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Old 10-31-2013, 08:14 AM   #31
Zodiac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
Guessed you missed the context. if you know the Dykes on Bikes crowd at all (out of SFO) you'd know that "mechanical...manly" line could get your head handed to you. I don't blame a youth for having a pretty narrow view of the world...have some links...
Well then, it's good thing she has a tap to your "broad" world view than.....
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:17 AM   #32
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Very cool. This is something that I would eventually like to do myself.
Here's a bit of bike porn of what i would like to have at the end. Your dream may differ but you may see things that may work on your build.


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Old 10-31-2013, 08:26 AM   #33
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That is one of Plaka's longest. (as if long isn't his best suit)

You are young enough to handle the squid or bent over position on a bike. The Airhead will be bent over some with smaller, flatter bars but it's not really squid until you do rear sets (move the foot pegs). The reason us older guys object all the time to this is that we can't hold a position like this for a whole day or for too many hours even. The sitting up straight position is easier on the spine and the neck and the arms and elbows. So keep this in mind as you make changes. If your arms get too tired or the neck hurts or your back is in pain after a day on the bike you may have to forgo the looks for something that works. But many who can handle the flat bars do prefer them.

I've seen that bike before. It's cute. The idea mentioned before is very helpful. That is, make changes one at a time. This helps to keep the bike running because it gets difficult especially for a NooB if the bike won't start after you have messed with the carbs, the ignition, the wiring and anything else. If all you did was change the handle bars then that's a lead where any problems are and then next week after the problems have been solved you can work or something else.

Another idea that I don't think has been mentioned but should, when you start taking parts off for whatever reason, say you want to remove the rear fender to save weight? (rear fenders weight about a pound) And have really thought this was so much better for the next two months you were riding? Don't get rid of the fender. For one it rains almost everyday in Hawaii and eventually you may find you'd like the fender back for protection from the water that has been getting all over you. And #2, some day the bike may be sold and original equipment will be a desirable asset for selling.

Again, Good Luck with it and remember to have fun.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:32 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Zodiac View Post
Well then, it's good thing she has a tap to your "broad" world view than.....
so to speak
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:42 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
I've never cared for the taste of coffee. Don't drink it or know how to buy or make it. I have had some, on a trip when I was freezing and broke and the coffee was hot and free at every rest area. Lot of sugar and creamer stuff to quench the taste and it warmed me up.

Doesn't have anything to do with motorcycling AFAIK anyway.

Nor does your leg-humping.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:50 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
That is one of Plaka's longest. (as if long isn't his best suit)

You are young enough to handle the squid or bent over position on a bike. The Airhead will be bent over some with smaller, flatter bars but it's not really squid until you do rear sets (move the foot pegs). The reason us older guys object all the time to this is that we can't hold a position like this for a whole day or for too many hours even. The sitting up straight position is easier on the spine and the neck and the arms and elbows. So keep this in mind as you make changes. If your arms get too tired or the neck hurts or your back is in pain after a day on the bike you may have to forgo the looks for something that works. But many who can handle the flat bars do prefer them.

I've seen that bike before. It's cute. The idea mentioned before is very helpful. That is, make changes one at a time. This helps to keep the bike running because it gets difficult especially for a NooB if the bike won't start after you have messed with the carbs, the ignition, the wiring and anything else. If all you did was change the handle bars then that's a lead where any problems are and then next week after the problems have been solved you can work or something else.

Another idea that I don't think has been mentioned but should, when you start taking parts off for whatever reason, say you want to remove the rear fender to save weight? (rear fenders weight about a pound) And have really thought this was so much better for the next two months you were riding? Don't get rid of the fender. For one it rains almost everyday in Hawaii and eventually you may find you'd like the fender back for protection from the water that has been getting all over you. And #2, some day the bike may be sold and original equipment will be a desirable asset for selling.

Again, Good Luck with it and remember to have fun.
I liked a lower bar on my open airhead. On the road, you can lay on the wind and there isn't a lot of pressure on your wrists. behind a fairing is another matter and I've raised my bars an inch and am working carefully with the ergos to get a neutral wrist position. I also use a paddle on the throttle to ease load on the right wrist. As I've aged I have more problems with my hips, but I was never a big one for riding more then 100 mile pitches. oddly, on my K100RS I could easily ride long pitches---something about the ergos on that bike worked very well.

I also cut my bars narrow...my thing is going real fast in straighter lines rather than cutting up the canyons. But I did have it screw me once in an emergency when I had to dodge a turning car at low speed. I ended up hitting it on three sides, and wrenching my back up from the effort at the bars. Didn't go down tho'

I agree on taking the stock parts off and carefully storing them, then hacking up secondary parts. Stuff from the boneyard can be great.

As far as I can tell, the starter and battery are the only places to lose real weight. The rest is BS, you might save 10lbs with a lot of work and expense and get a far less usable bike. I have to laugh at the ones that take this and that off to "lighten it up", and then put on huge chunky tires to be stylin'. The worst place to add weight, and kills the handling to boot.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:53 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSAragazzi View Post
Very cool. This is something that I would eventually like to do myself.
Here's a bit of bike porn of what i would like to have at the end.
It doesn't float my boat, it's as though it can't make up its mind quite what to be, so it's pulling in too many directions at once. Sorta designed by a committee.

What struck me about it is how much a black tank with a pinstripe says 'BMW', it's a really powerful motif.

I think this one posted earlier is just gorgeous. Not sure about brown seats, but the overall proportions are lovely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I GS 1 View Post
Something like this is what I would be aiming at. I love it
http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...51879&page=292
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Old 10-31-2013, 09:02 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mesher View Post
It doesn't float my boat, it's as though it can't make up its mind quite what to be, so it's pulling in too many directions at once. Sorta designed by a committee.

What struck me about it is how much a black tank with a pinstripe says 'BMW', it's a really powerful motif.

I think this one posted earlier is just gorgeous. Not sure about brown seats, but the overall proportions are lovely.
Exactly! This is why building a cafe racer is cool. Your vision will differ from mine, therefore there will be only one of each. Plus we can appreciate there others designs without having to live with them day in day out.
Makes it easy to find your bike after bar hopping or at a bike rally too
Cheers
Can't wait to see what you come up with
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Old 10-31-2013, 04:34 PM   #39
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If the OP is still around: you look young enough to be pretty familiar with forums, but just in case... you can ignore someone's posts by visiting their profile and then (under their name) hit the menu for User Links and then Add to Ignore List.
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Old 10-31-2013, 05:03 PM   #40
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However, do not ignore ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ him; he's got the info you'll need, sooner or later.


Bueller? Bueller?
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:01 PM   #41
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However, do not ignore ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ him; he's got the info you'll need, sooner or later.
It's true. He's a valuable addition around here. He's got serious knowledge. But he's not indespensable. Sooner or later his perspective does become relevant .. but for to novice airhead mechanic, he's much too esoteric.

No offense intended, just realize that 'our' mission should be to get people interested and 'in love' with these machines. That's how they will stay alive forever. Not by telling people what they can and can't do with them. Make people fall in love ... then they will love. It's that simple.

If the OP is still around, do what you want. We are here to help you with your dreams.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:31 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Beater View Post

If the OP is still around, do what you want. We are here to help you with your dreams.
+1

My bike has a soul. I'm sure yours does too....good luck at your MSF class.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:36 PM   #43
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Welcome to ADV! I see you've met our resident, Plaka.
He's our very own brand of special.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:38 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post
If the OP is still around: you look young enough to be pretty familiar with forums, but just in case... you can ignore someone's posts by visiting their profile and then (under their name) hit the menu for User Links and then Add to Ignore List.
While quick, that method can have some downsides. You may want to make your own presence on the forums invisible first.

This link works too, and you don't need to change anything to be discrete about things: http://www.advrider.com/forums/profi...?do=ignorelist
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:15 PM   #45
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While Plaka can be blunt - what he said is the absolute non sugarcoated truth. Except for the posture thing - I think that's going a bit over the top to assume you don't have the correct posture from a posed photo.

It's ok to have all sorts of plans for the bike, but do concentrate on the basics of motorcycling and maintenance tasks. Keep it simple!

You're new at this, so consider this - how many employers would hire a newbie with no mechanical training to overhaul a motorcycle? Before you can do the fun stuff like bolt on new parts, you've got to learn all those boring things like how much pressure (torque) to use so the bolt doesn't fall out or snap off. The new guy would be cleaning grease and grime off the old parts and scraping rust. He'd watch what the master mechanic was doing and as he learned, would be given more to do until he could finally do the job on his own. We wouldn't want to find out later you were in a horrible crash because a wheel fell off or the drive shaft seized up after you'd put it back together. This is serious business and very real dangers to be avoided.

As a newbie, I'm guessing you have seriously underestimated what's involved being a mechanic. It's actually a very skilled activity involving physical and mental aspects along with a high level of responsibility - at least in anyone who takes it seriously. Good mechanics are generally very underpaid considering the skill, tools and equipment outlay, knowledge, and responsibility required.
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Wirespokes screwed with this post 10-31-2013 at 08:21 PM
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