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Old 10-30-2013, 11:24 AM   #16
Tankad
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I would start with the euro bars or the "S" bars by Magura. this will need you to change out the cables (clutch, brake, ext.) and mirrors as well, because the new bars will make the original cables to long and the mirrors to short. this is an easy thing to do and a good starting point for someone new to mechanical things. It will also change the handling of the bike more in line with the style you are heading in. The gauge cluster can be more trouble than they are worth. you may want to change it out to an acewell gauge. this will be a more difficult job, but there are a ton of information on this forum for this job, so not impossible with your current skill sets.

good luck and welcome to the forum
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:28 PM   #17
AntonLargiader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xombiexplox View Post
- Odometer stopped working.
That can be fixed. Contact Wirespokes.

- Small amount of leaking fluids.

Find another Airhead owner locally. Save yourself a lot of time and expensive lessons.

Quote:
What I really want to accomplish is a complete tear-down, clean and lube everything, sand and paint the frame, maybe rewire all the electronics, new front and rear suspension, new cafe-ish seat and drop the handlebars.
Rather than clip-ons, try some wide flat bars. I have the 'Superbike' bend by... Renthal? No, someone else... on my R100R and I like it a lot. For tighter roads, wide bars absolutely rock.

You will probably want better brakes, so that front-end upgrade should be high on your list.
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:40 PM   #18
r60man
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I am not one of the anti cafe crowd. Your bike do with it as you wish. I will just give one piece of advice. The bigger bars are much easier to ride and control that shorter cafe style bars. I would definitely think about keeping it that way until you are fully accustomed to riding a bike. If you were not a noob to bikes I wouldn't even mention it. Nice looking bike, enjoy!
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:54 PM   #19
crazydrummerdude
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I'm in love.

As the owner of four 1974 airheads, I might have a little bit of insight to any peculiar things you might discover about our somewhat-unique-year models. If you have any questions, feel free to post them. There's a fair amount of mis/dis-information out there if you dig deep.

It's your bike and you can do what you want. Most of the old dudes here like to keep 'em stock if they're already stock. Yours isn't, so check out this thread for inspiration: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=252051

At 27, I am old enough to be a cranky old guy, but young enough to still absolutely love a well-executed cafe racer. If/when I find a non-stock airhead, I will do just that, but all these dang bikes I've been finding have been too nice to tear apart.. yet.

I recommend getting rid of the handlebar risers ASAP, and getting some "S" or "euro" bars. I tried Clubmans (the poor mans clip-ons) and they were just too dang low.

Be sure to post pictures of your progress.
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:39 PM   #20
Wirespokes
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Welcome to the forum!

You know, that's a touring motorcycle and I doubt there's enough road on Oahu for a decent tour.

I agree with what Anton said - low bars will change the feel of the bike and help handling. The stock BMW low bars are fairly narrow, but it is possible to get wider ones with a low rise. Sometimes they're called sidecar bars because more leverage is needed with a hack. And no, you won't need to change the cables if you convert to low bars - but some adjusting and re-arranging (re-routing) will be necessary to accommodate the extra length.

That looks like a fairly decent and original bike and I'd be hesitant to chop it up. If it was in really rough shape and it was the only thing I had to occupy my spare time for several months - maybe a complete teardown would be considered. But you have absolutely no idea of the scope of such a project if you think it could be done in a couple weeks or a month, especially when you've had no wrenching experience. Taking it apart is easy - going back together is something else entirely! Ask anyone here how many basket case bikes they've seen or gotten that really only needed to be re-assembled. A LOT!

Frankly, I prefer evolution to revolution - and what I mean by that is this: rather than taking it down to the last nut and bolt, checking everything and making it all like new, instead concentrate on the highest priority item first and take care of it best you can. Then the next and the next. That way you can be riding it and using it during the upgrade. It will also give you time to get in touch with the bike and get a feel for it.

For instance - the frame. Usually it's only scratched in a few places. It's pretty easy to sand any rust, primer and paint without removing anything. Mask off the engine or other things in the area and spray. Or POR has a good brush on paint that supposedly dries without leaving brush strokes. That's probably the route I'd take.

As for the odometer issue - that's quite possibly the most common failure for the whole 25-year-run of the airheads. Do get it repaired as it's possible for the odometer to jam and damage other parts in there.

My vote is to install low bars and a custom seat - if that's what turns you on - and get the brakes working well. There are those who say the ATE brakes will never work well, but that's wrong. They may not have been the best, as far as brakes go, but they can be made to work very well.
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Old 10-31-2013, 01:10 AM   #21
squish
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The islands are small so I'd start with finding out about the local airhead scene. If there is one.

Then I'd get the bike functioning first. Make sure it stops and goes.
The work on the cosmetic.

Hit the web and build a file of bikes that you like the style of. You know like an inspiration deal

Then you have an idea of what you are trying to do which in turn will give you an idea of what you need to do.

Those bars should go. Changing them will go a long long way to making the bike look and feel much better.

As for tools, the BMW tool roll or Cruztools both make decent tool kits that will give you a decent base of tools
Also get a multi meter and a book or two on motorcycle electronics.

Once you get into the project
Do something every day to further the project along.
That's one of the best ways of finishing something like this.

Good luck
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Old 10-31-2013, 02:10 AM   #22
mesher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wirespokes View Post
Frankly, I prefer evolution to revolution - and what I mean by that is this: rather than taking it down to the last nut and bolt, checking everything and making it all like new, instead concentrate on the highest priority item first and take care of it best you can. Then the next and the next. That way you can be riding it and using it during the upgrade. It will also give you time to get in touch with the bike and get a feel for it.
Good advice there. Another advantage of doing it a little at a time (and one thing at a time) and riding it in between is that it makes troubleshooting much easier, particularly while you are learning.

Say for example you change the handlebars and then find that the bike won't start or won't idle, it should be simple to find the problem because the only things you disturbed were some controls and cables, so maybe a throttle cable isn't fitted correctly. On the other hand, if your first project is to strip the entire bike down to the frame and reassemble using a lot of non-standard parts, it can be exponentially more difficult to find the source of a problem when you're done, and much harder for the greybeards on here to help you do it.

Congratulations on your bike and your new adventure.
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Old 10-31-2013, 03:31 AM   #23
I GS 1
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Something like this is what I would be aiming at. I love it

http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...51879&page=292

I GS 1 screwed with this post 10-31-2013 at 03:59 AM
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Old 10-31-2013, 04:44 AM   #24
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xombiexplox View Post
So, this is my first motorcycle ever and the first time I've ever taken on something mechanical and manly.

I'm wanting to clean it up nice and lose some weight (on the bike) and add some power! Do you guys have any recommendations for a COMPLETE first timer?

I'm buying tools this weekend, and I've already got the hardcover Haynes service manual. Now that I've got the bike and the drive, the hard part's over right?? ;)
"... recommendations for a COMPLETE first timer?"

I'm the not-nice-guy, so here's just for you...

Get your head strait. Learn to ride the thing before you worry about becoming a fashonista. As you will learn in your rider class, first 6 months riding and first 6 months on a new-to-you bike are the most deadly. Get through that alive, then worry about being kewl.

Get some "excellence in motorcycling" type books and read them. Avoid books on how to be Joe Racer Jr. You want to know road survival--lane positioning and strategy and stuff like that. Also the basics of being non-stupid on a bike. I have some solid, but badly scuffed leathers I bought used off a young guy very recently retired from riding. I got to meet him,..he was still in a wheelchair, just out of the hospital, being pushed around by the GF. Expected to pretty much recover fully, walk fine, etc. He wouldn't ride again, nor would his brothers or the rest of the family, all of whom were big into bikes. Everything was for sale except an antique Triumph. The marks on the leathers say a lot about his crash. I can look at them anytime, while riding, and get a reminder.

My riding mentor told me two things I never forget:

1) If you're afraid too much, you won't have any fun. If you're not afraid enough, you die.

2) Never underestimate how cold it can get on a motorcycle.

You will drop the bike, several times, usually at a stand still or near standstill. Noobie dues, everyone pays 'em. You have foolishly started with a "dream bike" rather then a beater beginner bike. Make the best of it and minimize the damage. Fit some crash bars, even rusty crusty ones. lose 'em later. You really want to preserve those rocker covers. Fitting old beat rocker covers is also an option. The newer style, while not preferred by the stylin' crowd (or at least the vast bulk of them that go by formulas rather than any innate styling sense.) are much tougher. You may have to ask around to score a nice beat up set. people don't think they have value and seldom post them for sale---or they get converted into reinforced off road covers.

Keep the bars. If anything, slide the controls inboard an inch. Again, beat those up with the oopsies and toss 'em for the nice stuff later. The higher wider bar will make for an easier bike to ride for the moment.

As it stands you don't look right on the bike. One of the keys to survival on a motorcycle is PAYING ATTENTION. Try paying attention to your posture. The spine is kept strait, no slumping forward or backward. What use making it all Kaffeeeed up if you don't look like a rider on it? You'll pick up the reversed-hand-on-the-thigh body English later. For the moment do like the Dressage crowd does. Correct posture.

"...something mechanical and manly.". bullshit. Lose it.

Have some links. I suspect Anke-eve Goldman was a lesbian, the others most certainly not. Research her a bit, What she did with Harro and leather gear is interesting.

Posture: http://www.mklsportster.com/ttr60.jpg
There is a much better pic. in the Girl on an old motorcycle thread. can't find at the moment. The one where all the guys got hot and bothered. Simple looking gal, 30's? nice enough figure, street clothes, dead pan expression...but everyone was going 'WOW, she's a rider!". Several commented it was a riders body English doing it. Believe it or not, the BOBs are boring. Where the guys fantasies get worked up is over a woman who rides, not the poseurs and models.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=269
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=618
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=737


You nave some mechanical problems. Looks like favorable ones for getting to know the bike. The cylinder base seals are weeping. Common, can be ignored, in your case given the corrosion on the engine, a benefit for the moment. The Timing chain chest to block gasket is weeping at the bottom. Also common at higher mileages. Also can be ignored. But it looks like the cam nose seal and/or front crank seal is leaking. Not good. Won't kill you, watch your oil level. But if oil gets on the points, esp. from the cam nose seal, you will have running problems.So learn to remove the front cover without damaging the diode board and have a look around.

You also have some cosmetic problems. You can bolt on all the Kool Kiddie stuff, but if the engine is corroded up and looks like hell, well, the bike just looks bad. The front cover is a good place to start looking into fixes. For one it fits in the sink and it's easy to hold in your lap. Getting the white rust off is easy. Keeping it gone is very difficult. Explore fixes on this one. From my researches only barrier coatings (some sort of paint) work. But I once tried an impregnation routine on a front cover as a test. Never got to find out how well it worked tho. This is stuff you can look into as you are getting through your initial learning curve on riding---and lay plans.

Remove the tank. It should be near empty the first time. Watch the tank nose (front top) VERY carefully so you don't chip up the paint. Stuffing a rag in there can be wise. Set it down so you neither damage nor get dirt in the petcocks. Look at the master cylinder bolted on top of the frame backbone towards the front. It's the rusty thing with the plastic reservoir on it. The paint under it is usually a disaster. brake fluid strips paint AND attracts moisture. Clean up that area with steel wool and some alcohol and coat with vaseline for the moment. You can unstrap the thing and lift it an inch without disconnecting the line or cable. Have a look around at the wiring. It's very bodged at the bars, look for more hack work.

The right center rocker nut is missing. It's 99.3% cosmetic and very easy to strip. Remove the cover and explore. Easy to repair a couple ways if stripped. Can wait but it's another of those have-a-look around items.

if you fit lower bars, you need to unboge the wiring at some point for cosmetic reasons. Replacing the cables with the correct lengths is both cosmetic and functional. Big loose loops in the cables make for sloppy controls.

Remove the dipstick and smell it. Remove the rear shaft fill plug and smell that. Dip something in the green oil drip and smell that. Now you know how to tell gear oil from engine oil. Unless you have zero sense of smell. Thick green is usually transmission (gear) oil. Just keep it topped up for the moment. No synthetics. Leaky shift shaft seals and sometimes neutral switches or clutch pushrods are classic. Easy fix. Some wiping and watching will reveal where it is leaking from. Engine oil leaks are usually a bad (reused too often) drain pug washer. Trivial. New washer next oil change. trying to tighten things to fix oil leaks is a dead move unless you use a torque wrench. Still a dead move more times than not. The last guy already tried that. They are close to stripping.

The oil leak that matters most is at the rear drive. Can trash expensive brake shoes. Remove rear wheel, lube the splines, make sure the oil drain holes are clear and there is no sign of leekage. It's gear oil back there. Someone mentioned to get a CLymers. You get what you pay for. It's three times the manual that the Haynes is--corresponding price. it also has errors, some can lead to bad things happening. Ask about procedures and if there are any gotchas in the Clymer instructions.


If you don't know exactly what a gestalt is, find out. You might be looking at all the little stuff like chips in the frame paint, but everyone else sees the gestalt. It's the stance and the gesture of the bike that really makes or breaks it. Get that right and the bike looks right. Get it wrong and you have yet another yawner....no matter if the frame is freshly powder coated or not. As I mentioned, you sitting on it is part of the gestalt. You have to look right too..

Learn how to adjust the footpegs and rear brake. Then as you ride more and more, set them up to suit yourself. Ditto the hand controls.

Your first expense is good riding gear. if you want to be cafe stylin', try a old, scuffed, genuine and somewhat oversize bomber style leather jacket. But think thrice about an open faced helmet. Many wear them forever. I've had experiences that illustrate what no amount of facial reconstructive surgery will ever fix. So I wear a full face. A costly one. It's my one big expense (followed by race gauntlet type gloves, real ones). I wear leather always, bought all but one jacket used for a tiny fraction of the price of even crap textile gear. The majority of the new stuff in any material is vastly overpriced. Actual American made Vanson or Johnson Leathers jackets/pants would be sort-of exceptions. Big bucks tho'. Draggin' jeans or similar armored jeans will do for pants although to look right, you wear leather. I wear perf in the summer. Beware kiddie gloves. Lots of bits and pieces sewn up to look like some futuristic battle hero or something out of a video game, carbon fiber bits sewn in that blow out on contact when the stitching blows out on contact... Try the Elkskin ropers from Aerostitch. You can dye them yourself if you like. Consult Tandy for the correct stuff.

if you don't know what helmet hair is, you will. Get some cotton helmet liners. 3 or 4 so you always have a dry one with you. They get soaked with sweat quickly, but they keep the inside of the helmet clean and can reduce helmet itch on longer runs.

The poser bikes in the pics are doing their main thing; posing. But when you actually go for a ride, like for the day, you want some things with you. Rain gear, purse stuff and phone, a bottle of water (even in the rain dehydration is a major issue on an open bike, beware it. maintain urine volume.) snackage, etc. A tankbag or small rear duffle will do. If you go with the rear pack, make sure you have a place for it. You do not want to wear packs on the body or slung over a shoulder.---maybe if you have race grade spine armor. You can take a couple lbs off the bike immediately by removing the racks and bag brackets. With a full seat there is a place to strap on a small rear pack (or even a big one). Solo seat and rear fako racer pod, it starts getting iffy. You would want a tank bag. There are some "sportbike" panniers that work. Can be hard on paint.

Hit the gym and get some serious free weight training. What you want is to learn some body mechanics. Makes little tasks like picking it up and putting it on the center stand a snap. You have the strength, some training in how to apply it is valuable, I have taught a number of people how to center stand their bikes, including one very petite woman. They were all surprised how easy it was when they positioned their bodies correctly and thought the right thoughts. The airhead has advantages in the pick it up dept, it doesn't go over so far. You can lay it over on one jug on the lawn (have help) and then practice picking it up. Even better with crash bars fitted. Also use of a Dynabee or similar to improve grip strength will strengthen your front brake, for cheap..

Good luck.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:52 AM   #25
rambozo
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Location: N. Ireland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
"...

As it stands you don't look right on the bike. One of the keys to survival on a motorcycle is PAYING ATTENTION. Try paying attention to your posture. The spine is kept strait, no slumping forward or backward. What use making it all Kaffeeeed up if you don't look like a rider on it? You'll pick up the reversed-hand-on-the-thigh body English later. For the moment do like the Dressage crowd does. Correct posture

F@ck sake man, she's sitting on the bike for a photo, not doing a lap of the
Nurburgring

Nice looking bike, as everyone says maybe get used to it for a while before
spending big bucks on it, airheads are a good starter bike IMO, nice and light
with sensible power, but as a learner expect to drop it once or twice!

Good luck with it whatever your plans evolve into
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:55 AM   #26
patrkbukly
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Location: Miami, FL.
Oddometer: 637
"Drop your saws all…

…and put your hands behind your head !"


Trust me when I tell you, as the wave of folks run to chop em up, soon the coolest thing left will be the uncut…and when that wave runs, then there will be nothing to run to …and you will be the coolest.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:56 AM   #27
Zodiac
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Joined: Aug 2001
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 30,865
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
"... recommendations for a COMPLETE first timer?"

I'm the not-nice-guy, so here's just for you...

Get your head strait. Learn to ride the thing before you worry about becoming a fashonista. As you will learn in your rider class, first 6 months riding and first 6 months on a new-to-you bike are the most deadly. Get through that alive, then worry about being kewl.

Get some "excellence in motorcycling" type books and read them. Avoid books on how to be Joe Racer Jr. You want to know road survival--lane positioning and strategy and stuff like that. Also the basics of being non-stupid on a bike. I have some solid, but badly scuffed leathers I bought used off a young guy very recently retired from riding. I got to meet him,..he was still in a wheelchair, just out of the hospital, being pushed around by the GF. Expected to pretty much recover fully, walk fine, etc. He wouldn't ride again, nor would his brothers or the rest of the family, all of whom were big into bikes. Everything was for sale except an antique Triumph. The marks on the leathers say a lot about his crash. I can look at them anytime, while riding, and get a reminder.

My riding mentor told me two things I never forget:

1) If you're afraid too much, you won't have any fun. If you're not afraid enough, you die.

2) Never underestimate how cold it can get on a motorcycle.

You will drop the bike, several times, usually at a stand still or near standstill. Noobie dues, everyone pays 'em. You have foolishly started with a "dream bike" rather then a beater beginner bike. Make the best of it and minimize the damage. Fit some crash bars, even rusty crusty ones. lose 'em later. You really want to preserve those rocker covers. Fitting old beat rocker covers is also an option. The newer style, while not preferred by the stylin' crowd (or at least the vast bulk of them that go by formulas rather than any innate styling sense.) are much tougher. You may have to ask around to score a nice beat up set. people don't think they have value and seldom post them for sale---or they get converted into reinforced off road covers.

Keep the bars. If anything, slide the controls inboard an inch. Again, beat those up with the oopsies and toss 'em for the nice stuff later. The higher wider bar will make for an easier bike to ride for the moment.

As it stands you don't look right on the bike. One of the keys to survival on a motorcycle is PAYING ATTENTION. Try paying attention to your posture. The spine is kept strait, no slumping forward or backward. What use making it all Kaffeeeed up if you don't look like a rider on it? You'll pick up the reversed-hand-on-the-thigh body English later. For the moment do like the Dressage crowd does. Correct posture.

"...something mechanical and manly.". bullshit. Lose it.

Have some links. I suspect Anke-eve Goldman was a lesbian, the others most certainly not. Research her a bit, What she did with Harro and leather gear is interesting.

Posture: http://www.mklsportster.com/ttr60.jpg
There is a much better pic. in the Girl on an old motorcycle thread. can't find at the moment. The one where all the guys got hot and bothered. Simple looking gal, 30's? nice enough figure, street clothes, dead pan expression...but everyone was going 'WOW, she's a rider!". Several commented it was a riders body English doing it. Believe it or not, the BOBs are boring. Where the guys fantasies get worked up is over a woman who rides, not the poseurs and models.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=269
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=618
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=737


You nave some mechanical problems. Looks like favorable ones for getting to know the bike. The cylinder base seals are weeping. Common, can be ignored, in your case given the corrosion on the engine, a benefit for the moment. The Timing chain chest to block gasket is weeping at the bottom. Also common at higher mileages. Also can be ignored. But it looks like the cam nose seal and/or front crank seal is leaking. Not good. Won't kill you, watch your oil level. But if oil gets on the points, esp. from the cam nose seal, you will have running problems.So learn to remove the front cover without damaging the diode board and have a look around.

You also have some cosmetic problems. You can bolt on all the Kool Kiddie stuff, but if the engine is corroded up and looks like hell, well, the bike just looks bad. The front cover is a good place to start looking into fixes. For one it fits in the sink and it's easy to hold in your lap. Getting the white rust off is easy. Keeping it gone is very difficult. Explore fixes on this one. From my researches only barrier coatings (some sort of paint) work. But I once tried an impregnation routine on a front cover as a test. Never got to find out how well it worked tho. This is stuff you can look into as you are getting through your initial learning curve on riding---and lay plans.

Remove the tank. It should be near empty the first time. Watch the tank nose (front top) VERY carefully so you don't chip up the paint. Stuffing a rag in there can be wise. Set it down so you neither damage nor get dirt in the petcocks. Look at the master cylinder bolted on top of the frame backbone towards the front. It's the rusty thing with the plastic reservoir on it. The paint under it is usually a disaster. brake fluid strips paint AND attracts moisture. Clean up that area with steel wool and some alcohol and coat with vaseline for the moment. You can unstrap the thing and lift it an inch without disconnecting the line or cable. Have a look around at the wiring. It's very bodged at the bars, look for more hack work.

The right center rocker nut is missing. It's 99.3% cosmetic and very easy to strip. Remove the cover and explore. Easy to repair a couple ways if stripped. Can wait but it's another of those have-a-look around items.

if you fit lower bars, you need to unboge the wiring at some point for cosmetic reasons. Replacing the cables with the correct lengths is both cosmetic and functional. Big loose loops in the cables make for sloppy controls.

Remove the dipstick and smell it. Remove the rear shaft fill plug and smell that. Dip something in the green oil drip and smell that. Now you know how to tell gear oil from engine oil. Unless you have zero sense of smell. Thick green is usually transmission (gear) oil. Just keep it topped up for the moment. No synthetics. Leaky shift shaft seals and sometimes neutral switches or clutch pushrods are classic. Easy fix. Some wiping and watching will reveal where it is leaking from. Engine oil leaks are usually a bad (reused too often) drain pug washer. Trivial. New washer next oil change. trying to tighten things to fix oil leaks is a dead move unless you use a torque wrench. Still a dead move more times than not. The last guy already tried that. They are close to stripping.

The oil leak that matters most is at the rear drive. Can trash expensive brake shoes. Remove rear wheel, lube the splines, make sure the oil drain holes are clear and there is no sign of leekage. It's gear oil back there. Someone mentioned to get a CLymers. You get what you pay for. It's three times the manual that the Haynes is--corresponding price. it also has errors, some can lead to bad things happening. Ask about procedures and if there are any gotchas in the Clymer instructions.


If you don't know exactly what a gestalt is, find out. You might be looking at all the little stuff like chips in the frame paint, but everyone else sees the gestalt. It's the stance and the gesture of the bike that really makes or breaks it. Get that right and the bike looks right. Get it wrong and you have yet another yawner....no matter if the frame is freshly powder coated or not. As I mentioned, you sitting on it is part of the gestalt. You have to look right too..

Learn how to adjust the footpegs and rear brake. Then as you ride more and more, set them up to suit yourself. Ditto the hand controls.

Your first expense is good riding gear. if you want to be cafe stylin', try a old, scuffed, genuine and somewhat oversize bomber style leather jacket. But think thrice about an open faced helmet. Many wear them forever. I've had experiences that illustrate what no amount of facial reconstructive surgery will ever fix. So I wear a full face. A costly one. It's my one big expense (followed by race gauntlet type gloves, real ones). I wear leather always, bought all but one jacket used for a tiny fraction of the price of even crap textile gear. The majority of the new stuff in any material is vastly overpriced. Actual American made Vanson or Johnson Leathers jackets/pants would be sort-of exceptions. Big bucks tho'. Draggin' jeans or similar armored jeans will do for pants although to look right, you wear leather. I wear perf in the summer. Beware kiddie gloves. Lots of bits and pieces sewn up to look like some futuristic battle hero or something out of a video game, carbon fiber bits sewn in that blow out on contact when the stitching blows out on contact... Try the Elkskin ropers from Aerostitch. You can dye them yourself if you like. Consult Tandy for the correct stuff.

if you don't know what helmet hair is, you will. Get some cotton helmet liners. 3 or 4 so you always have a dry one with you. They get soaked with sweat quickly, but they keep the inside of the helmet clean and can reduce helmet itch on longer runs.

The poser bikes in the pics are doing their main thing; posing. But when you actually go for a ride, like for the day, you want some things with you. Rain gear, purse stuff and phone, a bottle of water (even in the rain dehydration is a major issue on an open bike, beware it. maintain urine volume.) snackage, etc. A tankbag or small rear duffle will do. If you go with the rear pack, make sure you have a place for it. You do not want to wear packs on the body or slung over a shoulder.---maybe if you have race grade spine armor. You can take a couple lbs off the bike immediately by removing the racks and bag brackets. With a full seat there is a place to strap on a small rear pack (or even a big one). Solo seat and rear fako racer pod, it starts getting iffy. You would want a tank bag. There are some "sportbike" panniers that work. Can be hard on paint.

Hit the gym and get some serious free weight training. What you want is to learn some body mechanics. Makes little tasks like picking it up and putting it on the center stand a snap. You have the strength, some training in how to apply it is valuable, I have taught a number of people how to center stand their bikes, including one very petite woman. They were all surprised how easy it was when they positioned their bodies correctly and thought the right thoughts. The airhead has advantages in the pick it up dept, it doesn't go over so far. You can lay it over on one jug on the lawn (have help) and then practice picking it up. Even better with crash bars fitted. Also use of a Dynabee or similar to improve grip strength will strengthen your front brake, for cheap..

Good luck.


Hey Plaka.... you forgot to tell her exactly what kind of coffee she needs to drink, and specifically how to make it.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:21 AM   #28
Plaka
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Hey Plaka.... you forgot to tell her exactly what kind of coffee she needs to drink, and specifically how to make it.
I've never cared for the taste of coffee. Don't drink it or know how to buy or make it. I have had some, on a trip when I was freezing and broke and the coffee was hot and free at every rest area. Lot of sugar and creamer stuff to quench the taste and it warmed me up.

Doesn't have anything to do with motorcycling AFAIK anyway.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:59 AM   #29
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Doesn't have anything to do with motorcycling AFAIK anyway.
But presumed sexual preferences of linked lady-bikers somehow does?
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:05 AM   #30
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But presumed sexual preferences of linked lady-bikers somehow does?
Guessed you missed the context. if you know the Dykes on Bikes crowd at all (out of SFO) you'd know that "mechanical...manly" line could get your head handed to you. I don't blame a youth for having a pretty narrow view of the world...have some links...
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