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Old 05-28-2014, 03:18 PM   #286
d_mob OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagespeed View Post
i may be way behind on this, but did you check your charging voltage when the bike dies? EFI requires a minimum charge to keep 'er running.

loving the RR, thanks!
I haven't been doing that (checking), but I don't think that's it. Thanks for the tip though, it's a good idea to check. However, I replaced the battery in Antigua, which was sort of recent, so I'm pretty certain it's good. Also, when the bike dies it has no issue firing back up over and over and over. I'd think if it was a voltage issue, firing her back up continually would be an issue, no?

I went by the BMW dealership today and had a pretty good experience. I was there from 10am - 3pm, but they got the bike in and we gave it a once over. They had wheel bearings in stock, so we changed out the front, which was shot. Also, the mechanic replaced one of my bulbs that has been gone since somewhere in C.A. He also tightened up the front assembly bracket which had loosened slightly. They washed it as well, which was well worth the time. I'd forgotten what it looked like with all the dirt gone!

Now for the frustrating part... There were no fault codes, which is the main reason I went to them. We pulled the fuel pump, and no issue there. No issue with fuel filter either. The mechanic cleaned the entire fuel pump assembly and reassembled everything. We then removed the fuel cap assembly and cleaned the entire thing as well, checking for vent blocks.

After all that, and throughout the remainder of today, it has run just fine. However, I'll fill it up with gas tomorrow and give it a good thrashing through Lima traffic (which is crazy as $hit I might add!) to see if I can replicate. If it does it again, and not to sound pessimistic but I think it will, it might be the charcoal canister. Everything else has been looked at that might be the culprit (in my limited knowledge). Tomorrow afternoon Sam and I plan to yank the charcoal can to open the lungs a bit more on the bike. Hopefully all this (reset EFI, swapped air filter, cleaned fuel pump/filter, checked and cleaned fuel cap assembly venting, removed charcoal can, etc) will remedy the issue!

Any other tips are VERY MUCH welcome! I would feel less than confident heading into Bolivia, into what will be the most isolated part of the journey by far, with the potential of being left on the side of the road. :(

As promised, I'll post my reaction to the dealership... I think they were fairly knowledgeable. They didn't know about a charcoal canister, which is understandable I guess since they don't have them here. They were genuinely concerned about the issue, and I have three business cards from all three guys I met there. They said that if there are ANY issues down the road, to give them a call and they'll go out of their way to get me sorted. Also, I've been invited to a rally/ride on Sunday up into the hills with a big group to watch an enduro race. I think I'll stick around until then to do that. Not only to ride with a fun group, but to give the bike more time to act up (or not) again. Long story short, reasonable pricing for use of the shop, diag computer, tasty coffee from a machine probably worth more than my bike, and plenty of eye candy (both female sales staff, and beautiful new BMW bikes - that new R Nine T is sick!!!). I'd give them a thumbs up. Then again, if you are more competent than me with mechanics, then you probably wouldn't need to! Good guys though, so I'm not too fussed about needing to hit up the shop.
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Old 05-28-2014, 03:21 PM   #287
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Originally Posted by theycallmetrinity View Post
Hey there Dave, what you feel is normal on long trips like this. But again this is why we do it, to get out of our comfort zone and experience new. In 2010 I backpacked around the globe for 6 months..I had similar thoughts you re having now. I felt alone and lonely sometimes in some far away land but in the same time I felt like I'm doing something for me for the first time. I also felt a sense of complete freedom meaning no schedules no appointments no meetings no bills to worry about which we are so programmed to do that when you re traveling you almost feel guilty about it. Looking back that 6 months were some of the most memorable time of my entire life and wish I ve done it sooner.

Besides you must go on otherwise what am I gonna read here to keep me inspired hehe
Fair enough, I'll quit being a biyatch and will continue on!

Thanks for the nice words. Def out of the comfort zone for sure. But loving every minute of it (well maybe not every minute, but most!)...

Glad you are enjoying the reading, and getting some inspiration for your next RR. Looking forward to it.

Chat soon,
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Old 05-29-2014, 12:50 PM   #288
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Thanks to this thread - http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=500968

And Sam...

The charcoal canister has been removed. Plug and air filter have been secured, and the bike seems to be doing just fine. Picked up some injector cleaner, and should be all set to call it a day and ride this beast to destinations south.

Hopefully!
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Old 05-30-2014, 11:19 AM   #289
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d_mob,

Small world. The young American lady you met a week or so ago is a workout buddy of mine at a gym in Huntsville, AL. Go figure. She's a great gal who I'd chase to the ends of the Earth if I was (A LOT) younger and not (very happily) married. I'll be catching up on your thread over the next couple of days. I hope to start my own someday and will either take my R100GS or, like everyone else who has done this says, just take a KLR. But the GS is so sexy!!!

Stay safe,

John
Huntsville, AL
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Old 05-30-2014, 04:05 PM   #290
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d_mob,

Small world. The young American lady you met a week or so ago is a workout buddy of mine at a gym in Huntsville, AL. Go figure. She's a great gal who I'd chase to the ends of the Earth if I was (A LOT) younger and not (very happily) married. I'll be catching up on your thread over the next couple of days. I hope to start my own someday and will either take my R100GS or, like everyone else who has done this says, just take a KLR. But the GS is so sexy!!!

Stay safe,

John
Huntsville, AL
Yeah man... Small world. Madeleine (I'm assuming that's who you are talking about) is great. We met on the train up to Machu Picchu then hung out a bit in Cusco. Being from Georgia originally, I guess southern accents are drawn to one another. :)

Regarding the R vs KLR... I was just talking to several people about this over the past few days. Bikes are like women, the more attractive and sexy, the more maintenance. That said, I'd love a KLR, but I'm a sucker for a hottie (hence the F8). Then again, ask me in a few days if this fuel pump keeps acting up and I may be ready to trade her in for an ugly old reliable beast!

Keep on truckin', tell Madeleine I said hello, and I look forward to reading your ride report soon.

~ D
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Old 06-02-2014, 01:04 PM   #291
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Lima... That's a Wrap!!!

Monday, June 2nd, 2014


_____________________



After a week in Lima it's time to ride on. While I've enjoyed it here, I'm ready to roll...

It seems as if it was split into two parts. The first half was spent in Miraflores with my buddy Sam. We were able to explore a fair amount of the city, enjoyed our time together, and were able to get my bike dialed and ready to roll (end culprit for cutting out/stalling issue ended up being a clogged charcoal canister, which was removed after 20mins of wrenching). The second half I moved over to Barranco for a bit more flavor, and have really enjoyed the artsy and culture rich neighborhood.



One of the highlights of my time here came yesterday. Julio from Commercial Gildemeister BMW Motorrad invited me to join the BMW club for a nice breakfast and chat in the morning at the shop, then a very spirited group ride to Pachacamac to watch and enjoy some enduro racing and a concert. It's funny, sometimes when you join a 'BMW adventure group' for a ride, it turns out to be a slow paced, non-dirt, highway crawl to a bar to chat bikes, with not much actual riding, much less 'adventure'. I was pleasantly surprised when Julio and the boys took off down some semi-rough rocky dirt roads and railed it all the way to Pachacamac. Julio is a dirt rider at heart, and was ripping the demo F8 sideways, and jumping over berms essentially the whole way. I opened up the throttle on my bike and could barely keep up. It was an awesome day filled with good riding, great people, fun racing, and solid networking (even met a few people that may be interested in buying my bike eventually). Julio, if you read this thanks for the invite and the hospitality!



I also met a girl named Carmen here in Lima. She's really nice, funny, successful, and full of zest. We've had some great conversations along the way about travel, relationships, and life. Carmen has been showing me around the city, which has been really nice. Having a beautiful personal tour guide in a city the size of Lima is a very, very welcome change. We've checked out some nightlife, restaurants, and sights. Not to mention she has a nice car, so I feel like a VIP being chauffeured around town. Thanks C! I owe you. If I find my way back to Denver, I'll show you around my town as well... ;)



This city is amazing... After riding through the Andes and countryside of Peru, seeing indigenous families living in grass huts at 16k+ feet, poverty in fishing villages, and thousands of bamboo huts in the desert, the evident wealth in parts of Lima is a shock to the system. Last night I met Carmen at Larcomar, which is a high end mall overlooking the ocean. As I strolled around waiting for her to arrive (yeah go figure, a Peruvian being late) I couldn't believe I was in the same country. The mall is nicer than most in the States. Equipped with Starbucks, designer clothing stores, and high end bars/restaurants, the candy coated Larcomar has everything a Lima socialite needs to feel pampered and whisked away from the real Lima/Peru. I will say, my $4 Juan Valdez coffee was quite nice! Nothing wrong with the mall, or the people that frequent it, I just continue to be shocked by the contrast that Peru provides. One minute walking down Angamos popping in autorepuestos looking for an air filter and drinking incredibly cheap maca (a grain similar to quinoa served warm / like a tasty oatmeal drink), the next having a coffee in a super chic, polished BMW dealership in the wealthy neighborhood of La Molina. That's been my experience... Peru, the land of incredible disparity.



Another fun highlight from my time here came when Sam was dropping off the rental bike. He picked it up from Toby at Around the Block Moto Adventures in Huanuco. However, since he was flying out of Lima, he dropped it off at one of Toby's friends houses. When we pulled up, Neil (aka Bluebull on ADVrider) opened his garage and it was full of motorbikes. He invited us in and we chatted bikes and racing over a couple of beers. He and his wife are both great, and it was really neat getting a rundown of Dakar and various other rally races from an actual competitor/racer. Not to mention looking over his fleet of bikes, including his current Rally Raid race bike. I'm a road racer at heart, but being here in Peru riding actual segments of Dakar have piqued my interest much more in off road racing. In fact, I just downloaded the Erzberg Rodeo from this weekend and plan to watch it over a beer later.



Tomorrow I'll wake up and head out early. I want to get to Paracas in time to explore the park, and to see if there is a place to set up my tent for the night. I've heard several people tell me that the best camping is very isolated, but that it can be dangerous as well. I'll have to scope it out for myself. If so, I'll probably continue south after exploring the dunes/coast, and will spend a night in Nazca. After that, it's a looooong ride/day to Arequipa (as shown on route map above) where I'll spend a couple of days, one of which I'll use to explore Colca Canyon. After all that, I'll hit Puno, Titicaca, and will cross into Bolivia. Can't. Freaking. Wait... I'm ready to get back on the bike and explore!



I think that's it for now. I feel bipolar in my postings. The last couple were a bit melancholic, but I couldn't be happier as I write this. The bike is back to normal, I have some amazing riding ahead, and I had an incredible conversation with Nina this morning that lifted my spirits. Life is good. Life on two wheels is amazing! Looking forward to experiencing and sharing more soon...

'Dawn is coming, open your eyes',

~ D












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Old 06-03-2014, 01:36 PM   #292
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Hey d_mob! Great update!

Are you still using the GPS much? Leaving for SA (start in Colombia) and thinking the pros and cons of a GPS.

i
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:52 PM   #293
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Hey d_mob! Great update!

Are you still using the GPS much? Leaving for SA (start in Colombia) and thinking the pros and cons of a GPS.

i
I love the GPS, when it works! Used BiciMapas in Mexico and Central America and it worked fantastically. Here, not so much. Tried Garmin SA, which is absolutely worthless. Then started using OSM, which is decent, at best. Been relying more and more on Google Maps on the phone, which works well, alongside paper maps.

To answer your question, it is really nice to have. I would bring one for sure if I was doing another trip like this.

Also, don't be afraid to ask for directions along the way. But, be prepared to ask a metric $hit load of people, and take the running average. The other day I asked a guy, "how far to Ayacucho?" He said "two hours". Then I said, "ok from Ayacucho to Abancay?". He replied, "another two hours"... Then I said, "ok and the whole trip?" to which he replied... "six hours". How the hell does that work? :)
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:23 PM   #294
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Originally Posted by d_mob View Post
..The other day I asked a guy, "how far to Ayacucho?" He said "two hours". Then I said, "ok from Ayacucho to Abancay?". He replied, "another two hours"... Then I said, "ok and the whole trip?" to which he replied... "six hours". How the hell does that work? :)
you obviously left out the siesta gringo.
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Old 06-07-2014, 12:27 PM   #295
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Long Lonely Roads... Lima, Nazca, Arequipa



Saturday, June 7, 2014
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Since the last post, I got stuck in Lima for a few days (various reasons), then took the long and amazing road to Nazca (via Reserva Nacional de Paracas), and then woke up yesterday for the looooong, grey, misty road south along the coast and then inland to Arequipa.



The bike is still running like a top, which is great leading into Bolivia, and parts south. I still laugh that all the trouble was caused by a factory installed plastic charcoal canister. And all the work to repair it, before just yanking that POS. But my mechanic skills aren't the best, so it was probably good for me to learn everything anyway (fuel filter/pump assembly, air filter, EFI reset, etc).



The last few days in Lima were great. I was able to explore a bit more with my tour guide Carmen, and get caught up on rest. I felt the onset of a cold, so it was probably best to stay stationary for a bit. Also rediscovered the magic powers of garlic, ginger, lemon, honey tea. Seriously, that gnarly concoction could wake the dead I think.



The day before yesterday I took the journey down to Paracas and rode through the park for several hours. Sam and I had passed through Paracas, but missed the turn off for the reserve. I'm REALLY glad I decided to circle back. Anyone on a bike not traveling through would be missing an amazing place. Filled with surreal, ethereal, beautiful scenery. They tell you to stay on the roads (more like sandy paths), but everyone seems to disobey that guideline. I ended up riding all around, up and down dunes, making it my personal Dakar-style playground. I found myself smiling in the helmet on many occasions. Before I knew it, I needed to get going down to Nazca, so pointed the front wheel in that direction and pressed on. The remainder of the ride was fast paced on sealed highway. Equally beautiful though IMO. Something about cresting a ridge in the middle of the desert seeing a road, straight as an arrow ahead of you, that seemingly goes on forever.



Yesterday morning I woke up at Nazca Trails Hotel (awesome place, parking, price, and owner) and geared up for the long ride to Arequipa. The highway down the coast was long, lonely, grey, and full of mist that fogged my visor for hours. Don't get me wrong, the scenery was beautiful in places, but yesterday was a bit of a slog. I pressed on. It finally cleared and I arrived in Arequipa around 4pm. I'm staying at Arequipay Backpackers Hostel, which is clean, decently priced, and quiet... Quiet! Why is that important? Well, the past few days in Lima I stayed at The Point Hostel, which was filled to the brim with young, incredibly annoying backpackers that had one purpose, to party their collective titties off! The staff was nice enough, but I needed to get out of that place. A party is one thing, but people scoring Valium from staff, raunchy sex in the dorms (yeah), people smoking day and night in the courtyard from repurposed Inca Cola bongs, etc makes for a tough stay. Not to mention the group of Israeli military guys on break that were able to somehow stay awake 24/7, and be the loudest/rudest/messiest group of guys I've ever witnessed. Anyway, if you want a massive party, stay at The Point (any of them - they have 5). If you are old and grumpy like me, avoid it.



Today I'm getting caught up on much needed activities (i.e. banking, laundry, e-mail, etc). I met a nice Arequipeña chica named Diana. She has offered to show me around the city, and also works in the travel industry, so can hook up route planning advice. Tomorrow I hop on the bike to shoot over to Puno, on the shores of Titicaca for one night. Then I'll make the trek over/into Bolivia and will stay a night in Copacabana. That will mark ~15k miles (24k+km), and country number 12 after being on the road for almost 7 months! After that, it's down to La Paz where I'll spend a couple of nights. I've found places to camp in both Copacabana (Lakeside Bush Camp) and La Paz (Hotel Oberland), which I'll probably take advantage of. After that I'll probably follow the traditional route snaking over and then down through Yungas region (Death Road, etc), then into Sucre, Potosi, Uyuni, etc.



Sorry this post is a bit all over the place. Like the ride the past few days (maintenance miles), this is a bit of a maintenance post. Needed to get caught up...

Anyway, hope everyone is well. Chat soon...

~ D



PS... For those reading this who ride, I've been in touch with Jerry from Compass Expeditions, and they are looking to find people to help relocate a group of BMW F7's from La Paz, Bolivia to Pucon, Chile in September. If interested, get in touch with me (david.p.mobley@gmail.com) and I'll pass you along. Would be a great opportunity to participate in your own adventure, on a brand new bike, at a cut rate.



PPS... I wanted to give a shout out to my new buddy Laszlo S. from LA. I don't consider myself an inspiration by any means, but he has been keeping up with my journey, and apparently, according to him, it has inspired him enough to finally undertake his own. He just picked up a beautiful yellow KLR, and will set off soon. Good on ya mate... I look forward to keeping up with your blog once I'm done, and settled back in the 'real world'. Keep the dream alive, and the rubber side down! ;)





















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Old 06-10-2014, 12:09 PM   #296
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Compass Expeditions

More details...
BMW F7 - that's a cage! Still, would be fun.
What part would I have to pay for - what would Compass cover? Also, what's the timeline? Do you have good contact info?
Definitely interested.
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Old 06-11-2014, 05:23 AM   #297
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Originally Posted by Vin View Post
More details...
BMW F7 - that's a cage! Still, would be fun.
What part would I have to pay for - what would Compass cover? Also, what's the timeline? Do you have good contact info?
Definitely interested.
The 8 is apparently too tall for some of their clients, so going with the 7... Seems a best of both world's scenario to me. Lighter than the 8, slightly more power than the 6?

Anyway, I'm planning to hop offline during my time in Bolivia (just got here yesterday - need a 'tech break'). That said, probably best if you reach out to the Compass folks directly. Please tell em' I sent ya. Thanks...

Jerry@CompassExpeditions.com
CC - Sayda@CompassExpeditions.com

Best of luck. I know that would be a phenomenal trip, at a cut rate cost. I'd be down to extend my trip if I didn't need to go 'get a life!'. :)
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Old 06-11-2014, 05:28 AM   #298
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7 Months, 12 Countries, 15k+ Miles | Greetings From Bolivia...


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Tuesday, June 10th, 2014
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So yeah, here we are... In Bolivia! 7 months after leaving home, which has seen me cross through 12 countries and cover well over 15,000 miles. A few more stats off the top of my head for ya...

+ 3 - Heidenau K60 rear tires (2 fronts)
+ 4 - Oil/filter changes (1 air filter)
+ 1 - Faulty battery replacement
+ 1 - Chain/sprocket set replacement
+ 1 - Replacement fork seal pair
+ 1 - Replacement front low beam bulb
+ 1 - Set front/rear brake pads
+ 1 - Charcoal cannister removed
+ 1 - Bent rear rim repaired
+ 2 - Sets of wheel bearings (front/
+ 2 - Suicidal birds killed
+ 10 - Minor tip overs / get offs
+ 1 - Major crash in Colombia
+ Craziest drivers - Lima, Peru
+ Craziest dogs - All of em!
+ 0 - Cases of food/water poisoning
+ 22 - Nights camped
+ 12 - Nights Couchsurfed
+ 1 - Injury (from a bed slat falling on my little toe)
+ 0 - Robberies, fights, altercations, 'people' issues, etc worth noting
+ Favorite country - Probably Mexico, but highlights from all
+ Least favorite - Peru, but also best riding by far (least fave for other reasons)
+ Most beautiful women - Tie between Mexico and Colombia
+ Least beautiful women - Peru (uhhh... just figured out why it's my least favorite!)
+ Countless - Number of new friends met along the way, and cervezas consumed
+ Favorite food - Tie between molé tamales in Oaxaca and Aji de Gallina in Peru
+ $65-$70 - Daily average (including big ticket items / travel, shipping, repair, girls, etc)
+ $50'ish - Daily average with just lodging, food, fuel, etc
+ Favorite ride - Too many in Peru, but Huaraz to Huanuco was spectacular



Let me do the rest of this post backwards... I just arrived in La Paz, and have set up my tent for two nights at Hotel Oberland. This is a Swiss high'ish end hotel, but the owner apparently loves overland travel, hence the name. So much so, he has set up a walled section behind the hotel for vehicles and camping. For approx $5USD per night, you get secure parking, wifi, hot showers, and access to all the amenities of the hotel. Not exactly roughing it, but being in the tent is always nice, and it saves some cash in an otherwise expensive city (by Bolivian standards). I'll be here for two nights.



The rides the past two days were great! Yesterday I blasted from Arequipa to Puno, which provided spectacular scenery, a decently close, ground-shaking volcano eruption, and a few death bridges that were very high on the pucker factor. What was supposed to be a laid back day, turned into one of the more memorable. This morning I woke up early in Puno after a nice night at Hotel Florida (local spot w/ private room and garage parking for $10USD). I was on the road by 8am. The first third of the ride was decent, but very cold. I made it to the border around 9:30. I'd heard good things about the border at Yunguyo/Copacabana and it did NOT disappoint. I was in and out (both sides) in less than 25 minutes. Half of that was spent sourcing necessary copies, and taking a few thumbs up pics with the Peruvian Nat'l Police on site. PS... I had nothing but great experiences with police in Peru. Lucky? Not sure, but figured I'd give em' a shout out. I didn't even have SOAT, oops! Seems a smile and pretty bike have gotten me out of a few jams.



After the border, the second third of the ride exiting Copacabana was spectacular. I got hit for 10 Bolivian Pesos by a nat'l policeman that I'm fairly certain was a small 'bribe', but it didn't bother me. After his makeshift roadblock, the road opened up with clean sweepers, stunning views of Titi, and then a nice ferry ride (Titis and ferrys, sounds like a weekend in San Fran!). The other side of the lake was more of the same until the road leveled off and took me towards La Paz. As I got closer to the city I was shocked to see massive snow covered mountains off to my left (north). Not sure which ones they were exactly, but were beautiful. However, my emotions were blended as I could see the brewings of a storm ahead. I rolled the throttle entirely open as I only had 35 miles to La Paz according to my GPS, and I wanted to avoid the storm as much as possible...



...Then, 17 miles before the city I ran into a major traffic jam. I thought to myself, "certainly this is temporary, La Paz can't be 17 miles wide!"... I was wrong. That was the beginning of the craziest, maddest, most insane 17 miles of my adventure so far. Seriously, I can't even begin to explain the craziness that is La Paz. There are literally 3ft wide death holes in the middle of the road, everywhere. There are massive boulders laying around from previous protests, like rock land mines waiting to ruin your entire trip/life. The traffic is indescribable! There are people darting in/out of traffic from every angle, like a retarded Bolivian version of Frogger. There are mangy looking dogs striking from all directions. Since I entered in the NW, and Oberland is in the SE, I needed to cover the entirety of the city. Now if that wasn't enough, the traffic slowed me enough for the storm to catch up. As I'm descending into the smog bowl that is downtown La Paz, it starts thundering, raining, then hail. Hail! Anyway, needless to say it was quite an adventure making my way slowly to Oberland. Funny thing is, the minute I pulled up to the door, the hail stopped, the clouds cleared, and the sun was shining brightly. The girl inside asked why I was so wet and dirty. I just laughed and told her I need to set up camp. I don't care how bad this sounds, La Paz is a total $hit hole! I don't have the patience to uncover the beauty here, and am not sure I believe those who have told me it exists.



Tomorrow I'll spend the majority of the day route planning as I'm headed to Yungas region after this for awhile, then south from there. The sight of massive heavily snow covered mountains just before entering La Paz didn't exactly get me excited for the cold, but there are roads and areas that I simply can't miss. It looks as I'll start acclimatizing sooner than later, as it's supposed to be below freezing the next two nights, which will make for a couple of chilly nights in the tent. If I have add'l time, I'll probably drop by Nosiglia, which is a semi-famous shop in the ADV scene for a few spares, some chain lube, and possibly some clear dirt bike goggles to compliment the smoke visor on my Arai XD4.



I think that's it for now. I'm going for a warm shower, and will start layering up for the chilly night. It's been a long two days and I'm ready for some rest.

Finally, I've decided that Bolivia will be sans communication for me. I'll check email on occasion, but won't be updating the blog and/or checking Facebook, etc. I'll have my SPOT GPS communicator alongside, so will be safe, just need a break from everything, and think it sounds like a nice challenge to shut down for awhile, something I've never done. I'll keep detailed notes throughout Bolivia and will post a series of updates, pics, and videos once I emerge... Until then,

~ D



PS... If you haven't already, I'd highly recommend getting on board with The Minimalists. Their recent book (Everything That Remains), their site, and frequent e-mails are great. Here is an update that was in my inbox this morning. It was a great reminder that, without paring down my possessions to next to nothing, I personally wouldn't have been able to undergo the adventure that I'm currently experiencing, which of course has provided so much more. Check it out if you want to learn more about minimalism, or just need some inspiration to offload your crap.

On a side note, as I was sleeping in my tent last night in freezing La Paz temps, I'd be lying if I didn't miss a warm house/bed. :)



"At first glance, people might think the point of minimalism is just to get rid of material possessions. Eliminating. Jettisoning. Extracting. Detaching. Decluttering. Letting go. But that's a mistake.

True, removing the excess is an important part of the recipe. But it's just one ingredient. If we're concerned solely with the stuff, though, then we're missing the larger point.

Minimalists don't focus on having less, less, less. Rather, we focus on making room for more: more time, more passion, more experiences, more growth and contribution and contentment. More freedom. It just so happens that clearing the clutter from life's path helps us make that room.

Minimalism is the thing that gets us past the things so we can make room for life's important things - which aren't things at all."













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Old 06-11-2014, 06:12 AM   #299
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PS... One add'l update.

I mentioned my current setup at Oberland. I just sat down with Walter (the owner) over breakfast, and he gave me some incredible route planning advice. Here I was zooming in and out on Google Maps, comparing potential routes to tour company routes, and stressing. Walter comes over and lays out some great options for me. So again, if you need a place to rest, just outside of the bustle of La Paz, with other hip overland travelers, and a great owner... Look no further. Had to give them a shout out. Plus, it's nestled in the Valley of the Moon, which is stellar.
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Old 06-13-2014, 10:25 PM   #300
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Fantastic

Finally got a chance to get caught up on your posts, absolutely inspirational! Between the photography, the stories, the pictures of babes and your philosophical take on things, this easily my favorite RR so far. Thanks for putting in the work to bring us along.
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