this road had only just opened up after the recent wild fires earlier in the Summer. We suited up, and headed straight out into a rainstorm. This slowed us down a bit as the roads were really slick, but we found a really nice hunting camp by the side of the road and alongside a beautiful river. We scrambled to get our tents set up, and then went in search of firewood during a very short break in the storm.



The storm set in for a while, and I took the opportunity to relax in my tent and read for a while. An hour or so later, I joined the group who had by this stage set up a fire and a makeshift shelter under Casey B’s tarpauline. Much deep conversation, a quick bag of dinner, and we all went off to our tents.
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Old 10-31-2013, 10:08 AM   #41
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Hey Dave, excellent ride report so far, looking forward to the "rest of the story." Adding the HOW route to my bucket list.
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Old 10-31-2013, 11:14 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tragic Overlander View Post
Day 7: Idaho Falls to Gravelly Range, MT.


Old BMW final drives???

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Old 10-31-2013, 01:53 PM   #43
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I call this one the 'prom pic'


.................edit............................. ....
Btw, what's up with this pic?

Must of come off of Questors kick ass Casio camera

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Old 10-31-2013, 04:10 PM   #44
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.................edit............................. ....
Btw, what's up with this pic?

Must of come off of Questors kick ass Casio camera[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the pics CaseyB I can't think what is wrong with the above pic. Was it missing half the group? Did it not show the cute waitress doing her best to avoid you?
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Old 10-31-2013, 05:18 PM   #45
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Day 8

Day 8: Gravelly Range, MT to Jackson Hole, WY
210 MILES

It was a pretty cold and wet night, and we awoke to another very cold morning. Frost on all our gear convinced us that we should start a fire and wait for the tents to dry out for a while.







Eventually we ended up packing up our wet tents, and headed off – grip warmers on. Check. Our plan today was to camp at Jackson Lake, but as we were to find out, “the best laid plans…..mice….men….”.

The roads conditions were much better than we were expecting after the steady rain over the past 24 hrs. The surface was mostly pretty tacky and the grip was good. The Gravelly Range was quite pretty and I could really tell that the expanses were getting much bigger between valleys and landmarks.









Soon after, we had a bit of a break as Stan had the first of two rear punctures for the day. A roofing nail was the culprit, but he swapped out the tube pretty quickly.





Andrew and I waited on the Historic Brundage bridge and once again solved many of the worlds problems.





We rode for a while in vast Montana ranching territory and wildlife refuges, and we saw that the mountain ranges were covered in a fresh layer of snow. Beautiful scenery, but it never really warmed up much.







We had a nice long lunch break and fuel stop at a place called Pond’s Lodge in the NorthEastern corner near Island park Reservoir which gave us an opportunity to warm up. After lunch we headed south and then the route took us by Mesa Falls – so we went to check them out. We wlaked around and took plenty of photo’s. The falls are quite spectacular and I really enjoyed the place. Casey B managed to scare the shit out of us by balancing his very expensive DSLR camera (he is quite a talented photographer) on a guide rail for a timed group shot.













All worked out fine, and we continued South through more Idaho ranch lands, then turned left and started climbing back into some very fun wooded areas. Stan picked up his second flat of the day, this time by some sort of euro wood screw. This one didn’t take long either as by this time, Phil and he were a precision pit team.



The next 75 miles were a blast just climbing up into beautiful pine forests. We started getting close to Jackson Lake and the decision was made to head to “Jenny Lake” for camp that came highly recommended from Stan. We battled through lots of toursist and traffic – focused on everything but the road they were driving on.









Eventually we made it to Jenny Lake – only to find that Jenny lake camp was full. All other organized camp sites in the area were closed for the season.



Tired and a little frustrated we had no choice but to push on to Jackson Hole where we found a hotel after a fairly lengthy search.

A hot shower cheered me up, and we decided to get a cab into town for dinner. We ended up going the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar – which really didn’t serve food. We had a few cocktails and I don’t think anyone was really enjoying themselves. It seemed wherever we went in that town, we were just not welcome, or we were at the mercy of the seemingly well established Russian mafia.

Casey did manage to buy his favorite sticker




At one point, Stan smiled while staring out at the dance floor and quipped: “You know what I really like about towns like Jackson and Aspen?....They are obviously caring communities….Look at all these caring uncles taking their nieces out for dinner”.
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