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Old 11-10-2013, 04:29 PM   #16
dimikk OP
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Didn't know the thing about disconnecting the battery every time when take the front cover off. Luckily i had the battery off the bike.

Took the Top cover off, the top of the engine seems dry and clean:


the turkey valve disc looks good too, no cracks. Lost the spring though when was removing the valve disc, just flew in the air and bye bye..

When i was changing the air filter i remember a little oil on the rubber part of it.. I guess it came from the turkey valve. Don't look like a good spot for the engine to spill the extra oil. Or may be a good spot if you think about it as it re-oils the air filter regularly :) Idk

Too late, Plaka, I already cleaned the sleve with acetone. Hope it didn't melt the insulation..



The bike's year is 1975 (december)
I threw the K&N's box away, so no return... Probably will buy a new filter along with the spring for the turkey valve and gaskets/seals.

Didn't get to look at the pushrod, my daughter wanted a lot more attention today than usually. So I will check it tomorrow after work.

Now, I am really confused with the spark plug/wires situation.
I have 2 types of plugs in the head - NGK BP6ES on top and Champion P8Y on the bottom, non-resistor type. Plug wires don't say on them anything except "TAYLOR SPIRO 8mm SILICONE MADE IN USA". All of them show resistance between 0.55 and 0.60 ohm.
Also the bike came with an old used Bosch Super W6DC plug laying in the toolbox, it has "R0" marking on it. Couldn't find anything about it. Does that mean Resistor plug or Resistance=0..
Anyway... Plaka, what's the deal with the resistance? Should it be one of the two - resistor wires/non-resistor plugs or non-resistor wires/resistor plugs? Is anything different on double plugged bikes? Could you attach a link to read something if you don't mind. Appreciate everybody's help, guys!!!
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Old 11-10-2013, 04:53 PM   #17
disston
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They do not sell the Turkey valve springs separate. They don't even sell the Turkey valve anymore. If you can't find the spring you will have to buy the new Reed type valve. Then the problem gets to be getting the old Turkey valve out. Fashion a puller of some kind. Heat helps. It is really in there.

Everything does look clean around the breather.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:25 PM   #18
Plaka
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Originally Posted by dimikk View Post
Didn't know the thing about disconnecting the battery every time when take the front cover off. Luckily i had the battery off the bike.

Took the Top cover off, the top of the engine seems dry and clean:


the turkey valve disc looks good too, no cracks. Lost the spring though when was removing the valve disc, just flew in the air and bye bye..

When i was changing the air filter i remember a little oil on the rubber part of it.. I guess it came from the turkey valve. Don't look like a good spot for the engine to spill the extra oil. Or may be a good spot if you think about it as it re-oils the air filter regularly :) Idk

Too late, Plaka, I already cleaned the sleve with acetone. Hope it didn't melt the insulation..



The bike's year is 1975 (december)
I threw the K&N's box away, so no return... Probably will buy a new filter along with the spring for the turkey valve and gaskets/seals.

Didn't get to look at the pushrod, my daughter wanted a lot more attention today than usually. So I will check it tomorrow after work.

Now, I am really confused with the spark plug/wires situation.
I have 2 types of plugs in the head - NGK BP6ES on top and Champion P8Y on the bottom, non-resistor type. Plug wires don't say on them anything except "TAYLOR SPIRO 8mm SILICONE MADE IN USA". All of them show resistance between 0.55 and 0.60 ohm.
Also the bike came with an old used Bosch Super W6DC plug laying in the toolbox, it has "R0" marking on it. Couldn't find anything about it. Does that mean Resistor plug or Resistance=0..
Anyway... Plaka, what's the deal with the resistance? Should it be one of the two - resistor wires/non-resistor plugs or non-resistor wires/resistor plugs? Is anything different on double plugged bikes? Could you attach a link to read something if you don't mind. Appreciate everybody's help, guys!!!
If it melted it you would see it on the exposed parts. Sure didn't do it any good. The ONLY thing you use acetone on is cleaning metal before gasketing, and then don't use it there either, use technical alcohol. The shit is both too aggressive and too toxic--and walks right throuogh your skin. Your liver can actually produce the stuff, and does. It shows in your urine. Not an overly healthy situation. mineral spirits is both bad to breathe and on your skin. But it takes a lot more exposure to do brain damage (and I have seen such damage in printers who have cleaned plates with it their whole lives).

If it looks good, shows no symptoms of a problem, and you screw with it, you get to pay tuition---again and again until you learn better. if someone tell you to replace your advance springs, make damn sure you need to. They are tiny.

If you read Snowbum on the resistance issue, he is RABID on only using resistance caps and non-resistor plugs. But try to find out why. All he can come up with is some limp horseshit about buying the wrong plugs. he should know better but it's one of his peculiarities.

You want about 5k ohms of resistance in the secondaries. This gives you some EMF suppression and a longer spark duration. The electronics like that EMF suppression. You can go with it in the plugs OR the caps. Never both. I use strait copper core silicone jacket wires, non-resistor silicone caps and resistor plugs. Others use strait copper core wires, resistor caps (NGK caps are popular) and non-resitor plugs.

My motor is dual plugged with 14mm standard reach (3/4") upper plugs and 12 mm short reach (1/2") lower plugs. (I think it's a 5/8 spark plug socket for the lower. There are 3 basic sizes and I have all three for one thing or another. I think the 18mm tube socket in the kit fits but you may have to file it a tad. Don't remember which number is which. Easy for you to sort out). I like the resistor plugs because I have a lot more plugs to choose from. The non-resistor plugs are a dying breed. When it comes to that 12mm short reach lower, there are fewer of anything yet.

I walked into the local Carquest with a list of what pugs would work and they handed me a set of NGKs.

It is common to have the lower plugs a heat range hotter than the upper. The lower plugs foul more. But I found on a fresh rebuild I still needed the lowers one hotter. i think the heat range of the 12mm short reach plug, by the numbers, is not the same as the 14mm standard reach upper, by the numbers.

At any rate, I would stay with whatever heat range you found in the motor, for the time being.

You can't get the plug thread diameter wrong, the plug won't install.

You can get the reach wrong. If the lower takes a short reach plug and you install a long reach, it could hit something inside the chamber. There are different ways of machining for that lower plug. match the reach of what you took out.

You can get the heat range wrong. match what you took out.

The Bosch W6DC is a standard, non-resistor OEM plug. Save it and deal it off on ebay someday as a collectors item.

You always use metal core wires, never wrapped carbon or "carbon core". I like the non-resistor caps because they crimp/solder on the wires. The wires flap in the wind and that joint takes a beating. The crimp/ solder joint last forever (100k+ miles) and needs nothing, ever, The screw on joint is subject to corrosion and can work loose. You are wise to take apart and trim 1/4" off the end of the wire every year or two to give the screw a fresh bite. And check and clean any corrosion. The wires I build for myself are bullet proof and a fraction of the cost of store bought (I buy the wire bulk and the caps as discrete components). other people have a problem and get to checking their wires. Not uncommon to find a bad one. I got a problem I know from the beginning the wires themselves are fine.

I have some wires like you have. The caps are distinctive, that's how I spotted them. Came off the most fucked up 4 plug rig I have ever seen. Truly something special. The machining is so bad it went through the pushrod tube bores which are patched with PC7 and bits of sheet metal (which leaks). The guy screwed up with the wires too.


Avoid fancy plugs. Some of them are very long lived. For the cost you can buy plain jane and change them. None offer a performance advantage, although they do keep a lot of marketing wonks busy churning out hype.

In some Lycoming and other aircraft engine specs multi-electrode plugs are used. Don't go there.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:28 PM   #19
Plaka
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Originally Posted by disston View Post
They do not sell the Turkey valve springs separate. They don't even sell the Turkey valve anymore. If you can't find the spring you will have to buy the new Reed type valve. Then the problem gets to be getting the old Turkey valve out. Fashion a puller of some kind. Heat helps. It is really in there.

Everything does look clean around the breather.
Good thing he took it all apart to "check" it huh?...even with no leaking in evidence and no gobbling to indicate something broken.

$40.72 + shipping from Max for a new valve + making a puller.
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Old 11-10-2013, 09:40 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
Wiring looks OK. Get the green corrosion off the connections. Dust the wire in talcum powder repeatedly to kill the sticky and put it back. It's a fiberglass sleeve. I got a couple around, it's impregnated with something. Use citrus hand cleaner on your hands and maybe try it on the block. Other wise mineral spirits on the block. No solvent on the wire.

The crankcase breather is at the rear of the block. Don't mess with it unless it's broken. The hose might leak, the actual breather cap is gasketed down and rarely does. The thing can break. Makes a distinctive sound and isn't a "stopper". Newer bikes have a different setup with a hose at the front of the block and the breather in the same location at the rear. Has very little oil in it.

Return the K&N. Act indignant and tell them you tried it but it didn't fit! (A common complaint.). They filter very poorly and flow more. So you get a lot of grit fed to your cylinder walls which then ends up in your oil. oil filters clog faster, more wear, shorter oil change intervals. The throttle opening on your CV carbs is controlled by the vacuum in the carb venturi, not by the butterfly connected to your right wrist. You open the butterfly, vacuum changes and the diaphragm opens and closes the throttle slide. More flow = less vacuum = less slide opening for what you are doing at the bar. So no benefit. The paper filters are pretty cheap and last long.

Slide carbs have the slide directly connected to your wrist.

The leaves look innocent lying there. They are not lying there with the motor running. You can fab a new screen out of 1/8" mesh (no finer) hardware cloth. Just wedges in the vertical opening of the rubber intake like the original. This time of year you get some leaves anyway. Clean every so often.

When replacing the air cleaner cover, put the left on (you are correct to not remove the right one!), put the bolt in, Slide two finger in the right side carb opening and guide the tip of the bolt into place.

Slight scuffing is normal on pushrods, all four of them, in the same place.


For me, oil weep = gets dirty. Oil leak = washes the dirt off.
Just in case any other readers are interested in keeping it real: The earlier flapper type crankcase breather making a turkey gobbler noise most always has nothing to do with the valve being broken. They most often make that noise in perfect shape. Even the later reed valve type will sometimes but that is another story. They don't make noise nearly as often as the earlier type valve.

I service a LOT of airheads working on them professionally. I see the amount of dirt and grit the stock paper filters let by ALL the time in airbox snorkels and square airboxes. Despite a lot of poorly executed idiotnet tests to the contrary, K+N's filter much better than the stock paper filters. I wouldn't run the stock paper filters on my own bike. K+N's flow more? I don't care. What's important to me is that they filter SO much better. Plaka is getting his filters mixed up. It's the K+N filters for the SQUARE airboxes that don't fit right out of the box. I modify them to fit correctly and use them anyway because they filter SO much better than the stock paper filters. Just the cost of the K+N filters themselves compared to the stock paper filters also happens to be cheaper in the long run as well. Win/win! Saying that more flow is no benefit for CV carbs is patently not right. Nothing about that makes ANY sense! Plaka is completely misinforming the whole point and the how and why of CV carbs. Besides, K+N's don't flow differently enough to ever warrant any jetting changes in my experience of installing them in quite a few airheads. At least in the stock airboxes.

Guide the airbox screw into place with your fingers? Why do that blindly when you can bend over and look at the end of the screw through the carb opening and see where you are putting it with your own eyes. There is no trick to that. A little common sense is a big help when wrenching! I can't counter all the things I am reading in this thread that make no sense to me but . . . . Lycoming and other aircraft engines???? ALL aircraft plugs have multiple electrodes. It's so that if a ball of lead gets stuck in between one electrode the other one will still fire. Aviation fuel has lead in it. It use to have a LOT more in it than it does nowadays but . . . . Besides, lots of other plugs BMW recommends for other model BMW motorcycles are multiple electrode spark plugs. In bikes and cars? I think they use them for longevity.

supershaft screwed with this post 11-10-2013 at 10:05 PM
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Old 11-11-2013, 05:27 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by supershaft View Post

Guide the airbox screw into place with your fingers? Why do that blindly when you can bend over and look at the end of the screw through the carb opening and see where you are putting it with your own eyes.
I'll admit, up until my last airbox disassembly I used to "guide it in" as I had difficulties getting it to thread. I felt a moron when I realised I could just look.
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:30 AM   #22
supershaft
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I'll admit, up until my last airbox disassembly I used to "guide it in" as I had difficulties getting it to thread. I felt a moron when I realised I could just look.
The difference being that you are not advising people to do it the moronic way and at the same time trying to come off like you know what you are talking about! After all, we can all read snobum. That is if you don't know any better.
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Old 11-11-2013, 03:20 PM   #23
dimikk OP
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Crap






so replacing the tube definetily. But the push rod surprisingly straight. Well, may be a tiny bit. Worth spending another $50?
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Old 11-11-2013, 03:47 PM   #24
supershaft
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Originally Posted by dimikk View Post





so replacing the tube definetily. But the push rod surprisingly straight. Well, may be a tiny bit. Worth spending another $50?
Did you spin the pushrod while it was in place in the engine like I suggested earlier? I suspect if you did you could see that the pushrod is bent? It's a real good place to check for straightness versus pulling it and rolling it on some good glass. If it is bent at all, get a replacement.

Scuff marks are normal but not on that end of the pushrod. The other end that runs closest to the head often gets scuffed buy the end of the pushrod tube in the clylinder and/or the beginning of the pushrod tube in the head. The head gasket will do it too if they are put in backwards!

supershaft screwed with this post 11-11-2013 at 03:57 PM
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Old 11-11-2013, 04:01 PM   #25
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The difference being that you are not advising people to do it the moronic way and at the same time trying to come off like you know what you are talking about! After all, we can all read snobum. That is if you don't know any better.

Thank you.
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Old 11-11-2013, 04:21 PM   #26
dimikk OP
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Supershaft,
I did spin it before taking it out, but couldn't really tell. The pushrod was rubbing the tube wall at 11 o'clock. I had to really push down on it to make it centered in the tube. When i was rolling it on the glass it did make a wobble sound, but i couldn't notice the bend at first because it's so little.



Who's the best guy to buy from on your opinion, guys? Max bmw? i need shit fast, looks like most of them take 10-20 days to deliver.
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Old 11-11-2013, 07:10 PM   #27
supershaft
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I meant spin the pushrod while it was still in the valve lash adjuster cup BEFORE you took the rocker arm off. Sorry I wasn't clearer.

You need to take that cylinder off and replace the pushrod tube as well. My advise is to slow down and do it right. Don't be in a hurry the first time you are doing something. Not if you care about doing it right anyway. Do it a dozen times before you even think for a nano second about being in a hurry.

I get all my parts from San Francisco BMW. AWESOME parts department!
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Old 11-12-2013, 07:22 AM   #28
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If that bike is the right side up, the loose pushrod shouldn't be able to just sit that high in the hole, it should be resting against the head. It looks to me like you have a head gasket that's not in right, partly blocking the pushrod hole.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:13 AM   #29
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If that bike is the right side up, the loose pushrod shouldn't be able to just sit that high in the hole, it should be resting against the head. It looks to me like you have a head gasket that's not in right, partly blocking the pushrod hole.
I think the dent on the pushrod tube is too deep, so it's holding it up.
May be i will be able to see with the flashlight whats going on inside the tube.....
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Old 11-12-2013, 10:01 AM   #30
supershaft
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I think the dent on the pushrod tube is too deep, so it's holding it up.
May be i will be able to see with the flashlight whats going on inside the tube.....
I don't think Pokie has read the entire thread. I have found numerous head gaskets installed backwards and none of them held a pushrod up like that. It's the bent pushrod tube. The same thing that bent and scared thusly that pushrod.
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