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Old 11-09-2013, 04:42 PM   #61
xombiexplox OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
The kill switch will do that, no instrument/idiot lights, but the headlight will work. That circuit would be a good place to start.
Move the bars back and forth with the key on and see if anything changes, if not start moving the wireharness for the right side switch around and then follow it into the headlight. See if anything came unplugged off the circuit board or one of the fuses is blown.
Do you mean check the circuit board inside the headlight? Or inside the right side handlebar switch housing thing?

Thank you all for all the suggestions!!
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Old 11-09-2013, 04:51 PM   #62
Kai Ju
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Originally Posted by xombiexplox View Post
Do you mean check the circuit board inside the headlight? Or inside the right side handlebar switch housing thing?

Thank you all for all the suggestions!!
Shouldn't be the switch housing itself but could be. Usually clicking the switch on and off will clean a dirty contact but you've already done that. Like I said, wiggle the harness around with the key on and the kill switch in the on position and see if anything changes.
If it doesn't, open the headlight and look at the circuit board and fuses.
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:00 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
Shouldn't be the switch housing itself but could be. Usually clicking the switch on and off will clean a dirty contact but you've already done that. Like I said, wiggle the harness around with the key on and the kill switch in the on position and see if anything changes.
If it doesn't, open the headlight and look at the circuit board and fuses.
IT'S FIXED!!! It was a blown fuse, a little red bastard inside the headlamp looked like a chewed up cherry Now N' Later. Thanks for the tips everyone!!

Anybody have any clue how that happened and how to prevent it in the future?
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:26 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by xombiexplox View Post
IT'S FIXED!!! It was a blown fuse, a little red bastard inside the headlamp looked like a chewed up cherry Now N' Later. Thanks for the tips everyone!!

Anybody have any clue how that happened and how to prevent it in the future?
Might be time to check the wiring, looking for loose connections and dirty ground....make sure everything is plugged in the board. The fuse should not be red, but a white 8 amp fuse. The wrong fuse may have been the reason it blue. see what I did there
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Old 11-09-2013, 10:14 PM   #65
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Might be time to check the wiring, looking for loose connections and dirty ground....make sure everything is plugged in the board. The fuse should not be red, but a white 8 amp fuse. The wrong fuse may have been the reason it blue. see what I did there
Hahaha. Thank you, that's strange that I found a paper in the headlamp housing that said "red top, white bottom" and there was two fuses there so I just replace the red broken one :o

I'll look more into it though now thanks to everyone's help!
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Old 11-09-2013, 10:27 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by xombiexplox View Post
IT'S FIXED!!! It was a blown fuse, a little red bastard inside the headlamp looked like a chewed up cherry Now N' Later. Thanks for the tips everyone!!

Anybody have any clue how that happened and how to prevent it in the future?
Not to be a stick in the mud, but if the fuse was blown, then it's not fixed yet. It blew for a reason, and until you find that reason it'll likely happen again. At the most inopportune time at that.
The best way to find a short is with a short finder ( Really ? Yes)
The easy way to make a short finder is to find an old turn signal, attach a wire a couple of feet long to each side and finish it with a couple of alligator clips. Attach one clip each to both sides of the fuse holder and turn the key on. If you have a short, the light bulb will light up because one side is powered up (Hot side of the fuse ) while the other side is a path to ground, aka the short. The bulb takes the place of the fuse and it becomes the load in the shorted circuit.
If it doesn't light up, move things around until it does. It may only glow dimly to start with but that still indicates a short. Once you got it to that condition, unplug loads from that circuit until the bulb goes out. That will be your short to ground. Fix it, replace your short finder with the correct fuse and be on your way.
The set up I have here at home is an old sealed beam headlight with several feet of wire so I can set it anywhere. That way, when the short lights it up it illuminates the whole room, easy to tell that you're shorted.

Anyway, sorry about being long winded and good luck.
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Old 11-10-2013, 07:28 AM   #67
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Whoa! What a great idea! I hate searching for the little test light bulb out of the corner of my eye as I'm contorting. Off to the junkyard!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
Not to be a stick in the mud, but if the fuse was blown, then it's not fixed yet. It blew for a reason, and until you find that reason it'll likely happen again. At the most inopportune time at that.
The best way to find a short is with a short finder ( Really ? Yes)
The easy way to make a short finder is to find an old turn signal, attach a wire a couple of feet long to each side and finish it with a couple of alligator clips. Attach one clip each to both sides of the fuse holder and turn the key on. If you have a short, the light bulb will light up because one side is powered up (Hot side of the fuse ) while the other side is a path to ground, aka the short. The bulb takes the place of the fuse and it becomes the load in the shorted circuit.
If it doesn't light up, move things around until it does. It may only glow dimly to start with but that still indicates a short. Once you got it to that condition, unplug loads from that circuit until the bulb goes out. That will be your short to ground. Fix it, replace your short finder with the correct fuse and be on your way.
The set up I have here at home is an old sealed beam headlight with several feet of wire so I can set it anywhere. That way, when the short lights it up it illuminates the whole room, easy to tell that you're shorted.

Anyway, sorry about being long winded and good luck.
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Old 11-10-2013, 07:28 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by xombiexplox View Post
Hahaha. Thank you, that's strange that I found a paper in the headlamp housing that said "red top, white bottom" and there was two fuses there so I just replace the red broken one :o

I'll look more into it though now thanks to everyone's help!
Weird.....obviously there is a short and they assumed the 8amp was too small. Both should be white.
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Old 11-10-2013, 09:05 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by hardwaregrrl View Post
Whoa! What a great idea! I hate searching for the little test light bulb out of the corner of my eye as I'm contorting. Off to the junkyard!!!
+1
I've actually got a brand new sealed headlight for my jeep - maybe I'll just put it in the jeep now and use the older one it replaces...
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Old 11-10-2013, 09:17 AM   #70
Big Bamboo
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Maybe inmate BigBamboo is a good (local) resource for info?
Unfortunately, I'm on the Big Island, but feel free to PM me with any questions. Note: I sell new and used parts for these bikes on Craigslist, my contact info is in the ad.

Big Bamboo screwed with this post 11-10-2013 at 08:53 PM
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Old 11-10-2013, 09:27 AM   #71
hardwaregrrl
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Unfortunately, I'm on the Big Island, but feel free to PM me with any questions and I will send you my phone number so we don't have too do endless emails. Note: I sell new and used parts for these bikes on Craigslist.
What's the trip like over to her island? Good to know you're somewhat close by as I'm sure they are not a frequent sighting in your hood.
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Old 11-10-2013, 08:25 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by Kai Ju View Post
Not to be a stick in the mud, but if the fuse was blown, then it's not fixed yet. It blew for a reason, and until you find that reason it'll likely happen again. At the most inopportune time at that.
The best way to find a short is with a short finder ( Really ? Yes)
The easy way to make a short finder is to find an old turn signal, attach a wire a couple of feet long to each side and finish it with a couple of alligator clips. Attach one clip each to both sides of the fuse holder and turn the key on. If you have a short, the light bulb will light up because one side is powered up (Hot side of the fuse ) while the other side is a path to ground, aka the short. The bulb takes the place of the fuse and it becomes the load in the shorted circuit.
If it doesn't light up, move things around until it does. It may only glow dimly to start with but that still indicates a short. Once you got it to that condition, unplug loads from that circuit until the bulb goes out. That will be your short to ground. Fix it, replace your short finder with the correct fuse and be on your way.
The set up I have here at home is an old sealed beam headlight with several feet of wire so I can set it anywhere. That way, when the short lights it up it illuminates the whole room, easy to tell that you're shorted.

Anyway, sorry about being long winded and good luck.
Um...no.

If you put a bulb across your fuse holder (fuse out) it will light up any time the key is on because there is supposed to be power through the fuse. You can disconnect all sorts of things that are supposed to be getting power and active (like indicator bulbs, the alternator, etc.) and the bulb will go out. If the circuit is NOT switched by the ignition it will light up all the time. if the circuit is switched but lights up with the switch off so there is not supposed to be current flowing through the fuse, THEN you gotta problem.

I haven't looked at the wiring diagram for that bike but sumthin sounds funny. Wonder what Andy Dong would say?
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Old 11-10-2013, 10:22 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
Um...no.

If you put a bulb across your fuse holder (fuse out) it will light up any time the key is on because there is supposed to be power through the fuse. You can disconnect all sorts of things that are supposed to be getting power and active (like indicator bulbs, the alternator, etc.) and the bulb will go out. If the circuit is NOT switched by the ignition it will light up all the time. if the circuit is switched but lights up with the switch off so there is not supposed to be current flowing through the fuse, THEN you gotta problem.

I haven't looked at the wiring diagram for that bike but sumthin sounds funny. Wonder what Andy Dong would say?
Um...yes.

If you connect a load, such as a light bulb, across a fuse it will only light up if one side of the fuse is grounded, i.e. shorted. Under normal, non shorted, circumstances the light bulb will just conduct electricity because it is not part of a complete circuit. A basic circuit being a power source, (the battery), a load, (the light bulb), and ground, (back to the battery negative terminal). If there is a short to ground before the load it will cause sparks and mayhem. If the short is after the load it's merely a ground. Amuse yourself and measure voltage drop before the load, which will be whatever voltage your power source supplies, and then after the load, which should be just about zero since the load is using it up.

Here you'll find illustrations to go with the explanation: http://www.crookedriverwriter.com/in...ght-trick.html
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Old 11-11-2013, 12:05 AM   #74
Plaka
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Um...yes.

If you connect a load, such as a light bulb, across a fuse it will only light up if one side of the fuse is grounded, i.e. shorted. Under normal, non shorted, circumstances the light bulb will just conduct electricity because it is not part of a complete circuit. A basic circuit being a power source, (the battery), a load, (the light bulb), and ground, (back to the battery negative terminal). If there is a short to ground before the load it will cause sparks and mayhem. If the short is after the load it's merely a ground. Amuse yourself and measure voltage drop before the load, which will be whatever voltage your power source supplies, and then after the load, which should be just about zero since the load is using it up.

Here you'll find illustrations to go with the explanation: http://www.crookedriverwriter.com/in...ght-trick.html
Ummm...no.

If you connect a bulb across the empty fuse holder, it will light up only if one side is hot and the other grounded. Two sides hot or two sides grounded and it will not light up.

lets say your short is after the fuse. Turn the key on and you establish a number of circuits through the fuse to ground. You have to disconnect all of those to see if one more remains that shouldn't be there. If you know the drop of those loads (or the current), you can see if it's too high, indicating a short somewhere. (You know little about where with only two fuses.) Except you don't have that data and you already know there is an overload---the fuse blew. It may or may not be a short.

The bulb gives you a very crude reading. Use a meter and you can watch the voltage across the fuse but more importantly you can watch the current. Watching voltage you first have to run around and unplg everything that normally goes to ground, then start wiggling wires looking for the intermittant circuit. if you watch the amps, work in short stretches if its high so you don't cook wire (or work with an aux fuse in your probe) and then just wiggle wire looking for the current change. Either way you have to explore all the switched circuits.

In this situation I would explore a few other things before I assumed a short. Those fuses will go from a small overload that goes on too long. That can be anything from an oversized headlight to heated gear in Delaware.
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:00 AM   #75
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[QUOTE=Plaka;22752887]Ummm...no.

If you connect a bulb across the empty fuse holder, it will light up only if one side is hot and the other grounded. Two sides hot or two sides grounded and it will not light up.

My point exactly, and the fuse doesn't care which part of the circuit is grounded/shorted. So unplugging each part of that circuit will point you in the right direction because the bulb will go off when the short has been removed.
Everybody can get a light bulb and some wire while stuck out on the road, not everybody will have access to a meter or know how to use it properly.

My intent was to help this young lady find the cause for her fuse blowing, not to get into a pi$$ing contest with a fellow inmate. (Whose opinions I respect, even if I don't necessarily share them all the time). I'm done now, you have a nice day.
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